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30th Anniversary Celebration a Great Success!

slideshow

Returning library staff enjoyed a slideshow of historical photos, including photos of library staff from the early days of Hodges Library. Click through this series of historical photos at your own pace.

Our 30th anniversary celebration of the John C. Hodges Library was a great success!

Students thronged to our Street Fair in the Commons yesterday afternoon. The Libraries, the Office of Information Technology, and other Commons partners hosted booths at which they posed trivia questions in exchange for tickets to a prize drawing. Trivia quizzes harked back to the decade the expanded Hodges Library opened its doors. OIT, for instance, challenged guests to identify computer gear from the ‘80s.

Visitors to the Street Fair could experiment with virtual reality equipment from the Studio or play classic computer games like Pac-Man. At the end of the day, those who held winning tickets to our drawing took home handheld “retro” arcade games.

A reception and remarks followed the Street Fair. Among those offering remarks were Doug McCarty, the lead architect on the 1987 expansion of Hodges Library, and Pauline Bayne, the former UT librarian who planned and oversaw the move of more than a million books into the new library.

It was a day for celebrating with CAKE! A thousand cupcakes fueled the afternoon Street Fair. And the final ceremony of the day was cutting a cake shaped just like the Hodges Library (a masterpiece by Magpies Bakery).

Left: Yum! A Hodges-shaped cake.

“Rocky Top” Manuscript Unveiling, November 3

As part of UT’s week-long Homecoming festivities, you are invited to the grand opening of the “Rocky Top” Exhibit at Hodges Library.

The exhibit will feature the original handwritten manuscript written by songwriters Felice and Boudleaux Bryant in 1967 at the Gatlinburg Inn.

Special guests for the evening will be Del and Dane Bryant, sons of Felice and Boudleaux. who have graciously loaned the manuscript, the guitar their father used to compose the song, and other memorabilia related to the greatest fight song in all of College Athletics!

Come join us as we welcome “Rocky Top” Home Sweet Home!

Friday, November 3, 2017
6:30 p.m. Remarks & Unveiling
First-floor Galleria
John C. Hodges Library

The exhibit is in the Elaine Altman Evans Exhibit Area on the first floor. Remarks will be offered in the adjacent Jack E. Reese Galleria.

Parking will be reserved in Staff Lot 12 in front of Hodges Library.

Please RSVP for the Rocky Top Exhibit Opening here.

Open Textbooks Save UT Students Over $500,000

Students are concerned about the rising costs of textbooks. Open textbooks can remedy some of the impact on student budgets.

Open textbooks are openly-licensed works that are freely available to everyone.

UT faculty are beginning to adopt open textbooks in their courses, and the Student Government Association, with the help of the Office of the Provost and the University Libraries, is tracking the resulting savings to students. The SGA has mounted giant thermometers around campus to measure the total savings.

On Wednesday, October 11, students gathered in Hodges Library to update the total registered on one of those thermometers. That total for 2017-18 has now surpassed half-a-million dollars!

Besides saving money for students, openly-licensed textbooks allow instructors to customize the texts for their courses by revising and remixing content without seeking additional permissions.

Librarians invite instructors to learn more about open textbooks, compare textbook options — from open textbooks to inclusive access to print books — and read about our campus open education leaders on the Libraries’ Open Educational Resources Portal.

We’ll be sharing more updates on our goal to saving students $1 Million, so stay tuned!

Writers in the Library Presents Stanley Plumly, Oct. 23

On Monday, October 23, Stanley Plumly will read at the University of Tennessee as part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. Stanley Plumly’s Old Heart (W. W. Norton, 2007) won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Paterson Poetry Prize, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography (W. W. Norton, 2008) was runner-up for the PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Distinguished Biography. In 2010 Plumly was elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

His most recent collection of poems, Orphan Hours, was published by W. W. Norton in 2012. His latest nonfiction work, The Immortal Evening: A Legendary Dinner with Keats, Wordsworth, and Lamb, was released from Norton in 2014. Plumly has taught at Princeton, Columbia, the University of Iowa, and the University of Michigan, among other places. He is currently a Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Maryland.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.
A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. 

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@nullutk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.

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Facebook: Writers.in.the.Library
Twitter: utklibwriters
 

Hodges Library is 30 Years Old — Let’s Celebrate!

Two Thousand Seventeen marks the thirtieth anniversary of the John C. Hodges Library. Join us October 23 to celebrate.

We’ll begin our celebration with a Street Fair in the Commons.

From 3 to 5 p.m., Monday, October 23, “Main Street” in the open-space Commons on the second floor of Hodges Library will host “retro” arcade games, a radio broadcast — and 1,000 orange-and-white cupcakes! Guests who are willing to test their knowledge of the library at one of the carnival booths can pick up tickets for a drawing.

A reception and remarks will follow at 5:30 p.m. in the first-floor galleria outside Special Collections. The adjacent Elaine Altman Evans Exhibit Area will unveil new displays including the original architects’ model for Hodges Library and a pictorial retrospective of “UT Then & Now.” Both the Street Fair and the reception are free and open to all.

old Undergraduate Library

The old Undergraduate Library stood on the same site as the current Hodges Library. Note the escalator!

Once upon a time, faculty and graduate students used the “Graduate” Library, and lower-classmen used the “Undergraduate” Library—located on the same site as the present Hodges Library.

Undergraduates were not allowed into the “closed stacks” of the Hoskins “Graduate” Library. To get a book, they jotted down bibliographic information from the card catalog and presented a request slip to a library “page.” With construction of the John C. Hodges Undergraduate Library in 1969, undergrads could at last browse the stacks.

With expansion of the Hodges Library in 1987, all library collections were finally assembled in one location.

Hodges Library is 30 Years Old — Let’s Celebrate!

Two Thousand Seventeen marks the thirtieth anniversary of the John C. Hodges Library. Join us October 23 to celebrate.

We’ll begin our celebration with a Street Fair in the Commons.

From 3 to 5 p.m., Monday, October 23, “Main Street” in the open-space Commons on the second floor of Hodges Library will host “retro” arcade games, a radio broadcast — and 1,000 orange-and-white cupcakes! Guests who are willing to test their knowledge of the library at one of the carnival booths can pick up tickets for a drawing.

A reception and remarks will follow at 5:30 p.m. in the first-floor galleria outside Special Collections. The adjacent Elaine Altman Evans Exhibit Area will unveil new displays including the original architects’ model for Hodges Library and a pictorial retrospective of “UT Then & Now.” Both the Street Fair and the reception are free and open to all.

moving books

Staff wait to load books onto specially-constructed book trucks.

Thirty years ago, library staff moved and merged a million books from three different locations into the brand-new John C. Hodges Library.

paging books

Paul Trentham, head of Circulation, staffs a paging station.

The new Hodges Library was a significant expansion of an earlier library that stood on the same site. During the new construction, books from the earlier Hodges Undergraduate Library (UGL) were temporarily relocated. Upon completion of the new building, library and facilities staff – not an outside contractor – moved and merged 1.1 million books, 1.5 million microforms and half a million maps, government documents, and other items from Hoskins Library, the old UGL, and a storage facility. The move took three months.

Amazingly, they managed to track and provide access to the collection throughout the move.

Writers in the Library: Michael Shou-Yung Shum & Jesse Goolsby, Oct. 2

On Monday, October 2nd, novelists Michael Shou-Yung Shum and Jesse Goolsby will read at the University of Tennessee. The event is part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series.

Born and raised in Houston, Texas, Michael Shou-Yung Shum eventually found himself dealing poker in a dead-end casino in Lake Stevens, Washington. Two doctorates bookend this turn of events: the first in Psychology from Northwestern, and the second in English from University of Tennessee. Along the way, Michael spent a dozen years in Chicago, touring the country as a rave DJ. He currently resides in Astoria, Queens, with Jaclyn Watterson and three cats. Queen of Spades (Forest Avenue Press) is his first novel.

Jesse Goolsby is the author of the novel I’d Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). His fiction and essays have appeared in places like EPOCH, The Kenyon Review, Narrative Magazine and Salon. He is the recipient of the Richard Bausch Short Story Prize and the John Gardner Memorial Award in Fiction, among other honors. A US Air Force officer, Goolsby holds a Masters in English from the University of Tennessee and a PhD in Creative Writing from Florida State University.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.

A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@nullutk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.

###

Facebook: Writers.in.the.Library
Twitter: utklibwriters

Hodges Library is 30 Years Old — Let’s Celebrate!

Two Thousand Seventeen marks the thirtieth anniversary of the John C. Hodges Library. Join us October 23 to celebrate.

We’ll begin our celebration with a Street Fair in the Commons.

From 3 to 5 p.m., Monday, October 23, “Main Street” in the open-space Commons on the second floor of Hodges Library will host “retro” arcade games, a radio broadcast — and 1,000 orange-and-white cupcakes! Guests who are willing to test their knowledge of the library at one of the carnival booths can pick up tickets for a drawing.

A reception and remarks will follow at 5:30 p.m. in the first-floor galleria outside Special Collections. The adjacent Elaine Altman Evans Exhibit Area will unveil new displays including the original architects’ model for Hodges Library and a pictorial retrospective of “UT Then & Now.” Both the Street Fair and the reception are free and open to all.

Do your eyes deceive you?

No, this is how Hodges Library looked in the ’70s and early ’80s, viewed from McClung Plaza. The John C. Hodges Library in its present incarnation, the familiar ziggurat-shaped building, is an expansion of this earlier building of the same name.

The new expansion essentially wrapped around the core of the older building and more than tripled the library’s square footage. The new, expanded John C. Hodges Library opened in September 1987.

Now showing: sci-fi thriller “Scanners,” Oct. 4

Join us at Hodges Library for free screenings of independent and foreign films. Feature films will be screened at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium on the first Wednesday of each month, throughout the fall and spring semesters.

Showing
Wednesday, October 4,
at 7 p.m.

Scanners

. . . a sci-fi horror thriller from director David Cronenberg. A scientist sends a man with extraordinary psychic powers to hunt others like himself. Available for off-campus streaming through Kanopy.

For more information, contact librarian Michael Deike at mdeike@nullutk.edu.

Big Orange STEM Saturday for Educators, Oct. 7

East Tennessee K-12 teachers, guidance counselors, and educators of all descriptions are invited to learn ways to help students excel in science and math during Big Orange STEM Saturday for Educators on October 7 at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

The free half-day event is hosted by UT Libraries, The East TN STEM Hub, and the Center for Enhancing Education in Mathematics and Sciences (CEEMS) and will be held at UT’s John C. Hodges Library, 1015 Volunteer Blvd. Teachers from participating school districts will receive professional development credit.

Christopher Lavan, director of Experience Learning at UT, will lead the Keynote Conversation. Experience Learning provides opportunities for UT students to be involved in civic engagement, solve complex real-world problems, and contribute to the welfare of their communities as part of their regular course work.

“This generation . . . they look for these engaging experiences,” Lavan says of the Experience Learning program. “We’re trying to give our students that greater edge so they can continue to lead not just on campus but in the communities in which they choose to live after they leave us.”

Experience Learning has connected UT students with real-world projects such as improving safety on Knoxville roads and developing visualization software.

Breakout sessions at Big Orange STEM Saturday will include:

  • “Communicating Science: Do’s and Don’ts.” Presented by the UT chapter of Ask a Scientist. Professional and student members of Ask a Scientist give talks and demonstrations in school classrooms, at Zoo Knoxville, and other local venues.
  • “English Learners and STEM for All? Where Should We Begin?” Presenter Clara Lee Brown from UT’s Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education trains future educators to work with English-language learners.
  • “Resources and Grant Opportunities for K-12 Math/Science/STEM Teachers.” Presenter Gale Stanley is a retired Campbell County science educator who, over the past three years, has secured $1.5 million in grants for the Campbell County Schools. Co-presenter Michael Lawson is a UT doctoral student. Through the grant-funded Math Counts Projects, they help K-12 educators devise challenging and creative activities to teach STEM subjects.
  • “Science Inquiry: Everyday Ideas and Materials.” Presenter Patricia Stinger-Barnes teaches science education and urban multicultural teacher education at UT.
  • “Using Mobile Technology in the Classroom.” Presented by educational technologists Jeff Beard and Blanche O’Bannon.

Representatives from the various STEM curricula at UT and local STEM-related businesses, organizations, and corporations will be on hand to answer questions.

For more information, visit the event website.

CONTACTS:

Thura Mack, UT Libraries (865-974-6381, tmack@nullutk.edu).
Lynn Hodge, Center for Enhancing Education in Mathematics and Sciences (865-974-8778, lhodge4@nullutk.edu).

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