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UT’s Andrew Jackson Project Adds Tenth Online Volume

The Papers of Andrew Jackson project at the University of Tennessee gathers and publishes the papers of America’s seventh president. A tenth volume of Jackson’s papers is now available online.

Since 1971, the project has been dedicated to transcribing and publishing Old Hickory’s entire written record. A worldwide search has gathered copies of every known surviving Jackson document, including letters he wrote and received, official and military papers, presidential addresses, drafts, memoranda, legal papers, and financial records.

UT Press publishes The Papers of Andrew Jackson, and Newfound Press (an online imprint of the UT Libraries) makes searchable and downloadable PDF versions available online. Volumes of The Papers of Andrew Jackson — including the latest volume consisting of documents from 1832 — are accessible through UT’s online archive at trace.tennessee.edu/utk_jackson.

The Jackson documents also are available as The Papers of Andrew Jackson Digital Edition, part of the American Founding Era Collection hosted by the University of Virginia Press Rotunda. The platform allows users to search the full edition, to limit searches to individual volumes, or to search across all the editions in the American Founding Era Collection, including the papers of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and other major figures of the nation’s early history. The Papers of Andrew Jackson Digital Edition also includes direct links from over 1400 transcribed and cited documents in the edition to images of the original manuscripts in the Library of Congress.

Thanks to a subscription by the UT Libraries, the faculty, students, and staff of UT Knoxville have access to the entire American Founding Era Collection. Members of the public may use the American Founding Era Collection on campus at the Hodges, Pendergrass, or DeVine libraries.

The Papers of Andrew Jackson is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Tennessee, the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Tennessee Historical Commission. The next volume of The Papers of Andrew Jackson is due for publication in 2019.

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Contact:
Dan Feller, Professor of History and Director of the Papers of Andrew Jackson, 865-974-7077, dfeller@nullutk.edu
Martha Rudolph, Marketing & Communication, UT Libraries, 865-974-4273, mrudolp2@nullutk.edu

Music Library Closed July 18 – Aug. 20

The George F. DeVine Music Library will be closed from the afternoon of July 18 through August 20 for an upgrade to the compact shelving.

During the closure, all university students, faculty, and staff may request that items from the Music Library be held for pick-up at the public services desk at Hodges Library or Pendergrass Library. See “How do I make a request?” at lib.utk.edu/request/lx-delivery/.

Faculty, staff, and graduate students also may request Library Express Delivery to a departmental office. See “Where does Library Express deliver?” at lib.utk.edu/request/lx-delivery/.

Unfortunately, there may be times that the collection will be inaccessible even to Music Library staff (as is likely to be the case during the week of July 30 through August 6).

If you know of an item that you be need at any time during the July 18-August 20 closure, we encourage you to request it before the closing on July 18.

We apologize for any inconvenience. If you have questions, please contact Music Library staff at 865-974-3474 or musiclib@nullutk.edu.

Workshop: Developing Learning Materials Using Open Edu. Resources, July 31

Workshop: 10:00-noon, Tuesday, July 31, 220E Hodges Library
Bring your own laptop or tablet, or use one provided by OIT.
Please register for the workshop here.

Save students money on textbooks. Learn how to find Open Educational Resources (OER) and turn them into your own course materials!

In this workshop, we will highlight:

  • Sources and technologies for public domain and creative commons images, videos, textbooks, course units, and other media
  • Practice identifying and assigning proper OER licensing
  • Learn to evaluate OER for fit and quality
  • Discuss options for sharing OER
  • How to guide students in the creation of OER

For more information, contact Rachel Caldwell, Scholarly Communication Librarian, at rachelcaldwell@nullutk.edu.

Data Visualization & Infographics Design Presentation 7/11

Ann K. Emery is an information designer who helps people do a better job communicating with data. You are invited to her presentation on using Excel to make better graphs and reports. Learn how to make your technical information instantly understandable to a non-technical audience.

Join us for a keynote presentation 9:00-10:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 11, in the Hodges Library auditorium. Please register here so that we can gauge attendance.

Emery is a consultant and frequent presenter at conferences. She has a knack for teaching researchers to design visuals that deliver bite-sized information that viewers can understand at a glance. Emery is in high demand for her workshops such as Great Graphs and Dashboard Design.

Teens from YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center Visit UT Library

Aspiring young poets from Knoxville’s YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center visited the UT Knoxville campus on June 25. They stopped by Special Collections in the Hodges Library to learn more about the poet for whom the community center is named.

In Special Collections, the visitors saw a rare signed first edition of Phillis Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in 1773, the first published book by an African American woman. Wheatley was seven years old when she was captured by slavers in West Africa, transported to America, and sold at auction. She was emancipated in 1773, the year her book was published.

Christopher Caldwell, the UT Libraries’ humanities services librarian, showed the students a number of rare poetry books and explained why such rare and fragile items are housed in Special Collections.

The teenagers took part in two poetry workshops this spring under the tutelage of UT English professor Katy Chiles and English major Kelli Frawley—a poetry-writing workshop and a workshop on famous African American poets. In the poetry-writing workshop, students wrote poems about Knoxville, taking their inspiration from the poem “Knoxville, Tennessee” by poet Nikki Giovanni, a native Knoxvillian.

The idea for the Phillis Wheatley Poetry Project emerged from conversations between Caldwell and Chiles while the two were attending a rare books conference.

The YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center is a community center in the east Knoxville area that offers programs for seniors and after-school enrichment for young people.

YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center to Visit UT Library, View Rare Books

Aspiring young poets from Knoxville’s YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center will visit the UT Knoxville campus next Monday, June 25. Their visit will include a tour of the John C. Hodges Library and a stop by Special Collections to learn more about the poet for whom the community center is named.

The teenagers took part in two poetry workshops this spring under the tutelage of UT English professor Katy Chiles and English major Kelli Frawley—a poetry-writing workshop and a workshop on famous African American poets. In the poetry-writing workshop, students wrote poems about Knoxville, taking their inspiration from the poem “Knoxville, Tennessee” by poet Nikki Giovanni, a native Knoxvillian.

Chiles teaches and writes about African American and Native American literature. She hopes the students will be inspired to consider writing as a career option.

Phillis Wheatley was an enslaved African woman whose book, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in 1773, was the first published book by an African American woman. Wheatley was seven years old when she was captured by slavers in West Africa, transported to America, and sold at auction. She was emancipated in 1773, the year her book was published. Wheatley died in childbirth at age thirty-one.


In 2014, the UT Libraries purchased a rare first edition of Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. UT’s copy of the book is particularly noteworthy because it contains a rare inscription by the poet herself. The Wheatley volume and other rare books by African-American authors will be on display when the visitors from the YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center visit Special Collections.

The idea for the Phillis Wheatley Poetry Project emerged from conversations between professor Chiles and Christopher Caldwell, the UT Libraries’ humanities services librarian, while the two were attending a rare books conference. They collaborated with Thura Mack, the UT Libraries’ coordinator of community learning services and diversity programs, and Javiette Samuel, the director of community engagement and outreach in UT’s Office of Research, to plan the program and secure funding. Funding for the Phillis Wheatley Poetry Project was provided by the UT English Department and the UT Council for Diversity and Interculturalism. Kathy Mack, director of the YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center, helped organize the program.

The YWCA Phyllis Wheatley Center is a community center in the east Knoxville area that offers programs for seniors and after-school enrichment for young people.

Digital Collection Spotlights Tennessee’s First Home Demonstration Agent

Virginia P. Moore was Tennessee’s first home demonstration agent. Her work with farm women and rural girls in the early 20th century is documented in a new digital collection created by the University of Tennessee Libraries.

The Virginia P. Moore Collection can be viewed online at digital.lib.utk.edu/vpmoore.

Moore organized canning clubs in rural counties, teaching girls to cultivate and preserve their own produce, as well as introducing them to new home conveniences. Many photographs in the digital collection feature canning club girls at state fairs and canning competitions or tending their garden plots.

Farm and home demonstration work arose out of the Progressive movement, which sought to better people’s lives, especially through education. Legislation enacted in the late 19th and early 20th century created land-grant colleges (Morrill Act, 1862), established agricultural experiment stations (Hatch Act, 1887), and sent demonstration agents into rural areas to share the latest research on improved farming and homemaking practices (Smith-Lever Act, 1914).

Moore worked as a rural teacher, then as an organizer of school improvement associations, upgrading rural schools. In 1910, she became Tennessee’s first home demonstration agent, working with women and girls in developing canning clubs. With passage of the Smith-Lever Act in 1914, she moved from Nashville to Knoxville to become assistant director in charge of home demonstration work in the new Division of Extension under UT’s College of Agriculture. By 1916, Moore had 32 home demonstration agents reporting to her at the county level, as well as two district-level agents in East and West Tennessee.

Today, UT Extension, the outreach unit of the UT Institute of Agriculture, continues to improve lives by delivering research-based information to citizens throughout the state.

The Virginia P. Moore Collection, documenting Moore’s life and career, was donated to UT Libraries’ Special Collections by her great-niece. In addition to the photographs that were digitized for the online collection, donated materials include Moore’s notes, letters, and publications, as well as recipes and club reports from the canning clubs with which she worked.

Special Collections acquires and preserves collections of manuscripts, books, printed ephemera, maps, and other unique research materials for use by researchers from around the world.

Read a lengthier article about Virginia P. Moore at http://tiny.utk.edu/vpmoore.pdf.

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Pictured above (from the Virginia P. Moore Collection, Special Collections, University of Tennessee Libraries):
1) Sealing contest at the Tennessee State Fair, 1912. Virginia P. Moore is on the far right.
2) Mrs. J. J. Hardin giving pruning demonstration to four members.
3) Two Hamilton County canning club members with exhibit of canned produce and baked goods.

Here’s #HowToGetIntoHodges

You’ve seen our video tutorial on #HowToGetIntoHodges, right? We showed you how Vols have learned to use the pull and push method, the buddy system, the side kick, and total avoidance to get past the heavy doors of Hodges Library.

The doors at the Melrose entrance are lovely. But after 30 years on the job, they have become increasingly obstinate . . . I mean unwieldy!

We’ve tried oiling the hinges. We’ve tried replacing the hinges. We’ve tried new pneumatic closers. We’ve even tried coaxing and wheedling. All for nought. Neit. Nein. No way.

So-o-o-o-o-o-o-o, we’re replacing the doors. (That’ll show ‘em!)

Remodeling of the Melrose entrance will begin sometime between late May to early June and will incorporate a whole new set of doors for your effortless entrance to the heart of campus.

We know you can’t wait to feel the breeze in your hair as you glide into the library with poise, so stay tuned for updates on our timing and progress. There will be fun in store!

Awards and Recognitions

UT Libraries and librarians were honored with several awards this spring.

The Libraries’ Diversity Committee received this year’s Dr. Marva Rudolph Diversity and Interculturalism Unit Excellence Award. Thura Mack accepted the award on behalf of the committee at the Chancellor’s Honors Banquet on April 17. Our Diversity Committee was recognized for having “demonstrated continual campus leadership in diversity through professional development, educational programs, and wellness events, as well as through diversity-centered research presented at the local, state, and national level.” The Diversity Resident program and the “Difficult Conversations” lunch-and-learn series were also mentioned. Continue reading

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