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Training Session: Use the 3D Anatomy Table in Your Teaching

Faculty are invited to a training session for the Libraries’ new 3D anatomy table on Thursday, June 14, 1:30-3:00 p.m., in 213 Hodges Library. Please register to attend by June 11. You may also register to receive a recording of the session.

An official trainer for the touch-screen 3D Anatomage Table will be on site (in town from the Anatomage headquarters in California) to teach best practices and offer ideas for using the anatomy table in your teaching. Refreshments will be provided.

The Anatomage Table is equipped with digital cadavers that allow students to visualize thousands of anatomical structures and to perform virtual dissections as they would on a real cadaver. The Libraries’ table is loaded with four full-sized human models and more than 1,000 pathological examples, including animal cases.

The table will be housed in Hodges Library and will be available for class use beginning fall semester 2018. Additional training sessions will be offered this summer and fall.

The Anatomage software includes supplemental teaching materials and quizzes to support classroom instruction. To access curriculum materials or for further information, contact Melanie Allen, UT Libraries Health Sciences Librarian (melanie-allen@nullutk.edu).

The anatomy table was purchased through a grant from the Gladys Brooks Foundation, a supporter of nonprofit libraries, educational institutions, hospitals, and clinics.

Here’s #HowToGetIntoHodges

You’ve seen our video tutorial on #HowToGetIntoHodges, right? We showed you how Vols have learned to use the pull and push method, the buddy system, the side kick, and total avoidance to get past the heavy doors of Hodges Library.

The doors at the Melrose entrance are lovely. But after 30 years on the job, they have become increasingly obstinate . . . I mean unwieldy!

We’ve tried oiling the hinges. We’ve tried replacing the hinges. We’ve tried new pneumatic closers. We’ve even tried coaxing and wheedling. All for nought. Neit. Nein. No way.

So-o-o-o-o-o-o-o, we’re replacing the doors. (That’ll show ‘em!)

Remodeling of the Melrose entrance will begin sometime between late May to early June and will incorporate a whole new set of doors for your effortless entrance to the heart of campus.

We know you can’t wait to feel the breeze in your hair as you glide into the library with poise, so stay tuned for updates on our timing and progress. There will be fun in store!

Awards and Recognitions

UT Libraries and librarians were honored with several awards this spring.

The Libraries’ Diversity Committee received this year’s Dr. Marva Rudolph Diversity and Interculturalism Unit Excellence Award. Thura Mack accepted the award on behalf of the committee at the Chancellor’s Honors Banquet on April 17. Our Diversity Committee was recognized for having “demonstrated continual campus leadership in diversity through professional development, educational programs, and wellness events, as well as through diversity-centered research presented at the local, state, and national level.” The Diversity Resident program and the “Difficult Conversations” lunch-and-learn series were also mentioned.

The Student Government Association named the UT Libraries their SGA Campus Partner of the Year for 2017-18. Rachel Caldwell accepted the award at SGA’s Transition Ceremony on April 26. The UT Libraries was recognized for collaborating with SGA to encourage the use of open educational resources (OER) in university courses. Open textbooks, one type of OER, can be read online for free, potentially saving each student hundreds of dollars a year. Together, SGA and the Libraries have been tracking the savings from adoptions of open textbooks. During the 2017-18 academic year, UT instructors who adopted open textbooks in their courses saved students almost $750,000.

Holly Dean was honored April 11 with the Faculty Environmental Leadership Award for her efforts in starting a seed library, a project for students to learn hands-on about sustainable gardening practices. The award was conferred by the Committee on the Campus Environment, a program of the Office of Sustainability.

Holly Mercer was recognized for “Extraordinary Collaborations in Research Compliance and Safety” by the UT Office of Research and Engagement at their 3rd annual Research Integrity and Compliance Awards in February.

Ken Wise was recently a guest of honor at the Department of Religious Studies end-of-semester awards ceremony for students and faculty. He was presented with the Department of Religious Studies Certificate of Appreciation for his work as the liaison librarian to Religious Studies faculty.

Award ceremonies, top to bottom: Dr. Marva Rudolph Diversity and Interculturalism Unit Excellence Award; Faculty Environmental Leadership Award; Research Integrity and Compliance Awards; Department of Religious Studies

A Makerspace in the Library

makerspace postersA makerspace is coming to Hodges Library. We’ve been polling students to capture their vision for what’s to come.

Makerspaces provide tools and space where people with shared interests gather to work on projects while trading ideas and knowledge.

There are makerspaces for arts and crafts, and makerspaces for rapid prototyping of new products, just to name a few scenarios.

A makerspace may allow the novice to explore woodworking, metalworking, and electronics in the same workshop. CAD software, 3D printers, legos, lathes, laser cutters — any or all of these might be found in a makerspace.

In April, we celebrated National Library Week with a makerspace fair in the Hodges, Pendergrass, and Devine libraries. Booths set up along the Hodges second-floor hallway showcased gaming, 3D printing, and other “maker” crafts, and let students try their hands at traditional crafts such as origami or Japanese stab binding.

We used the opportunity to gather students’ ideas for the makerspace. Any student who filled out our survey got a ticket for a free makerspace t-shirt from our on-site screen-printing operation. T-shirts featured the custom designs our Marketing and Communication team created to generate interest in the makerspace and the Libraries in general as a space for everyone (“A space for the visionary,” “A space for the naturalist,” “A space for the mad scientist,” etc.).

Ours won’t be the first makerspace on campus. The Innovation and Collaboration Studio hosted by the Tickle College of Engineering and the College of Architecture and Design’s downtown Fab Lab are already allowing students to turn their ideas into prototypes.

The great thing about a centrally-located Libraries makerspace that is open to all students is the opportunity for multidisciplinary collaboration. Bringing together students with different skill sets and differing perspectives — especially students who aren’t traditionally prompted to work in this type of space — can spark innovation.

Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library gave away its own limited-edition t-shirt, as well as samples from the library’s 3D printing operation.

From the Studio: “It’s On Us”

UT student Beverly Banks recently produced a video encouraging her fellow Vols to take a stand against sexual assault. From filming to post-production, the video was created entirely in the Studio media production lab in Hodges Library.

April was national Sexual Assault Awareness Month. On the UT Knoxville campus, the annual Hike The Hill In Heels kicked off a month of events intended to raise awareness about rape and sexual assault.

One national organization, It’s On Us, focuses year-round on the goal of ending sexual assault on college campuses. UT students founded an It’s On Us chapter this year, and chapter president Amber Giffin enlisted Banks to run the digital side of the organization. Together they wrote the script for a public service announcement encouraging members of the campus community to speak out against sexual violence by taking the pledge at itsonus.org.

“We wanted the script to reflect the mission of the It’s On Us movement, as well as the values of the Volunteer community,” Banks said. “I felt it was important that our organization produce this video to show the Volunteer community that we support sexual assault survivors.”

The video was shared with the campus community through UT’s e-newsletters, Vol Update for students and Tennessee Today for faculty and staff.

Possibly the most time-consuming part of the video project was recruiting performers. Twenty students and university leaders took part, including the former chancellor, the university’s Title IX coordinator, the director of the Center for Health Education and Wellness, UT’s coordinator for sexual violence prevention, and athletic director Phillip Fulmer. “Their support speaks volumes on campus,” Banks said.

She was equally appreciative of the student participants. “The student voices in this video were so crucial to successfully promote this message. When you see other students supporting this amazing campaign, it demonstrates the Volunteer spirit in action. Vols do help Vols, and Vols do speak up. The power of the student voice and its impact on campus is clearly visible within this video.” We agree.

Watch UT’s “It’s On Us” video here.

Overall, Banks invested about 20 hours in creating the video. She recorded each vignette in the Studio’s video room and edited her footage at one of the video workstations. She praised the helpful Studio staff: “The staff at the Studio desk were absolutely wonderful! Each time I checked out the video room, they helped me set up the lights and pull down the backdrop. I could not have produced this video without their assistance. I am so grateful that UT has such wonderful staff at the libraries who are eager to help students with their projects!”

Banks is a longtime user of the Studio and has become an accomplished videographer. As an intern at The Volunteer Channel, she would check out a camera and microphone from the Studio to shoot her news stories, then use the Studio’s Whisper Room to record voiceovers. “I received most of my training from the School of Journalism and The Volunteer Channel. However, the resources in the libraries gave me the tools to practice shooting video and editing.”

Banks will graduate Summa Cum Laude with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and electronic media this spring. She has received several recognitions for her tv news stories and was named 2018 Outstanding Graduate in the School of Journalism and Electronic Media. At the Chancellor’s Honors Banquet on April 17, she received an award for Extraordinary Professional Promise.

We at the Libraries are proud to have been a part of Beverly Banks’ Volunteer story. We will be watching to see how she uses her media skills to make the world a better place.

Pendergrass Library temporarily closed for renovations

Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library was temporarily closed for renovations on May 9. Over the summer, library services will be available in the nearby Brehm Animal Science Building, Room 243 (computer lab). The library will reopen prior to fall semester.

The temporary service point in 243 Brehm is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Library staff can also meet with patrons by appointment in other locations.

During the renovation, staff will page materials from the collection to fulfill requests, and the large-format and 3D printing services will remain in operation. Patrons will be able to check out or return materials, including laptops, and pick up posters and 3D prints at 243 Brehm.

If you have questions, please contact Pendergrass Library staff at 865-974-7338 or agvetlib@nullutk.edu. Individual staff members can be reached by email (see listings at lib.utk.edu/agvet/staff).

UT Libraries is “SGA Campus Partner of the Year”

The Student Government Association has named the UT Libraries their SGA Campus Partner of the Year for 2017-18. Librarian Rachel Caldwell accepted the award at SGA’s Transition Ceremony on April 26.

The UT Libraries was recognized for collaborating with SGA to encourage the use of open educational resources (OER) in university courses. Open textbooks, one type of OER, can be read online for free, potentially saving each student hundreds of dollars a year. For several years, the Libraries has spearheaded an effort, led by scholarly communication librarian Rachel Caldwell, to inform campus about how open textbooks benefit both students and instructors.

In 2017, the Libraries worked with SGA to establish the SGA Open Education Award, which recognizes instructors who adopt OER in their courses. Together, SGA and the Libraries have been tracking the savings from adoptions of open textbooks. During the 2017-18 academic year, UT instructors who adopted open textbooks in their courses saved students almost $750,000.

The Libraries’ administration also was acknowledged for inviting SGA input to library planning with a standing invitation to the SGA president or delegate to hold an ex officio seat on the Libraries’ Dean’s Student Advisory Committee (DSAC). This ensures valuable feedback from SGA on improving library services and resources. DSAC members, in turn, were invited to review nominations and make recommendations for SGA Open Education Awards.

Rachel Caldwell and student success librarian Anna Sandelli, both of whom worked closely with the SGA over the past year, look forward to another productive year of collaboration in 2018-19.

UT Libraries Now Has a 3D Anatomy Table

The University of Tennessee Libraries has acquired a new teaching tool, a 3D anatomy table.

The touch-screen Anatomage Table is an innovative approach to teaching anatomy. Digital cadavers allow students to visualize thousands of anatomical structures and to perform virtual 3D dissections exactly as they would on a real cadaver.

The Anatomage Table is equipped with four full-sized human models and more than 1,000 pathological examples, including animal cases.

“We anticipate that the anatomy table will be used by students and faculty in numerous disciplines, from anthropology to veterinary medicine,” says Melanie Allen, the health sciences librarian for UT’s libraries. “We will offer demonstrations for faculty members this spring and summer.”

The table will be housed in the John C. Hodges Library and will be available for class use beginning fall semester 2018. The Anatomage software includes supplemental curriculum materials and quizzes to support classroom instruction.

The anatomy table was purchased through a grant from the Gladys Brooks Foundation, a supporter of nonprofit libraries, educational institutions, hospitals, and clinics.

For more information, contact Melanie Allen, UT Libraries Health Sciences Librarian (melanie-allen@nullutk.edu).

Nikki Giovanni: 2018 Wilma Dykeman Stokely Memorial Lecture

Nikki GiovanniPoet Nikki Giovanni can be profane, irreverent, and risqué — while delivering a sincere and loving message.

The renowned poet and activist spoke at the Bijou Theatre on April 5. Her presentation was the 2018 Wilma Dykeman Stokely Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Library Society of the University of Tennessee and the Friends of the Knox County Public Library.

Giovanni is the author of 28 books, including three bestsellers, and the recipient of numerous awards and honors that include a Langston Hughes Medal for Outstanding Poetry, seven NAACP Image Awards, and the first Rosa Parks Woman of Courage Award.
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