Re-carpeting throughout Hodges Library

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Re-carpeting on all floors of Hodges Library will begin following final exams and will continue through June.

New carpet will be installed on the ground floor, first floor (including the auditorium), and all stacks floors (floors 3-6). Carpets in faculty studies and beneath graduate carrels also will be replaced.

Small areas within the stacks may be temporarily inaccessible. And access to individual faculty studies may be blocked for brief periods.

If you are unable to access needed materials, please ask for help at the circulation/information desk near the Melrose Avenue entrance.

UT students, faculty, and staff can obtain books from closed areas by using the “Request” link in the library catalog. (Read “How it works” at lib.utk.edu/request/library-express.)

The Libraries will make every effort to assure that the process is as unobtrusive as possible. We apologize for any inconvenience.




Rita Smith Honored for Extraordinary Service to the University

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RitaSmith_April2014Rita Smith, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries’ executive associate dean, is the 2014 recipient of the UT Chancellor’s Citation for Extraordinary Service to the University. Her extraordinary accomplishments and dedication were celebrated at the Chancellor’s Honors Banquet on April 23.

The Chancellor’s Citation for Extraordinary Service to the University is a singular distinction, awarded to an outstanding individual who “goes above and beyond the call of duty to make lasting contributions to the university.”

Rita Smith’s career at the UT Libraries exemplifies this exceptional level of commitment. Her award nomination read in part: “[Rita] has come to work every day of her career with no other desire than to go above and beyond the call of duty for the students, faculty, and staff of the University of Tennessee.” Her nomination further notes that her commitment to excellence is only surpassed by her modesty and commitment to collaboration—most are not aware of the breadth and depth of her contributions because “she is a consummate team player who thinks of others first and never seeks the limelight for herself.”

Rita Smith first joined the UT Libraries 38 years ago, rising from the position of reference librarian to reference coordinator to department head to her current position of executive associate dean. Along the way, she has been a major force behind many of the Libraries’ successes.

As head of the reference department, she helped guide the UT Libraries’ entry into the online age, assuring that the Libraries adapted resources and services to fit the changing needs of scholarship and learning at the university and that librarians and staff were well trained to implement new technologies and services.

Smith is a campus champion for diversity. She serves on UT’s Council for Diversity and Interculturalism and leads the Libraries’ Diversity Residency Program, an initiative that brings ethnic and cultural diversity to the Libraries, the library profession, and the campus. She mentors the Diversity Residents, who serve two-year post-graduate internships within the UT libraries.

Over the years, she has mentored dozens of library faculty and staff, many of whom have risen through the ranks to be great leaders at UT and elsewhere.

Smith has demonstrated a talent for managing both people and projects. As executive associate dean, she has primary responsibility for the library as space. The present Commons is largely a result of her foresight and efforts to meet new demands on library spaces to accommodate quiet study, collaborative work, and the use of technologies for knowledge creation and online learning. She led the team that investigated student needs, brought in consultants, and conferred with campus stakeholders to create the learning commons in 2005. The multi-million-dollar renovation of the Commons in 2012, under her direction, was by far the largest single renovation to the Hodges Library since its opening in 1987.

Had Rita Smith chosen to pursue her career elsewhere, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville would be very different today.

Smith is highly regarded by her colleagues for her work ethic, love for the students, and dedication to the UT community. Among her many virtues are a zealous devotion to the UT Vols (particularly the Lady Vols) and an amazing knowledge of players, stats, and sports trivia.




Map Collection Moves, Makes Room for More Study Space in Hodges Library

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The UT Libraries’ Map Collection is relocating, making room for more study space on the ground floor of Hodges Library. Map Services closes May 6 to begin preparing for the move.

Over the summer, the remainder of the map collection will be moved to new quarters in the James D. Hoskins Library (1401 Cumberland Avenue). The entire collection will once again be in one place, and the map collections will be staffed and remain accessible after the relocation takes place. The vacated space on the ground floor of Hodges Library will serve as study space and overflow seating for One Stop. The renovated space should open before fall semester.

Geospatial services (GIS assistance, geospatial data, etc.) will be relocated to Commons South alongside new scholarly digital services.

Library users will have access to the map collections by visiting the Storage Reading Room, 200 Hoskins Library.

If you’ve never visited the Hoskins Library, a pleasant surprise awaits you. The James D. Hoskins Library, designed by renowned architect Charles Barber and built between 1929 and 1931, is collegiate Gothic in style and features vaulted ceilings decorated with literary inscriptions. The main campus library moved from the Hoskins Library to the renovated Hodges Library in 1987.

Please bear with us as we relocate services.




Faculty Book Authors to be Honored April 29

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Faculty members who have published books within the last year will be honored at a reception on Tuesday, April 29, in the John C. Hodges Library.

The campus community is invited to the reception, which will begin at 3:30 p.m. in the Jack E. Reese Galleria on the first floor of the library. Remarks will follow at 4:00 p.m.

The Office of the Provost, the Office of Research and Engagement, and the UT Libraries are hosting the event.

Faculty-authored books will be on display at the reception, which will show the range, depth, and breadth of UT faculty scholarship. For a full list of books authored or co-authored by current faculty, visit quest.utk.edu/books.




During final exams: longer hours and “de-stress” activities

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During finals, campus libraries will be open additional hours and will offer activities to help students “de-stress.” De-Stress For Success activities are sponsored by the UT Libraries, UT Graduate Student Senate, the Student Success Center, UT’s Thornton Athletics Student Life Center, and Threds.

tie-dye 11x17EXTENDED HOURS

Hodges Library:
All floors of Hodges Library will be open continuously from noon, Sunday, April 27, until midnight on Tuesday, May 6.

Pendergrass Agriculture & Veterinary Medicine Library:
Mon., April 28 – Thurs., May 1 — 7:30 am – midnight
Fri., May 2 — 7:30 am – 8 pm
Sat., May 3 — 9 am – 8 pm
Sun., May 4 — noon – midnight
Mon., May 5 — 7:30 am – midnight
Tues., May 6 — 7:30 am – 6 pm

George F. DeVine Music Library:
Sat., April 26 — 10 am – 7 pm
Sun., April 27 — 2 pm – 11 pm
Mon., April 28 – Thurs., May 1 — 8 am – 11 pm
Fri., May 2 — 8 am – 5 pm
Sat., May 3 — 10 am – 7 pm
Sun., May 4 — 2 pm – 11 pm
Mon., May 5 — 8 am – 11 pm
Tues., May 6 — 8 am – 6 pm

DE-STRESS FOR SUCCESS

***New de-stress activity this semester: Tie-Die workshop at the Presidential Courtyard, Monday, April 28, from 11 am to 2 pm***

photobooth-0
Watch for our super-fun photo booth!

The Hodges and Pendergrass libraries will host a number of activities to help students who are feeling overwhelmed by final exams. Both Hodges Library and Pendergrass Agriculture & Veterinary Medicine Library will have HABIT (Human Animal Bond in Tennessee) therapy dogs on hand during finals week.

At Hodges Library, staff will give out health and well-being tips, healthy snacks, and “Power-T Nap” sleep masks (as long as supplies last). SAIS (Student Assessment of Instruction System) will hand out popsicles for an energy boost on Study Day. Ongoing activities include games, cartoons, and coloring books in Room 251, Hodges Library. And watch for our free Photo Booth in Hodges Library, 2-4 pm, on April 30 and May 1.

Pendergrass AgVetMed Library will offer snacks, board games, jigsaw puzzles, crafts, and some outside activities like corn hole toss.

Here’s the full schedule:

De-Stress Calendar6




Comprehensive Bibliography of the Smokies Now Available

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TerraThe culmination of fifteen years of research, Terra Incognita: An Annotated Bibliography of the Great Smoky Mountains, 1544-1934 is the most comprehensive bibliography of sources related to the Great Smoky Mountains ever created. The book is now available for purchase from the University of Tennessee Press.

Terra Incognita catalogs printed material on the Great Smoky Mountains from the earliest map documenting the De Soto expedition in the 16th century to writings that were instrumental in the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each chapter, introduced by a substantive essay, details published works on a different aspect of the history, peoples, culture, and natural history of the Smokies region. There are chapters, for instance, on the Cherokee, early explorers, music, mountain life, and the national park movement.

The authoritative and meticulously researched work is an indispensable reference for scholars and students studying any aspect of the region’s past. According to author and historian Jim Casada, “Terra Incognita belongs in every academic library in the country and locals who simply cherish the Smokies will want to have it on their shelves.”

The title for the bibliography comes from a remark by Horace Kephart, an early twentieth-century chronicler of mountain culture and an important force behind the founding of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Researching the region prior to his first visit in 1904, Kephart found the Great Smoky Mountains to be a “terra incognita.” Little to nothing, it seemed, could be found in libraries to elucidate the land or its people. This new bibliography rectifies that omission by bringing together the scattered and obscure early accounts of the Smokies. (Kephart is the only individual to merit a separate chapter in Terra Incognita.)

Terra Incognita was compiled and edited by three librarians. Anne Bridges and Ken Wise are associate professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries and co-directors of the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project (www.lib.utk.edu/smokies). Russell Clement, emeritus faculty at Northwestern University, worked for many years in academic libraries, most recently as head of the art collection at Northwestern.

An online database, Database of the Smokies (dots.lib.utk.edu), updates Terra Incognita with citations to material published since 1934, the date the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established.

___
Contact:

Anne Bridges, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-0017, abridges@utk.edu)

Ken Wise, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-2359, kwise@utk.edu)

Ordering information: http://utpress.org






Cats staff the research desk — purrfect! (Well, maybe…)

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Room209_cat2We at the UT Libraries pride ourselves on being innovators. But, as it says in Proverbs, pride goeth before a fall . . . or, in this instance, before a face full of claws.

It seemed like a good idea at the time. I mean, cats are all over the Internet, playing pianos, doing everything humans do. We thought, why not? Why not staff the Research Assistance Desk entirely with cats?

I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely apologize to those who have sustained injuries.

From the beginning, staffing at the service desk could only be described as, uh, “independent scheduling”: some cat-librarians didn’t deign to show up for desk hours.

Admittedly, we began getting complaints almost immediately. I received this note from a student early on:

“I was halfway through explaining my thesis on the Middle Kingdom of pharaonic Egypt. I thought the librarian (I believe her name was Miss Kitty) would at least be curious. But she interrupted to tell me how SHE used to be worshipped as a god in ancient Egypt. What a narcissistic diva!”

Library users have variously described our new librarians as “moody,” “haughty,” “inscrutable,” “grumpy.” In other words, the new librarians have not exactly cozied up to our service philosophy. Again, I apologize.

And, of course, things quickly escalated. Here’s another complaint:

“The incident in question took me totally by surprise. ‘Tom’ was conducting a database search for me. All of a sudden his eyes glazed over. He began twitching — then rhythmically thumping — his tail. He just went berserk! I hope these stitches don’t leave scars.”

I can only state . . . Bad kitty! (Regrettably, the rules of tenure preclude any further disciplinary action.) So, if you have a complaint about the level of service in the research assistance area, please fill out a suggestion form, roll it into a ball, and toss it into the room.

And have a HAPPY APRIL FOOL’S DAY!

Sincerely,
Steve Smith
Dean of Libraries




Student Art Winners Announced

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Winners of the Student Art in the Library juried exhibition have been announced. The UT Libraries has been holding Student Art in the Library contests since 2005. The contest is open to UT students in all disciplines, and is judged by a committee of library staff. First-, second-, and third-place winners are awarded cash prizes. This semester the committee received 166 entries from 45 artists. A number of the contributing artists were present for the unveiling on March 7.

The winners are:

hustleFirst Place:
Vera Aldridge
“All the Hustle and Bustle”
Linoleum print


boxquiatSecond Place:
Sterling Goller-Brown
“Boxquiat”
An homage to the artist Jean-Michel Basquiat
Oil, enamel, and oil bars


cowanThird Place:
Mallory Wade Cowan
“Thylakoid,” “Haversian System,” “Moniliform”
A series of abstract works based on biological systems
Oil, acrylic, and spray paint




Exhibiting artists this semester are: 
Vera Aldridge, Paige Burchell, Amanda Carrell, Conor Cook, Mallory Wade Cowan, Melisa Donahue, Sterling Goller-Brown, Lily Heine, Alyssa Johnson, Justin Kaewnopparat, Alena Mehic, Shana Milchuck, Mohammad Moniruzzaman, Richard Murray, Tatiana Potts, Allison Pruter, Ryan Stennes, Mary Julia Tunnell, and Hua Wei.

Artworks will remain on display in 135 Hodges Library throughout the spring semester. View a retrospective of previous Student Art in the Library exhibitions at trace.tennessee.edu/utk_libsart. Read more about the Libraries’ art competition and at lib.utk.edu/artinlibrary.