Win Great Prizes in our Essay Contest–Deadline Extended

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fdl_dttp-1.gifAll enrolled students are welcome to apply. Great prizes!

Deadline extended to November 26, 2007.

What government documents helped shape America? The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights …

What government documents reflect our ingenuity and spirit? The patent applications for the cotton gin and electric light bulb, the Homestead Act, the Act establishing Yellowstone as our first National Park …

What government documents changed the way we live our lives?
The Emancipation Proclamation, the Abolition of Slavery, Women’s Right to Vote, the Civil Rights Act, the GI Bill …

How do these documents influence us every day as Americans? The University Libraries hopes you will answer that question as part of our Great Moments in American Life, History and Culture essay contest.

All UT students are invited to enter the essay contest. The contest is an opportunity to discover and explore government publications that have contributed to a better understanding and appreciation of people, places and events that helped to shape America’s rich and varied history.

With the essay contest, we seek to encourage and challenge students to broaden their understanding of the research process through creative discovery of primary source materials, both print and digital.

The University of Tennessee Libraries is sponsoring the contest this year because we are celebrating some important milestones in our history of providing access to federal and state government information: 110 years as a designated depository library (1897) 100 years as a land-grant depository library (1907), and 90 years as a Tennessee state depository library (1917).

For more information about our anniversary, please visit www.lib.utk.edu/refs/govdocs100/.


Essay Requirements:

1. Choose a milestone document from the LexisNexis Congressional Database that reflects a great moment in America. It can be a law, hearing, report, committee print, regulation or statement from the Congressional Record, but it must be a primary source publication taken from the database. Write a 500 word essay, telling why and how the document has influenced life, history, and culture in America.

Click here to access the LexisNexis Congressional database, or visit www.lib.utk.edu/databases and enter “lexisnexis” in the search box.

2. Essays must be typed and double spaced. Entries can be submitted as a Word document or pdf by sending as an email attachment to govdocessay@utk.edu. Entries can also be printed and hand-delivered to the reference desk, 1st floor, Hodges Library.

3. An entry form, available here, must be submitted with the essay.

4. The essay must be solely the work of the entrant. Brief quotations, if properly documented, may be included in the essay.

5. Only one essay may be submitted by each entrant.

6. Winning essays may be used in the University Libraries publicity and will also be shared with the LexisNexis Corporation, sponsor of the contest.

Eligibility:

1. Entrants must be registered students of the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

2. Full time staff who are also students and employed by the University Libraries are not eligible.

Entries:

1. Essays must be submitted on or before noon on November 26, 2007.

2. Essays must be submitted with the entry form and signed.

3. Essays must include the full citation of the government document that is the subject of the essay.

Judging:

1. Essays will be judged both on style and content.

2. Judges will look for writing that is clear, articulate, logically organized and that makes a compelling argument.

Winner Notification:

1. The winners will be notified on or before December 3, 2007.

2. The winners will receive one of the following prizes:
* 1st prize – $300
* 2nd prize -$200
* 3rd prize – $150
* 4th prize – $50

3. The first 100 entrants will receive a gift for participating

The University of Tennessee Libraries gratefully acknowledges support provided by the LexisNexis Corporation for this contest.




Win Great Prizes in our Essay Contest–Deadline Extended

Posted on


All enrolled students are welcome to apply. Great prizes!

Deadline extended to November 26, 2007.

What government documents helped shape America? The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights …

What government documents reflect our ingenuity and spirit? The patent applications for the cotton gin and electric light bulb, the Homestead Act, the Act establishing Yellowstone as our first National Park …

What government documents changed the way we live our lives?
The Emancipation Proclamation, the Abolition of Slavery, Women’s Right to Vote, the Civil Rights Act, the GI Bill …

How do these documents influence us every day as Americans? The University Libraries hopes you will answer that question as part of our Great Moments in American Life, History and Culture essay contest.

All UT students are invited to enter the essay contest. The contest is an opportunity to discover and explore government publications that have contributed to a better understanding and appreciation of people, places and events that helped to shape America’s rich and varied history.

With the essay contest, we seek to encourage and challenge students to broaden their understanding of the research process through creative discovery of primary source materials, both print and digital.

The University of Tennessee Libraries is sponsoring the contest this year because we are celebrating some important milestones in our history of providing access to federal and state government information: 110 years as a designated depository library (1897) 100 years as a land-grant depository library (1907), and 90 years as a Tennessee state depository library (1917).

For more information about our anniversary, please visit www.lib.utk.edu/refs/govdocs100/.


Essay Requirements:

1. Choose a milestone document from the LexisNexis Congressional Database that reflects a great moment in America. It can be a law, hearing, report, committee print, regulation or statement from the Congressional Record, but it must be a primary source publication taken from the database. Write a 500 word essay, telling why and how the document has influenced life, history, and culture in America.

Click here to access the LexisNexis Congressional database, or visit www.lib.utk.edu/databases and enter “lexisnexis” in the search box.

2. Essays must be typed and double spaced. Entries can be submitted as a Word document or pdf by sending as an email attachment to govdocessay@utk.edu. Entries can also be printed and hand-delivered to the reference desk, 1st floor, Hodges Library.

3. An entry form, available here, must be submitted with the essay.

4. The essay must be solely the work of the entrant. Brief quotations, if properly documented, may be included in the essay.

5. Only one essay may be submitted by each entrant.

6. Winning essays may be used in the University Libraries publicity and will also be shared with the LexisNexis Corporation, sponsor of the contest.

Eligibility:

1. Entrants must be registered students of the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

2. Full time staff who are also students and employed by the University Libraries are not eligible.

Entries:

1. Essays must be submitted on or before noon on November 26, 2007.

2. Essays must be submitted with the entry form and signed.

3. Essays must include the full citation of the government document that is the subject of the essay.

Judging:

1. Essays will be judged both on style and content.

2. Judges will look for writing that is clear, articulate, logically organized and that makes a compelling argument.

Winner Notification:

1. The winners will be notified on or before December 3, 2007.

2. The winners will receive one of the following prizes:
* 1st prize – $300
* 2nd prize -$200
* 3rd prize – $150
* 4th prize – $50

3. The first 100 entrants will receive a gift for participating

The University of Tennessee Libraries gratefully acknowledges support provided by the LexisNexis Corporation for this contest.






Working for Democracy in the South and Appalachia: The Highlander Research and Education Center

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UT Libraries Hosts Documentary Series and Exhibit to celebrate Highlander’s 75th anniversary

The University of Tennessee Libraries is hosting a documentary series and exhibit to teach the university and local communities about the Highlander Research and Education Center, as it celebrates its 75th anniversary this year.

All programs in the Documentaries in the Libraries series are held on Tuesday evenings in the Hodges Library Lindsay Young Auditorium, from 7-9 pm. The programs feature a documentary film showing and discussion led by experts from Highlander, filmmakers, and UT faculty.

The exhibit, on display in Hodges Library outside the reference room, was designed by Sarah Lowe, associate professor of art, and Paul Chinetti, a senior in graphic design. The exhibit is a time line that highlights milestone events in the history of Highlander. It includes many photographs of Highlander students, including civil rights leaders Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks.

The Highlander Center was founded in 1932 to serve as an adult education center for community workers involved in social and economic justice movements. The goal of Highlander was, and is, to provide education and support to poor and working people fighting economic injustice, poverty, prejudice and environmental destruction.

The Highlander Center works internationally, but is located in New Market, Tennessee, 23 miles from Knoxville.

Films & Dates
September 18
You Got to Move
Discussion leader: Pam McMichael, director of the Highlander Research and Education Center

October 2
Uprising of ’34
Discussion leader: Anne Mayhew, UT emeritus professor of economics

October 16
We Shall Overcome
Discussion leader: Tufara Waller Muhammed, cultural program coordinator of the Highlander Research and Education Center

October 30
Morristown
Discussion leaders: Bill Troy and Luvernel Clark

November 13
Up The Ridge
Discussion leader: Amelia Kirby, Up the Ridge documentarian

November 27
The Telling Takes Me Home
Discussion leaders: Guy and Candie Carawan, activists, musicians and educators, with their son, hammered dulcimer player Evan Carawan.
A reception will follow this event in the Mary E. Greer room of Hodges Library. All are welcome to attend.






The American Folklore Society’s Ethnographic Thesaurus

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ethnographicthesaurus.jpg
The American Folklore Society’s Ethnographic Thesaurus

The American Folklore Society is pleased to announce that the
Ethnographic Thesaurus is now available in a dynamically-searchable
draft version on the Society’s website at: http://et.afsnet.org.
The Ethnographic Thesaurus is a hierarchical listing of subject terms
from folklore, ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, and related
fields. The Thesaurus will improve access to cultural materials and scholarship by affording researchers, archivists, indexers, librarians, and others a common language for description..

The link can also be found on the Music Library’s WebLinks page.




New Book Traces Pictorial History of the University of Tennessee

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A deep and forgotten history of UT comes to light

A new book about the University of Tennessee provides images of its 200-year history, from its earliest days as Blount College in 1794 to present. The book, called University of Tennessee was published as part of Arcadia Press’ Campus History Series. It was written by Aaron Purcell, who served as University Archivist from 2000-2007 and earned a PhD in history from UT in 2006.

The book uses photographs from the rich holdings of the University Archives to trace the development of the University of Tennessee. Included are seldom seen images of buildings, students, faculty, famous alumni, campus activities, athletic teams, student and university publications, handwritten documents, and statewide programs in action.

The military heritage of UT, especially the school’s role during the Civil War is detailed, as is information on past university traditions, many of which have been forgotten. The book recounts the importance of the university as a land-grant institution, as per the Morrill Act of 1862, and how that statewide mission of service continues into the twenty-first century.

The university’s role in nationally significant programs like the Summer School of the South are also covered in this book. All campuses and centers across the state, not just the growth and activities of the Knoxville campus, are explored.

All proceeds for the book will be donated to the University Libraries. For more about the book, visit its page at Arcadia Press.




Encyclopedia of American opera.

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ameropera.jpg Wlaschin, Ken.Encyclopedia of American opera.
     Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, 2006.


Ref. ML102.O6 W53 2006

With entries on approximately 750 operas and 1000 individuals, the Encyclopedia of American Opera provides a reference for plot, cast, recordings, videos, and history of American Opera. Recordings are listed from 1893 and list performers, format and brief information about the recording. Includes some cross references.




Compendium in PubMed July 2007—

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The Compendium, formerly titled Compendium on Continuing Education for the Veterinary Practitioner,
has been accepted by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for indexing in PubMed from July 2007 forward.
Veterinary librarians in Missouri and Washington State have worked tirelessly to keep this omission
before the committee at NLM that evaluates journals for indexing.

Issues prior to July 2007 will not be indexed in PubMed unless the publisher, Veterinary Learning Systems or VLS sends the information to the PubMed indexing section. Veterinary librarians have urged the publisher to do so.

If you would like to send a request to the publisher to provide PubMed with the electronic records needed
for indexing, here is the contact info.: EDITORIAL/PRODUCTION/CIRCULATION
Phone: 800-426-9119, Fax: 800-556-3288, Email: info@vetlearn.com