Mozart’s “La Clemenza di Tito”

clemenza.gif La clemenza di Tito [videorecording] : opera seria in two acts (1791) / Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
     Waldron, Heathfield, East Sussex, U.K. : Opus Arte, [2006].


DVD: M1500 .M84 C354 2006.

Commissioned for the coronation of Leopold II in Prague, Mozart’s last opera is a deep, humane reflection on relationships, power and forgiveness. Susan Graham’s most extraordinary Sesto and Christoph Pregardien’s superb Tito set the standard for this riveting Opera National de Paris performance, conducted by the outstanding Sylvain Cambreling. Source: Naxos

UT Libraries Mark Three Anniversaries with ‘Remarkable’ Celebration

The University of Tennessee Libraries is marking three anniversaries this year and inviting students, faculty, staff and the public to a celebration on Oct. 26.

“A Remarkable Time: Celebrating the Past, Anticipating the Future” will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Jack E. Reese Galleria of the John C. Hodges Library.

The celebration will include music, food and a book sale. A program in the auditorium will begin shortly after 6 p.m.

Bruce Wheeler, professor emeritus of history, will speak about the history of the university and, specifically, its libraries. The event will be emceed by Sylvia Peters, teacher, education advocate and founding partner of the Edison Project, which provides curriculum and other educational tools to schools across the U.S. and the United Kingdom.

Bill Bass, professor emeritus of anthropology and founder of “The Body Farm,” will be a special guest and oversee the auctioning off of an opportunity for someone’s name to be used as a character in one of his upcoming novels.

The event is sponsored by the Lancaster Lecture Fund. People interested in attending should RSVP by calling (865) 974-0037.

This year, UT Libraries is marking the 20th anniversary of the renovation of the John C. Hodges Library, the 75th anniversary of the James D. Hoskins Library and the 100th anniversary of UT as a land-grant Federal Depository Library.

“UT Libraries has grown with the University of Tennessee, and in many ways enabled and supported the university’s rise to a major research institution. By celebrating these milestone anniversaries, we can take a moment to remember the many books read, papers and dissertations written and ideas explored here. I am honored to be able to salute the rich past of UT Libraries and look forward to continued enlightenment and discovery,” said Barbara I. Dewey, dean of libraries.

UT Libraries consists of UT Knoxville, College of Law, Preston Medical, UT Health Science Center and UT Space Institute libraries.

Hoskins Library, at first named the Central Library, opened in 1931. The Hodges Undergraduate Library originally opened in 1969 as a four-story building.

As the campus and student enrollment grew, the UT Board of Trustees decided in 1983 to add 250,000 square feet to Hodges Library. The giant renovation — which was largely new construction — began the next year, and the new Hodges reopened in 1987 as the state’s largest library. Construction cost about $29 million.

In 1907, UT’s small library was located in the Old College building, but even as it opened its doors, university officials were planning a new library. Based on the expected growth, the federal government designated UT as a Federal Government Depository, which means the library provides the public free access to government documents and information. In conjunction with this anniversary, the library is holding an essay contest for students. The deadline is Oct. 30. For more information, go to http://www.lib.utk.edu/refs/govdocs100/essay-info.html.

Contacts:

Elizabeth Davis, UT media relations, (865) 974-5179, elizabeth.davis@tennessee.edu

Blue Dean, UT Libraries, (865) 974-0037, bluedean@utk.edu

UT Libraries Mark Three Anniversaries with ‘Remarkable’ Celebration

The University of Tennessee Libraries is marking three anniversaries this year and inviting students, faculty, staff and the public to a celebration on Oct. 26.

“A Remarkable Time: Celebrating the Past, Anticipating the Future” will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Jack E. Reese Galleria of the John C. Hodges Library.

The celebration will include music, food and a book sale. A program in the auditorium will begin shortly after 6 p.m.

Bruce Wheeler, professor emeritus of history, will speak about the history of the university and, specifically, its libraries. The event will be emceed by Sylvia Peters, teacher, education advocate and founding partner of the Edison Project, which provides curriculum and other educational tools to schools across the U.S. and the United Kingdom.

Bill Bass, professor emeritus of anthropology and founder of “The Body Farm,” will be a special guest and oversee the auctioning off of an opportunity for someone’s name to be used as a character in one of his upcoming novels.

The event is sponsored by the Lancaster Lecture Fund. People interested in attending should RSVP by calling (865) 974-0037.

This year, UT Libraries is marking the 20th anniversary of the renovation of the John C. Hodges Library, the 75th anniversary of the James D. Hoskins Library and the 100th anniversary of UT as a land-grant Federal Depository Library.

“UT Libraries has grown with the University of Tennessee, and in many ways enabled and supported the university’s rise to a major research institution. By celebrating these milestone anniversaries, we can take a moment to remember the many books read, papers and dissertations written and ideas explored here. I am honored to be able to salute the rich past of UT Libraries and look forward to continued enlightenment and discovery,” said Barbara I. Dewey, dean of libraries.

UT Libraries consists of UT Knoxville, College of Law, Preston Medical, UT Health Science Center and UT Space Institute libraries.

Hoskins Library, at first named the Central Library, opened in 1931. The Hodges Undergraduate Library originally opened in 1969 as a four-story building.

As the campus and student enrollment grew, the UT Board of Trustees decided in 1983 to add 250,000 square feet to Hodges Library. The giant renovation — which was largely new construction — began the next year, and the new Hodges reopened in 1987 as the state’s largest library. Construction cost about $29 million.

In 1907, UT’s small library was located in the Old College building, but even as it opened its doors, university officials were planning a new library. Based on the expected growth, the federal government designated UT as a Federal Government Depository, which means the library provides the public free access to government documents and information. In conjunction with this anniversary, the library is holding an essay contest for students. The deadline is Oct. 30. For more information, go to http://www.lib.utk.edu/refs/govdocs100/essay-info.html.

Contacts:

Elizabeth Davis, UT media relations, (865) 974-5179, elizabeth.davis@tennessee.edu

Blue Dean, UT Libraries, (865) 974-0037, bluedean@utk.edu

Highlander Film Series

highlander.jpg

The University Libraries invites the university and local communities to learn more about the Highlander Research and Education Center as it celebrates its 75th anniversary. All programs in the Documentaries in Library series will be on Tuesday evenings at the Hodges Library’s Lindsay Young Auditorium from 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM and are free and open to the public. The programs feature a documentary film showing and discussion lead by filmmakers, Highlander activists, and UT faculty.

Upcoming film on Tuesday, Sept. 18: You Got to Move. Discussion Leader: Pam McMichael, Highlander Director
You Got to Move illustrates various efforts at social community organizations to effect change including the civil rights education projects at Highlander, and citizen’s actions against toxic waste dumping and strip mining in Kentucky and Tennessee.

http://www.lib.utk.edu/mediacenter/docs/index.htm

Impromptu


impromptu.jpg Impromptu.
     Santa Monica, CA : MGM Home Entertainment, c2005.


DVD: M1500 .S663 I47 1999

Romantic comedy featuring Hugh Grant (Frederic Chopin), Judy Davis (George Sand), and Emma Thompson (Dutchess D’Antan). Brazenly forward George Sand and frail, romantic Frederic Chopin are drawn together as lovers by an unnerving bond that cannot be broken despite the best efforts of those around them to keep them apart. Color, 108 minutes.

East Tennessee History Center Event

ethc.jpg East Tennessee Television History:
Highlights From Classic Knoxville Television Programs

Friday Sept. 14, 2007 – 7pm – FREE – East TN History Center, 601 Gay St, Knoxville

Here’s your chance to revisit those wonderful days of locally-produced television programs compiled using rare videotapes from the collection of the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound. Many of these shows featured country music entertainment supplied by regional musicians to attract viewers. For almost three decades, Knoxville television stations produced a variety of programs that reflected the rich musical traditions and humor of the East Tennessee region. The show will feature rare commercials, comedy routines, appearances by Barbara Mandrell, Freddie Hart, and a host of regional music acts in a screening of long-unavailable video clips shot right here in Knoxville.

Also: rare footage of Mary Costa

ProTools workshop in Hodges Studio

protools1.gif Beyond GarageBand: Introduction to ProTools.
Taught by Matt Jordan of the Music Library, this class is designed to introduce participants to Pro Tools, an industry standard audio recording software. This hour long class, on October 3 from 4:00-5:00 in Room 251 of Hodges Library, will be a discussion and demonstration only. Although there is not a hands-on section, attendees should gain a basic understanding of the software.
Click here for more information and to register.