Springtime Serenade

Posted on


We would like to invite you to attend our Springtime Serenade on Saturday, March 31st at 6:00PM at The Orangery. Join us for an evening of music, fine dining, dancing, and a silent auction to benefit student scholarships at the School of Music.

Single tickets are $150 per person and Impressario Patron tickets are $200 per person. Checks may be made out to: The University of Tennessee. If you are interested in attending please R.S.V.P. to (865) 974-8935 as soon as possible.

Reception 6:00PM
Jazz Trio with Mark Boling, Keith Brown, & Rusty Holloway
Start of the Silent Auction.

Lyrical Appetizer 6:45PM
Trombone Choir

Dinner 7:00PM
Entertainment featuring the following student talents:
String Trio
Saxophone Quartet
Opera Theatre

Dancing 8:30PM til 11:30PMb
Swirl around the dance floor to delightful jazz tunes.






Student Authors to Read at Writers in the Library

Posted on


Writers in the Library features award-winning creative writing students on April 16

Students in UT’s Creative Writing Program compete annually for the John C. Hodges Graduate Writing Prizes in fiction and poetry. This year’s award-winning students will read at Writers in the Library at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 16, in the John C. Hodges Library auditorium. The prizes were endowed by the same long-time UT English professor, author of the Harbrace College Handbook, for whom the Hodges Library is named.

Author of Harbrace Handbook made significant contributions to University Libraries, English lit

Dr. John C. Hodges came to UT Knoxville in 1921 and was named head of the English department in 1938, remaining in that position until his retirement in 1962.

His enthusiastic commitment to learning did not end with retirement, however. Three years earlier he had begun the task of improving the university’s library collection, and he continued to serve voluntarily as coordinator of library development until his death in 1967.

His 41 years at the University were marked by far-reaching contributions to the study of English literature and the improvement of educational methods. Dr. Hodges’ influence on the teaching of English continues today through his Harbrace College Handbook, the most widely used college text in the country.

The current John C. Hodges Main Library, which opened in 1987, was constructed around the John C. Hodges Undergraduate Library built in 1969.






Robert Krulwich lecture

Posted on


krulwich.jpg Monday, March 26, 8:00p.m. in the University Center’s Shiloh Room: The College of Communication and Information’s Alfred and Julia Hill science writing lecture hosts Robert Krulwich, Emmy-winning ABC and National Public Radio correspondent. Topic: “What a Reporter Learns from Dylan, Coltrane, and Chumbawamba — Journalism as Music.” For more info call 974-8156.

http://www.utk.edu/news/article.php?id=4053




Distinguished Lecture Series With A. J. Racy and Souhail Kaspar

Posted on


Lecture Demonstration: Fri., March 30th from 1:30-2:30PM
Concert: Fri., March 30th at 7:30PM

The School of Music is excited to announce that the Distinguished Lecture Series sponsored by the Musicology area will be hosting Ali Jihad Racy (‘Ud, Ney, & Violin) and Souhail Kaspar (tabla & riqq) for a Lecture Demonstration titled “Melody, Rhythm, and Emotion in Arab Music” on Friday, March 30, 2007 from 1:30-2:30 PM in the Band Room of the Music Building followed by a Concert titled “Musical Legacies: An Evening with Masters of Arab Music” at 7:30 PM in Rm. 32 of the Alumni Memorial Building.
This event is FREE and open to the general public. Sponsors include: the Haines-Morris Grant, School of Music, Dept. of History, Center for International Education, Arab American Club of Knoxville, MARCO Institute, Arts and Sciences Outreach, and the Ramallah Club of Knoxville.

You can also download the flier.




University of Tennessee Special Collections Library acquires rare invitation to Sam Houston’s 1829 wedding

Posted on


The Special Collections Library at the University of Tennessee recently purchased a copy of an invitation to the sudden January 1829 wedding of then-Tennessee governor Sam Houston and Eliza Allen. This rare item may be only one of its kind.

Aaron Purcell, university archivist, discovered the piece on eBay.com and purchased the invitation on February 14, 2007, just over 178 years after the wedding date. The invitation was kept by descendants of one of the wedding guests for five generations.

Sam Houston is an important figure in Tennessee’s history, serving as governor from 1827-1829 and representing the state in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1823-1827. Born in Lexington, Virginia, in 1793, his family moved to Maryville, Tennessee, in 1806. Houston joined the army in 1813 and fought at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814. There he caught the attention of Andrew Jackson. Jackson became Houston’s mentor and helped guide his political career.

While governor, Houston briefly courted 18-year-old Eliza Allen, daughter of a wealthy Gallatin, Tennessee, businessman. On January 15, 1829, the couple mailed a handful of invitations to a small January 22nd wedding at the Allen family home. It is one of these few invitations that UT was able to purchase.

The invitation UT acquired is addressed to Miss Harriet Roulstone, the daughter of George Roulstone, who in 1791 founded the Knoxville Gazette, the state’s first newspaper.

Shortly after the ceremony, the newlyweds were at odds. After 11 weeks, Eliza Allen left her husband and returned to her family’s home in Gallatin. There are many theories as to why the marriage was so short-lived, but none are substantiated. Allen burned all of her letters regarding the relationship and Houston was reluctant to speak about his brief marriage.

The invitation gives few details about the wedding, but the piece remained in the Roulstone family for many years, tucked in a trunk with other important family papers.

Shortly after his marriage dissolved, Houston resigned his position as governor and fled to Indian Territory. He married a Cherokee woman and became a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Houston returned to public service in Texas, serving as president of the Republic of Texas, U.S. senator, and making several failed presidential runs. He died in 1863, leaving behind a complex legacy.

“Sam Houston materials are exceedingly rare and expensive,” Purcell said. UT holds only one other Houston item in its collections, a letter to Colonel Ramsey, dated February 1829. Both items are available for research use in the Special Collections Library at 1401 Cumberland Avenue.

About the Special Collections Library
The University of Tennessee Special Collections Library was founded in 1960 and resides in the historic James D. Hoskins Library building. Materials in special collections include manuscripts, books and other rare materials for research use. For more information, contact the library at (865) 974-4480 or visit www.lib.utk.edu/spcoll/.




University of Tennessee Special Collections Library acquires rare invitation to Sam Houston’s 1829 wedding

Posted on


The Special Collections Library at the University of Tennessee recently purchased a copy of an invitation to the sudden January 1829 wedding of then-Tennessee governor Sam Houston and Eliza Allen. This rare item may be only one of its kind.

Aaron Purcell, university archivist, discovered the piece on eBay.com and purchased the invitation on February 14, 2007, just over 178 years after the wedding date. The invitation was kept by descendants of one of the wedding guests for five generations.

Sam Houston is an important figure in Tennessee’s history, serving as governor from 1827-1829 and representing the state in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1823-1827. Born in Lexington, Virginia, in 1793, his family moved to Maryville, Tennessee, in 1806. Houston joined the army in 1813 and fought at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814. There he caught the attention of Andrew Jackson. Jackson became Houston’s mentor and helped guide his political career.

While governor, Houston briefly courted 18-year-old Eliza Allen, daughter of a wealthy Gallatin, Tennessee, businessman. On January 15, 1829, the couple mailed a handful of invitations to a small January 22nd wedding at the Allen family home. It is one of these few invitations that UT was able to purchase.

The invitation UT acquired is addressed to Miss Harriet Roulstone, the daughter of George Roulstone, who in 1791 founded the Knoxville Gazette, the state’s first newspaper.

Shortly after the ceremony, the newlyweds were at odds. After 11 weeks, Eliza Allen left her husband and returned to her family’s home in Gallatin. There are many theories as to why the marriage was so short-lived, but none are substantiated. Allen burned all of her letters regarding the relationship and Houston was reluctant to speak about his brief marriage.

The invitation gives few details about the wedding, but the piece remained in the Roulstone family for many years, tucked in a trunk with other important family papers.

Shortly after his marriage dissolved, Houston resigned his position as governor and fled to Indian Territory. He married a Cherokee woman and became a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Houston returned to public service in Texas, serving as president of the Republic of Texas, U.S. senator, and making several failed presidential runs. He died in 1863, leaving behind a complex legacy.

“Sam Houston materials are exceedingly rare and expensive,” Purcell said. UT holds only one other Houston item in its collections, a letter to Colonel Ramsey, dated February 1829. Both items are available for research use in the Special Collections Library at 1401 Cumberland Avenue.

About the Special Collections Library
The University of Tennessee Special Collections Library was founded in 1960 and resides in the historic James D. Hoskins Library building. Materials in special collections include manuscripts, books and other rare materials for research use. For more information, contact the library at (865) 974-4480 or visit www.lib.utk.edu/spcoll/.




UT Libraries Focuses on Civil Rights in East Tennessee

Posted on


UT Documentaries in the Library to present film about the Clinton 12

The UT Libraries will show the film Clinton and the Law: Desegregation in Clinton, TN with remarks from a Clinton High School student who lived through the experience as part of their Documentaries in the Libraries series. The event will be held on April 4 at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of Hodges Library and is free and open to the public.

In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Brown vs. Board of Education ended legal segregation in public schools. In January 1956, Federal District Court Judge Robert Taylor was forced to overturn his own earlier ruling and mandated Clinton High School to desegregate by the fall semester of 1956.

On August 27, 1956, Clinton High School became the first public, all-white high school in the Southeast to enroll black students. In all, twelve black children enrolled in the high school that year, in the face of protests, violence and media scrutiny.

Alfred Williams, one of the “Clinton 12,” will join in the discussion session after the film. Robert Willis, one of the last Clinton residents bussed to Austin-East High School in Knoxville and Alan Jones, pastor of the Asbury United Methodist Church in Clinton and an accomplished artist, will also participate. The evening’s discussion will be led by Susan Williams (no relation) from the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, TN.

The film Clinton and the Law was produced by legendary journalist Edward R. Murrow as part of his See It Now series on CBS. Selections from You Got To Move, a documentary about working toward union, civil, environmental and women’s rights in the South, will also be shown.

UT Libraries’ Documentaries in the Library series is exploring aspects of Appalachia through film and video during the spring 2007 semester. More information about the series can be found at www.lib.utk.edu/mediacenter/docs/.