Skip to content

News & Events

Writers in the Library: Ali Cobby Eckermann 3/26

On Monday, March 26, poet Ali Cobby Eckermann will read as part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. Ali Cobby Eckermann is a Yankunytjatjara Aboriginal poet from Adelaide, Australia who is the author of seven books, including the verse novel Ruby Moonlight, the poetry collections Inside My Mother and Love Dreaming & Other Poems, as well as the memoir Too Afraid to Cry.

In 2017, Eckermann was awarded the Windham-Campbell Prize from Yale University. The Guardian, in discussing Eckermann’s poetry, states:

“Ali Cobby Eckermann is a survivor of the stolen generations as her mother was before her. Both stolen women, their stories and histories are mirrors of the worst kind . . . . It is Eckermann’s continuing and consistent language of forgiveness and compassion in the face of such unimaginable trauma that truly inspires.”

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.  

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@nullutk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.

###

Facebook: Writers.in.the.Library
Twitter: utklibwriters

PowerNotes: Organize and save your online research

PowerNotes is a great way to gather, organize, and keep track of your online research.

The UT Libraries has purchased a trial subscription that gives members of the UT Knoxville community free access to PowerNotes. To get started, visit powernotes.com and download/install the PowerNotes extension into your Chrome browser. Create a free account using your utk.edu email.

Then you’re ready to launch a project. You can build and edit an outline as you conduct research.

When you find web content relevant to your research project, click on the PowerNotes icon and log-in. You can then:

  • Highlight it: Highlight text to add a snippet to the outline for your research project.
  • Choose a topic: Assign snippets to categories that you create as you work.
  • Add notes, if you wish.
  • Harvest citations, which you can then upload to a citation manager.
  • Transfer your outline and notes to a Word file.

You can save, annotate, organize, and track multiple research projects. PowerNotes keeps track of the source URL for each snippet. (This works for most websites — Facebook, Gmail, and Google Docs are notable exceptions.)

*** The trial subscription ends in June — so backup your projects! ***

More information:
libguides.utk.edu/powernotes
www.blog.powernotes.com/help

If you would like to recommend or comment on PowerNotes, contact librarian Charissa Powell, cpowel27@nullutk.edu.

Now showing: indie film “The Automatic Hate,” March 7

Join us at Hodges Library for free screenings of independent and foreign films. Feature films will be screened at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium on the first Wednesday of each month, throughout the fall and spring semesters.

Showing
Wednesday, March 7,
at 7 p.m.

The Automatic Hate

When Davis Green’s alluring young cousin Alexis appears on his doorstep one night, he discovers that a side of his family has been kept secret from him. Against his father’s wishes, Davis travels to rural, upstate New York to meet his other cousins. While wrestling with a taboo attraction to one another, he and Alexis attempt to reunite their families, uncovering the reasons behind a long-standing rift and the shocking secret that tore their fathers apart. Together, their discoveries force them to confront the temptation to keep their familial grudge going rather than end it.

For more information, contact librarian Michael Deike at mdeike@nullutk.edu.

It’s Open Education Week. Instructors: Consider adopting an open textbook.

This week, March 5-9, is Open Education Week, and we’re celebrating open educational resources. Open educational resources (OERs) are freely accessible, openly licensed text, media, and other digital assets that are useful for teaching and learning. Open textbooks are one type of OER.

Open Textbooks

Just two years ago, we knew that one course had adopted an open textbook. An instructor of select sections of another course had adopted an open textbook, too. Students were saving an estimated $155,000 in the academic year.

Since joining the Open Textbook Network in 2016, seven courses (and eight instructors teaching individual sections of other courses) have open textbook adoptions. Because some of these new adoptions are in high-enrollment courses, we’ve almost quintupled the number of students impacted by open textbooks. Students are saving an estimated $740,000 this year!

Million Dollar Goal

The Office of the Provost and the Student Government Association have a goal to save students $1 Million with open textbooks over the 2017-18 academic year. The UT Libraries and the SGA have been keeping a tally of savings to students. This list includes all known open textbook adoptions. Now, we need your help — let us know if you are teaching with an open textbook: s.lib.utk.edu/opened.

SGA Open Education Award

Last year, the Student Government Association worked with the UT Libraries to launch an award recognizing instructors who use open educational resources, including free and openly licensed textbooks. Students, nominate your instructor for the SGA Open Education Award now.

Faculty Choices

You can listen to a Geography 101 instructor talk about his experience adopting and teaching with an open textbook at a recent OIT Community of Practice meeting. Learn more about the differences between open textbooks and books that are available in the Inclusive Access program.

Lunch & Learn: Gender and Politics 3/8; Consent 4/5

ll_smallThe UT Libraries Diversity Committee hosts a series of lunchtime discussions to facilitate comfortable dialog about diversity and inclusion. Lunch and Learn invites students and other members of the campus community to talk openly but respectfully about complex issues that impact their lives and their campus experience.

Join us for two workshops this spring:

Gender and Politics
Noon – 1:30 p.m., Thursday, March 8 (International Women’s Day)
Mary Greer Room (258 Hodges Library)

A facilitated panel discussion co-hosted by the Women’s Coordinating Council and the UT Libraries Diversity Committee. Our panel will feature political scientists, politicians, and activists discussing the interactions between identity and politics.


Having Difficult Conversations on Consent
Noon – 1:30 p.m., Thursday, April 5
Mary Greer Room (258 Hodges Library)

Consent means an active agreement to participate in sexual contact or sexual penetration. Fletcher Haverkamp and Bilqis Amatus-Salaam will facilitate a conversation on the words or conduct that communicate a person’s willingness to participate in sexual contact.

Fletcher Haverkamp serves as the Sexual Violence Prevention Coordinator for the Center for Health Education and Wellness. Fletcher was a co-author of the OVW Campus Grant and serves as the Project Coordinator for the grant. Prior to his current role, Fletcher worked at Catholic Charities Columbus Home Group Home for boys and as Graduate Assistant for the Center for Health Education and Wellness where he facilitated alcohol and other drug programs, sexual violence prevention programs, and conducted data assessment.

Bilqis Amatus-Salaam is the Wellness Coordinator for General Wellness Promotion at the Center for Health Education and Wellness. She completed her Master’s in Public Health in 2015 with a focus on sexual health and college student health. In her role at UT she focuses on cold and flu prevention, stress reduction, sleep promotion, nutrition, and sexual health.

Paper Due Soon? Join Our “Writing Blitz” March 8

Writing papers got you down? Not sure how or where to start your research? Join us for a “Writing Blitz” in Hodges Library on Thursday, March 8, from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., in Room 213.

Work surrounded by others with the same goal in mind: FINISH THOSE PAPERS!

From pencils to laptops to citation guides — resources will be readily available to help you tackle those papers. Free-roaming librarians will be on hand to assist with reference questions. The Writing Center will be in the house as well to help you through the writing process. Refreshments and take-a-break activities will also be available to keep you energized and motivated.

Jill Bialosky at Writers in the Library, Feb. 26

On Monday, February 26, poet and editor Jill Bialosky will read as part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series.

Jill Bialosky is the author of four acclaimed collections of poetry, most recently The Players; three critically acclaimed novels, most recently, The Prize; and a New York Times bestselling memoir, History of a Suicide: My Sister’s Unfinished Life. Her poems and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s, O Magazine, The Kenyon Review, Harvard Review, and Paris Review, among others. She co-edited with Helen Schulman the anthology Wanting a Child.

Bialosky is an Executive Editor and Vice President at W. W. Norton & Company. In 2014 she was honored by the Poetry Society of America for her distinguished contribution to poetry.

Jill Bialosky’s newest memoir, Poetry Will Save Your Life, looks at poetry as a means of working through personal loss and tragedy. Of the book, The Washington Post states that it “demonstrates how poems can become an integral part of life. It also suggests, on every page, the wisdom and deep compassion that make Bialosky a longtime editor at W. W. Norton, a tremendous asset both to readers and other writers.”

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. 

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. 

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@nullutk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.

###

Facebook: Writers.in.the.Library
Twitter: utklibwriters

Writers in the Library: Meagan Cass, March 19

On Monday, March 19, fiction writer Meagan Cass will read as part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. Meagan Cass’s first full-length collection, ActivAmerica, published by University of North Texas Press in 2017, won the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction. She is also author of the chapbook Range of Motion (Magic Helicopter Press, 2014), and her stories have appeared in Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Pinch, DIAGRAM, PANK, Joyland, and Puerto del Sol, among many others. Dan Chaon selected her fiction for the Wigleaf Top 50 Short Fictions of 2012, and Smokelong Quarterly republished her story “Egg Toss, August 1989” in its Best of the First Ten Years anthology.

Cass is an Assistant Editor at Sundress Publications and has served as fiction coordinator for the Best of the Net Anthology and fiction editor for Rougarou and for Stirring. An associate professor of English at the University of Illinois Springfield, she teaches courses in creative writing, publishing, and 20th/21st-century American literature and curates the Shelterbelt Reading Series. Her degrees include an MFA in fiction from Sarah Lawrence College and a doctorate in English from the University of Louisiana Lafayette. She lives in St. Louis, Missouri.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.

There will be a brown bag Q&A for students and faculty at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.  

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@nullutk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.

###

Facebook: Writers.in.the.Library
Twitter: utklibwriters

Writers in the Library: Erin Elizabeth Smith, March 5

On Monday, March 5, poet Erin Elizabeth Smith will read as part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. Erin Elizabeth Smith is the Creative Director at the Sundress Academy for the Arts and the Managing Editor of Sundress Publications and The Wardrobe. She is the author of two full-length collections, The Naming of Strays (Gold Wake, 2011) and The Fear of Being Found (Three Candles, 2007). Her third collection, Down: The Alice Poems, will be released by Agape Editions in 2019.

Smith is the editor of two anthologies, Political Punch: Contemporary Poems on the Politics of Identity and Not Somewhere Else But Here: Contemporary Poems on Women and Place, and her poems have appeared in numerous journals, including Ecotone, Mid-American, Crab Orchard Review, Cimarron Review, and Willow Springs, among others. She holds a PhD in Creative Writing from the Center for Writers at the University of Southern Mississippi and teaches in the English Department at the University of Tennessee, where she is also the UT Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence. In 2017, Erin Elizabeth Smith was inducted into the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.  

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@nullutk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.

###

Facebook: Writers.in.the.Library
Twitter: utklibwriters

The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System and partner in the Tennessee Transfer Pathway.