The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

University Libraries

Research hint: Virtual browsing

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There’s nothing like the serendipity of browsing the stacks and discovering that one book that is the perfect reference on your topic.

Well, actually, there is. Now there’s virtual browsing in the Libraries’ online catalog.

If the search box on the Libraries’ homepage leads you to a promising title, you can browse adjacent titles in the call number sequence.

After initiating a search, you should see the Virtual Browse tab listed on the brief record for any title having a call number.

Click Virtual Browse to view a virtual shelf of book covers. The virtual bookshelf allows you to browse up to 100 items to the left and right of the entry. The bookshelf displays items in the call number sequence regardless of library location. That’s even better than browsing the stacks!

VirtualBrowse

You can also browse through an alphabetic list of all titles, authors, or Library of Congress subject headings from the Libraries’ catalog. Select the Browse Search option at the top of the results page.

BrowseSearch
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These new features are part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.




During final exams: longer hours and “de-stress” activities

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During finals, campus libraries will be open additional hours and will offer activities to help students “de-stress.” De-Stress For Success activities are sponsored by the UT Libraries, UT Graduate Student Senate, the Student Success Center, UT’s Thornton Athletics Student Life Center, and Threds.

tie-dye 11x17EXTENDED HOURS

Hodges Library:
All floors of Hodges Library will be open continuously from noon, Sunday, April 27, until midnight on Tuesday, May 6.

Pendergrass Agriculture & Veterinary Medicine Library:
Mon., April 28 – Thurs., May 1 — 7:30 am – midnight
Fri., May 2 — 7:30 am – 8 pm
Sat., May 3 — 9 am – 8 pm
Sun., May 4 — noon – midnight
Mon., May 5 — 7:30 am – midnight
Tues., May 6 — 7:30 am – 6 pm

George F. DeVine Music Library:
Sat., April 26 — 10 am – 7 pm
Sun., April 27 — 2 pm – 11 pm
Mon., April 28 – Thurs., May 1 — 8 am – 11 pm
Fri., May 2 — 8 am – 5 pm
Sat., May 3 — 10 am – 7 pm
Sun., May 4 — 2 pm – 11 pm
Mon., May 5 — 8 am – 11 pm
Tues., May 6 — 8 am – 6 pm

DE-STRESS FOR SUCCESS

***New de-stress activity this semester: Tie-Die workshop at the Presidential Courtyard, Monday, April 28, from 11 am to 2 pm***

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Watch for our super-fun photo booth!

The Hodges and Pendergrass libraries will host a number of activities to help students who are feeling overwhelmed by final exams. Both Hodges Library and Pendergrass Agriculture & Veterinary Medicine Library will have HABIT (Human Animal Bond in Tennessee) therapy dogs on hand during finals week.

At Hodges Library, staff will give out health and well-being tips, healthy snacks, and “Power-T Nap” sleep masks (as long as supplies last). SAIS (Student Assessment of Instruction System) will hand out popsicles for an energy boost on Study Day. Ongoing activities include games, cartoons, and coloring books in Room 251, Hodges Library. And watch for our free Photo Booth in Hodges Library, 2-4 pm, on April 30 and May 1.

Pendergrass AgVetMed Library will offer snacks, board games, jigsaw puzzles, crafts, and some outside activities like corn hole toss.

Here’s the full schedule:

De-Stress Calendar6




Research hint: Grab the formatted citation

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Citing references in your research paper? The easiest way to format a citation in the prescribed style may be to grab the citation from the Libraries’ catalog. If UT owns the item and there’s a record in the catalog, you can access a formatted citation from the brief record display (results from using the search box on the Libraries’ homepage).

Click the Details tab under the item’s brief record. Choose “Citation” from the Actions dropdown menu in the upper right of the Details box. Formatting options include the American Psychological Association, Modern Language Association, and Chicago/Turabian styles.

ActionsDropdown

styles

To format journal article citations, use a citation management tool like Zotero or EndNote.
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This new feature is part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.




Did you know about…. Browzine? — Browse Journals on Mobile Devices

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The UT Libraries has an app for you:  BrowZine lets you browse and read journals in a format that is optimized for tablet devices.

The BrowZine app is available for the iPad and Android devices.

To get started, just search for “BrowZine” in the app store on your device. Simply register your NetID and password, and you’ll have access to all the UT Libraries’ electronic journals (issues back to 2005) and lots of useful features.

BrowZine users can create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals, be alerted when new editions of journals are published, and easily save to Zotero, Dropbox, and other services.

Remember to update your password with BrowZine whenever you change your NetID password.

If you have further questions, contact Gayle Baker at the UT Libraries (865-974-3519, gsbaker@utk.edu)).




Pendergrass Library: Now Hiring

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The Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library is seeking a student library assistants (SLAs) for the 2014-2015 academic year. We are looking for students dedicated to providing good public service, a strong work ethic, and working in a collaborative environment with patrons and library staff. Please visit lib.utk.edu/employment for more detailed position descriptions and application instructions.




New Equipment at Pendergrass!

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Pendergrass Library has just added some additional equipment to our collection.  We now have 2 TI-84 Plus graphing calculators, which check out for 2 hours.  We have also added 5 more sets of headphones, and these check out for 24 hours.  All equipment accrues a $0.25/hour fine if returned late.  If you need either of these items, please stop by the desk with your Vol card and ask to borrow one.




Student Winners of Graduate Writing Awards to Read, April 14

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The University of Tennessee’s final Writers in the Library event of the academic year will feature readings by student winners of the John C. Hodges Graduate Writing Awards. Readings from the winning works will take place in the Hodges Library auditorium on Monday, April 14, at 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Awards are made possible by the English Department through the John C. Hodges Better English Fund, endowed by the long-time UT English professor and author of the Harbrace College Handbook, for whom the Hodges Library also is named.

2014 winners of the John C. Hodges Graduate Writing Awards:

FICTION


First Prize: Genna Gazelka, for “As Chickadees Fall”
Second Prize: Michael Shou-Yung Shum, for “The Disappearance of Herman Grimes”
Third Prize: Katherine Ann Davis, “My Collector,” novel excerpt
Honorable Mention: Richard Hermes, “The Rubber Tapper’s Knife”

POETRY


First Prize: Jake Ward, for “Lucy Goes to the Hospital and never returns”
Second Prize: Ben McClendon, for “Habitat for Humanity” and other poems
Third Prize: Christian Anton Gerard, for “The Poet Thinking He’s Milton’s Adam,” and other poems

Honorable mentions:
Stephanie Dugger, for “Mid-August Meteor Shower, Vedauwoo, WY,” and other poems
Jonathan Brehm, for “I’m a Pigeon,” and other poems
Andrew Dillon, for “Viscosity” and other poems

First, second, and third place winners will read at the April 14 Writers in the Library event. Winners receive $500 for First Prize, $300 for Second Prize, and $100 for Third Prize in each category. This year’s judges were Dr. Martin Griffin for fiction and Dr. Kristi Maxwell for poetry.

The public is invited to join the university community for readings by these accomplished, up-and-coming writers.
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the University of Tennessee Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@utk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@utk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Comprehensive Bibliography of the Smokies Now Available

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TerraThe culmination of fifteen years of research, Terra Incognita: An Annotated Bibliography of the Great Smoky Mountains, 1544-1934 is the most comprehensive bibliography of sources related to the Great Smoky Mountains ever created. The book is now available for purchase from the University of Tennessee Press.

Terra Incognita catalogs printed material on the Great Smoky Mountains from the earliest map documenting the De Soto expedition in the 16th century to writings that were instrumental in the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each chapter, introduced by a substantive essay, details published works on a different aspect of the history, peoples, culture, and natural history of the Smokies region. There are chapters, for instance, on the Cherokee, early explorers, music, mountain life, and the national park movement.

The authoritative and meticulously researched work is an indispensable reference for scholars and students studying any aspect of the region’s past. According to author and historian Jim Casada, “Terra Incognita belongs in every academic library in the country and locals who simply cherish the Smokies will want to have it on their shelves.”

The title for the bibliography comes from a remark by Horace Kephart, an early twentieth-century chronicler of mountain culture and an important force behind the founding of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Researching the region prior to his first visit in 1904, Kephart found the Great Smoky Mountains to be a “terra incognita.” Little to nothing, it seemed, could be found in libraries to elucidate the land or its people. This new bibliography rectifies that omission by bringing together the scattered and obscure early accounts of the Smokies. (Kephart is the only individual to merit a separate chapter in Terra Incognita.)

Terra Incognita was compiled and edited by three librarians. Anne Bridges and Ken Wise are associate professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries and co-directors of the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project (www.lib.utk.edu/smokies). Russell Clement, emeritus faculty at Northwestern University, worked for many years in academic libraries, most recently as head of the art collection at Northwestern.

An online database, Database of the Smokies (dots.lib.utk.edu), updates Terra Incognita with citations to material published since 1934, the date the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established.

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Contact:

Anne Bridges, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-0017, abridges@utk.edu)

Ken Wise, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-2359, kwise@utk.edu)

Ordering information: http://utpress.org






Cats staff the research desk — purrfect! (Well, maybe…)

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Room209_cat2We at the UT Libraries pride ourselves on being innovators. But, as it says in Proverbs, pride goeth before a fall . . . or, in this instance, before a face full of claws.

It seemed like a good idea at the time. I mean, cats are all over the Internet, playing pianos, doing everything humans do. We thought, why not? Why not staff the Research Assistance Desk entirely with cats?

I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely apologize to those who have sustained injuries.

From the beginning, staffing at the service desk could only be described as, uh, “independent scheduling”: some cat-librarians didn’t deign to show up for desk hours.

Admittedly, we began getting complaints almost immediately. I received this note from a student early on:

“I was halfway through explaining my thesis on the Middle Kingdom of pharaonic Egypt. I thought the librarian (I believe her name was Miss Kitty) would at least be curious. But she interrupted to tell me how SHE used to be worshipped as a god in ancient Egypt. What a narcissistic diva!”

Library users have variously described our new librarians as “moody,” “haughty,” “inscrutable,” “grumpy.” In other words, the new librarians have not exactly cozied up to our service philosophy. Again, I apologize.

And, of course, things quickly escalated. Here’s another complaint:

“The incident in question took me totally by surprise. ‘Tom’ was conducting a database search for me. All of a sudden his eyes glazed over. He began twitching — then rhythmically thumping — his tail. He just went berserk! I hope these stitches don’t leave scars.”

I can only state . . . Bad kitty! (Regrettably, the rules of tenure preclude any further disciplinary action.) So, if you have a complaint about the level of service in the research assistance area, please fill out a suggestion form, roll it into a ball, and toss it into the room.

And have a HAPPY APRIL FOOL’S DAY!

Sincerely,
Steve Smith
Dean of Libraries





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