The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

University Libraries

Privacy Badger Stops Ads & Trackers

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Privacy Badger is a new, free browser add-on created by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.  It stops advertisers and other third-party trackers from secretly tracking what pages you visit online.  If an advertiser seems to be tracking you across multiple Web sites without your permission, Privacy Badger automatically blocks that advertiser from loading any more content in your browser.  It is an alternative to other browser add-ons (such as Disconnect, Adblock Plus, Ghostery, etc.) that require custom configuration by the user to block non-consensual trackers.  Privacy Badger seeks to give users maximal control over who does and doesn’t get to know what they do online.

Digital privacy and security are essential skills for academic professionals across all disciplines.  Shielding yourself from unwanted advertisements is convenient, but stopping tracking also means that your metadata is better protected from potential avenues of attack or theft.  Visit Privacy Badger’s Web site to download the extension or find out more about the add-on, how it works, and the EFF’s development plan for it.  Please note that Privacy Badger currently supports only Chrome and Firefox browsers.




Attention, student artists: library seeks works for juried exhibition

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Koczo400xThe UT Libraries is seeking student artworks for the Student Art in the Library juried exhibition. The contest awards a First Prize of $300, Second Prize of $150, and Third Prize of $75. Selected two-dimensional works (drawings, graphic design, prints, photography, ceramics, painting) will be on display in the exhibit area during the fall semester. The contest is open to all currently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students, in any discipline. Submission deadline is midnight, September 21.

More info at lib.utk.edu/artinlibrary.




Music Library Reopening

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After a month of upgrading our shelving, the George F. DeVine Music Library will be reopening at 8:00am on August 1st. Come check out our new and improved compact shelving and media storage! The shelving will now be open to the public. There’s no need to wait around for library staff to retrieve your items for you.




Hodges Library to close at 9 pm, July 23, due to electrical outage

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The John C. Hodges Library will close at 9 p.m. on Wednesday, July 23. A power outage in Hodges Library has been scheduled in order to perform emergency electrical maintenance. All library users will be asked to vacate the building prior to 9 p.m.

Due to the power outage, some online library services will be unavailable overnight.

The building will reopen at 7:30 a.m., Thursday, July 24, as long as all electrical maintenance is completed.




3D printing turns library users into industrial designers

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Last year, the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library added 3D printing to the technology they provide to library users. 3D printing lets designers rapidly turn their ideas into plastic prototypes. Engineering students from the College of Agriculture are using the AgVet library’s 3D printer to test their design ideas.

The library’s IT technologist, Richie Sexton, spearheaded the project to offer 3D printing. A story in today’s Knoxzine features Richie explaining the operation and benefits of 3D printing. Check it out.

[Here are guidelines for 3D printing at the Pendergrass Library.]




Music Library closing temporarily

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The George F. DeVine Music Library (G4 Natalie L. Haslam Music Center) will be closed July 3-31 for upgrades to the library’s compact shelving.

During this time, users may request delivery of Music Library materials by selecting “Request” “Item Pickup or Delivery” from the “Items” record in the library catalog. Please be aware that for a brief period, July 9-14, shelving installation may block access to collections and we may be unable to fulfill requests. We apologize for any inconvenience this closing may cause.

If you have questions concerning the closing or need assistance from Music Library personnel, contact:

Chris Durman (cdurman@utk.edu, 865-974-7542), Music Library Coordinator
Sarah Nelson (snelso29@utk.edu, 865-974-9946), Day Shift Supervisor
Josh Aldorisio (jaldoris@utk.edu, 865-974-3474), Night Shift Supervisor




UT Library Council honors work on master agreements

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Blake Reagan, Micheline Westfall, Corey Halaychik

The University of Tennessee Library Council recently honored three UT staff members for working to streamline the purchase of library materials across UT campuses. Not long ago, Corey Halaychik, Blake Reagan, and Micheline Westfall finalized the one-hundredth “master agreement” with a library vendor.

The UT libraries typically negotiate hundreds of licensing agreements each year with publishers of books, journals, and electronic resources. Many of those agreements are with the same group of publishers, yet each contract must be scrutinized annually by each campus for compliance with state laws and university policies. A master agreement, governing all subsequent purchases from a participating vendor, can eliminate costly hours of contract review and significantly speed up the purchase of library materials.

Over the past year, Halaychik and Westfall, both faculty members in UT Knoxville Libraries’ Licensing, E-Resources, and Serials Department, worked in close collaboration with Reagan, director of Contracts Administration for the University of Tennessee System, to negotiate a series of master agreements with library vendors. The agreements benefit all schools in the UT System and allow each UT library to bypass the yearly contract review process for new and renewed subscriptions. The libraries can now order books, journals, and electronic resources from participating vendors through a simple purchase order. On the Knoxville campus, the library has reduced the number of its vendor contracts by more than half.

In a ceremony on June 4, Sandy Oelschlegel, chair of the UT Library Council and director of UT’s Preston Medical Library, presented a “Resolution of Thanks” to Halaychik, Reagan, and Westfall for their “outstanding service and meaningful contributions to the University of Tennessee libraries and their patrons through the successful negotiation of past and future master agreements.”




Follow Our Leisure Collection Online

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Pendergrass Library is launching a Goodreads account that will allow our patrons to browse titles in our new leisure reading collection remotely. Titles that are part of the collection are listed on the Our Books shelf; titles ordered but not yet received are listed on the Coming Soon shelf. Our Goodreads account is also synced to the library’s Twitter feed. Please follow us as it will help build the social media we hope will support this collection.

This is an evolving collection and will be built in partnership with our community. We are interested in what our patrons want to read and want to ensure that relevant topics and titles are not inadvertently omitted from the collection. Visit the leisure collection page to submit a request. Feel free to ask us if you need any additional help or information!




ChemBioDraw freely available for UT students, faculty, and staff

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What is it?  ChemBioDraw is a drawing tool for chemists and biologists used to create publication-ready, scientifically intelligent drawings for use in ELNs, databases and publications, and for querying chemical databases.

Where can I run it?  ChemBioDraw is available at no extra charge to UTK and UTSI faculty, staff, and students for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs and Macs.  The download and installation instructions are at http://oit.utk.edu/software.  It is also available on OIT’s apps@UT server and on the computers in the OIT public computer labs.

How can I learn it?  To watch webinar videos, read informative articles, and watch feature demos, go to the main web page at http://www.cambridgesoft.com and select Chemistry and then ChemBioDraw.

Where can I get support?  RCS offers minimal support for ChemBioDraw.  For technical support, browse the Cambridgesoft Technical Support site at http://www.cambridgesoft.com/support.  You may also download manuals for free, search, or ask a question in the support forum at http://forums.cambridgesoft.com or contact the support team via the web form at http://www.cambridgesoft.com/contact/support/form.




UT Libraries Acquires Two Historically Significant First Editions

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Two historically important books, acquired by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have been added to the library’s special collections.

Phillis Wheatley was an enslaved person in the household of a prosperous Boston family. Her Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (published 1773) was the first published book by an African-American woman.

Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk* (published 1833) was transcribed and translated into English from the testimony of the Sauk chief who waged war on the United States in 1832. Black Hawk’s Life was one of the first Native American autobiographies published in the United States.

The UT Libraries recently purchased rare first editions of both works. The copy of Wheatley’s Poems is a particularly noteworthy specimen. It contains an extremely rare inscription by the poet herself.

frontispiece
Frontispiece to Phillis Wheatley’s Poems

Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784) was a child of approximately seven years old when she was captured by slavers in west Africa, transported to America, and sold at auction in the slave market of Boston, Massachusetts, to John and Susanna Wheatley. John Wheatley gave her the name of the slave ship, the Phillis, aboard which she had made the grueling Atlantic crossing.

The Wheatley family began tutoring Phillis in English, Latin, and the Bible, and the young slave quickly displayed a facility for learning.

The verses in Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral are filled with classical allusions. Many are elegies to the great men of the day. Her elegy on the death of the popular preacher George Whitefield, published in Boston, Philadelphia, New York, and London when Wheatley was just 17 years old, gained her considerable notoriety. Susanna Wheatley tried to capitalize on her servant’s success to publish the verses but was unable to secure sufficient subscriptions to underwrite the cost of publication in the American colonies.

In the eighteenth century, the intellectual and creative capabilities of Africans were a subject of debate, and the reading public was skeptical of a literary work attributed to a slave. In 1772 Phillis Wheatley was called before a group of Boston’s leading citizens to defend the authenticity of her work.

The august body was convinced of her authorship. The Poems were printed in London and widely acclaimed. Wheatley was feted on two continents and met many notables, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin.

Wheatley was emancipated from slavery in 1773, but her life as a free woman was brief and fraught. She died in childbirth in 1784 at the age of 31.

The 1773 edition of Phillis Wheatley’s poems purchased by the UT Libraries, sadly, is missing the original frontispiece, a rare depiction of an individual female slave — a pensive Wheatley at work on a poem.

Wheatley’s slender volume of poetry, a signal literary achievement by an enslaved African, influenced the discourse on slavery in America.

Black Hawk’s recounting of his life and the Sauk insurrection influenced another debate, over the rights of America’s indigenous peoples.

White settlers began encroaching upon the Sauk nation’s ancestral homelands in the early decades of the nineteenth century, challenging the Sauk’s sovereign right to their land. The Sauk and other tribes living east of the Mississippi River were pushed to lands west of the river.

Chief Black Hawk (1767-1838) and other members of the Sauk questioned the validity of the treaty ostensibly ceding their lands. In 1832, Black Hawk and a group of several hundred men, women, and children attempted to resettle on tribal lands.

Whatever Black Hawk’s intentions, United States officials were convinced that his band was hostile. When Black Hawk sent a peace delegation to meet the approaching army, the three warriors waving a white flag were fired upon. Thus began the brief encounter known as the Black Hawk War. During ensuing skirmishes, Black Hawk’s small band gained several successes before a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Bad Axe. Black Hawk escaped capture at Bad Axe but later surrendered.

Transferred to Fort Monroe in Virginia, Black Hawk and other imprisoned leaders of the uprising were paraded in public — not as reviled enemies but as celebrities. Along the eastern seaboard, far from frontier hostilities, the romanticizing of the “noble savage” was already underway. The prisoners posed for portraits, toured Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York City, and even met briefly with President Andrew Jackson.

After a few months, Black Hawk and the other leaders were released. Black Hawk’s autobiography, dictated to a government interpreter, was published in 1833. It became an instant bestseller, going through five printings within a year.

The Black Hawk first edition also is a scarce treasure.

Katy Chiles, the UT professor who brought the item to the Libraries’ attention, appreciates the cultural significance and research value of both first editions. Her research on early American literatures and print culture studies involves looking at early editions of rare texts and analyzing how each different publication presented itself to readers in different and important ways. “In my work on Black Hawks’ Life, I am investigating how American publishers produced frontispieces, prefaces, and book bindings for the text’s earliest publications to influence the meaning of the War of 1812, the 1832 Black Hawk War, and, more broadly, British, U.S., and Indian relations,” Chiles told librarians when recommending the acquisition. “I also analyze the differences between texts, such as prefaces and frontispieces that play an important role in how ‘the Indian’ is represented. Access to first editions is key to enabling this kind of analysis. Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk is a crucially important book in understanding and appreciating what indigenous peoples have done with print.” Chiles teaches African-American, Native American, and early American literature in the UT Department of English.

Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral and Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk are now available to scholars of American history and literature in the UT Libraries’ Special Collections. The acquisitions complement the UT Libraries’ excellent holdings of early American imprints.

* Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk, embracing the tradition of his nation — Indian wars in which he has been engaged — cause of joining the British in their late war with America, and its history — description of the Rock-River village — manners and customs — encroachments by the whites, contrary to treaty — removal from his village in 1831. With an account of the cause and general history of the late war, his surrender and confinement at Jefferson barracks, and travels through the United States.





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