The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

University Libraries

Big Orange Adventure — a scavenger hunt to benefit the libraries

BigOadventureThe UT Graduate Student Senate will host a scavenger hunt, dubbed “The Big Orange Adventure,” to benefit the UT Libraries. The race will take place Saturday, April 5, 2014, on the UT campus. Check-in is at 9 a.m. at the outdoor amphitheater between Hodges Library and the Humanities Building, and the hunt begins promptly at 10 a.m. This event is open to the public.

For several decades, the Graduate Student Senate has sponsored the Love Your Libraries 5K to benefit the libraries. Profits from the race are donated to the library to help provide De-Stress For Success activities during Finals Week. This year, the format of the race has changed to a scavenger hunt.

Teams of 4 to 6 members will race around campus, searching for clues and completing tasks in order to figure out the location of the finish line. Whichever team completes the scavenger hunt first, wins. At the start of the race, participants will receive race packets, which will include a map, the rules of the race, and a list of items around campus that can be photographed and posted to social media for the #hashtag wars.

Prizes and trophies will be awarded to the first, second, and third place finishers and to the team that posts the most #hashtag items. Costumes are encouraged, and there will be prizes awarded to the Best Theme Costume and Best UT Themed Costume.

Registration is $10 until April 1 and $15 thereafter. T-shirts are guaranteed to participants who register by March 24. Register and read more at the Graduate Student Senate website.

Information Is Our Game: Meet Michelle Brannen

BrannenCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As Media Literacy Librarian, Michelle Brannen manages our media production lab (the Studio) and helps faculty integrate media into university coursework.

A growing number of disciplines now incorporate media projects in coursework. Michelle is committed to providing media instruction to meet the curricular needs of the campus and the career goals of students. She develops media training workshops and makes sure that the Studio offers state-of-the-art equipment and software for photography, video editing, sound recording, graphic design, and web design.

Michelle is also the Learning, Research, and Collections Librarian for the School of Journalism and Electronic Media, providing research consultations, information literacy instruction, and collection development for that discipline.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in music education from Florida State University and a master’s degree in information science from UT.

Contact Michelle (brannen@utk.edu, 974-6396) if you foresee the need for additional equipment, software, or services in the Studio. Michelle is knowledgeable about fair use issues and can answer questions about best media practices and standards.

Student Art Winners Announced

Winners of the Student Art in the Library juried exhibition have been announced. The UT Libraries has been holding Student Art in the Library contests since 2005. The contest is open to UT students in all disciplines, and is judged by a committee of library staff. First-, second-, and third-place winners are awarded cash prizes. This semester the committee received 166 entries from 45 artists. A number of the contributing artists were present for the unveiling on March 7.

The winners are:

hustleFirst Place:
Vera Aldridge
“All the Hustle and Bustle”
Linoleum print


boxquiatSecond Place:
Sterling Goller-Brown
“Boxquiat”
An homage to the artist Jean-Michel Basquiat
Oil, enamel, and oil bars


cowanThird Place:
Mallory Wade Cowan
“Thylakoid,” “Haversian System,” “Moniliform”
A series of abstract works based on biological systems
Oil, acrylic, and spray paint




Exhibiting artists this semester are: 
Vera Aldridge, Paige Burchell, Amanda Carrell, Conor Cook, Mallory Wade Cowan, Melisa Donahue, Sterling Goller-Brown, Lily Heine, Alyssa Johnson, Justin Kaewnopparat, Alena Mehic, Shana Milchuck, Mohammad Moniruzzaman, Richard Murray, Tatiana Potts, Allison Pruter, Ryan Stennes, Mary Julia Tunnell, and Hua Wei.

Artworks will remain on display in 135 Hodges Library throughout the spring semester. View a retrospective of previous Student Art in the Library exhibitions at trace.tennessee.edu/utk_libsart. Read more about the Libraries’ art competition and at lib.utk.edu/artinlibrary.

Information Is Our Game: Meet Judy Li

LiCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As the business librarian, Judy Li serves the information needs of students and faculty in Advertising; Retail, Hospitality and Tourism Management; and all programs in the College of Business Administration (CBA). As our business liaison, she provides research consultations, information literacy instruction, and collection development in those disciplines. Judy also works with MBA candidates pursuing their degrees remotely through the CBA’s Graduate and Executive Education program designed for working professionals.

Business information is packaged in a variety of ways. Judy’s “Business Research Center” — libguides.utk.edu/BIZ — is a good starting point for the researcher seeking company and industry information, economic and financial data, and other business tools. (Luckily, library subscriptions bring many valuable business sources out from behind the pay wall.)

Contact Judy (pli9@utk.edu, 974-0013) with your business reference questions or to schedule a research consultation. And watch for her upcoming financial literacy workshop.

Judy serves on the Executive/Advisory Board of the Special Library Association’s Business and Finance Division, and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Library and Information Science in Distance Learning.

In addition to her master’s in library and information science, Judy holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration and an MBA with a concentration in entrepreneurship. She is also pursuing a PhD in information science. Judy was a research consultant in the telecommunications industry prior to receiving her MLIS. She has been a business librarian for over a decade and has worked in public, academic, and special libraries in the US, Canada, and Hong Kong.

Information Is Our Game: Meet Thura Mack

MackCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As Coordinator of Community Learning Services and Diversity Programs, Thura Mack leads the Libraries’ outreach to schools in Knoxville and the surrounding community. Community Learning Services teaches information literacy and library research skills to university-bound students in programs such as UT’s Bridge Program and Project GRAD (Graduation Really Achieves Dreams). The Bridge Program helps first-year community college students make the transition to a four-year university. Participants live on the UT campus while taking freshman classes at Pellissippi State Community College then transfer to UT as sophomores. Project GRAD brings local inner-city high school students to campus for a week-long immersion in college life and coursework. Community Learning Services hosts an annual symposium for high schools students interested in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career fields.

Thura also chairs the Libraries’ Diversity Committee, which encourages respect and appreciation for individual differences through programs and resources that enhance knowledge and understanding of diversity. The Committee strives to provide leadership for the Libraries in meeting the needs of all its constituencies and special populations.

Thura holds a bachelor’s degree from Knoxville College and a master’s in library science from UT.

Foreign film screenings

Modern Foreign Languages & Literatures sponsors screenings of foreign-language films in the Hodges Library auditorium. Here’s the line-up for Spring 2014. All films are free and open to the public.

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FRENCH FILM SERIES
6 pm, Hodges Library Auditorium
French with English subtitles

Tuesday, Feb. 18
La belle et la bête (Beauty and the Beast)

Tuesday, March 25
Le chat du rabbin (The Rabbi’s Cat)

Tuesday, April 15
Peau d’âne (Donkey Skin)

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GERMAN FILM SERIES
6 pm, Hodges Library Auditorium
German with English subtitles

Thursday, Feb. 13
Hannah Arendt

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SPANISH FILM SERIES
5 pm, Hodges Library Auditorium
Spanish with English subtitles

Wednesday, Feb. 5
También la lluvia (Even the Rain)

Wednesday, March 12
El viaje de Carol (Carol’s Journey)

Wednesday, April 9
¿Cual es el camino a casa? (Which Way Home)

UT Hosts Second Annual STEM Symposium for High School Students March 29

KNOXVILLE — Tennessee high school students interested in careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics are invited to a symposium sponsored by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries on Saturday, March 29.

The second annual Big Orange STEM Symposium (BOSS): High School Outreach will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the John C. Hodges Library.

The symposium is free, but participants are encouraged to register at https://tiny.utk.edu/boss.

The registration deadline is Thursday, March 27. Free lunch and goody bags will be provided for participants who register before March 21.

The symposium brings together STEM-related departments and centers from across the UT campus and area organizations to provide high school students with a learning experience that includes guidance in career exploration and planning from a UT Career Services counselor. The symposium will give students a taste of each of the disciplines so they will be better prepared to decide which area they would like to study.

Two panel discussions — one featuring current undergraduate students and another with STEM professors — will offer insights into the university experience and how to succeed in STEM studies. Students also will be able to meet researchers working in STEM fields. In breakout sessions, they will learn about strategies and techniques for doing undergraduate research through exposure to the scientific process, resources and technologies. There will also be a STEM fair where participants can learn about STEM organizations in the region and opportunities at UT.

The symposium will feature representatives from the Knoxville community including Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Texas Instruments, Biology in a Box and Dade Moeller. The UT departments of Mathematics, Soil Science, Geography and Chemistry also will participate.

For more information about the symposium, visit https://tiny.utk.edu/boss.

CONTACT:

Ingrid Ruffin (865-974-3513, iruffin@utk.edu)

Terra Incognita, a bibliography of the Smokies, published by UT Press

Terra Smokies CoverJoin us for a brown bag lecture, “‘Terra Incognita:’ The Great Smoky Mountains in Print,” at the East Tennessee History Center, March 12, 2014, from noon to 1:00 p.m., to hear highlights from the recently published bibliography.
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Terra Incognita is the most comprehensive bibliography of sources related to the Great Smoky Mountains ever created. Compiled and edited by three librarians, this authoritative and meticulously researched work is an indispensable reference for scholars and students studying any aspect of the region’s past.

Starting with the de Soto map of 1544, the earliest document that purports to describe anything about the Great Smoky Mountains, and continuing through 1934 with the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park—today the most visited national park in the United States—this volume catalogs books, periodical and journal articles, selected newspaper reports, government publications, dissertations, and theses published during that period.
This bibliography treats the Great Smoky Mountain Region in western North Carolina and east Tennessee systematically and extensively in its full historic and social context. Prefatory material includes a timeline of the Great Smoky Mountains and a list of suggested readings on the era covered. The book is divided into thirteen thematic chapters, each featuring an introductory essay that discusses the nature and value of the materials in that section. Following each overview is an annotated bibliography that includes full citation information and a bibliographic description of each entry.

Chapters cover the history of the area; the Cherokee in the Great Smoky Mountains; the national forest movement and the formation of the national park; life in the locality; Horace Kephart, perhaps the most important chronicler to document the mountains and their inhabitants; natural resources; early travel; music; literature; early exploration and science; maps; and recreation and tourism. Sure to become a standard resource on this rich and vital region, Terra Incognita is an essential acquisition for all academic and public libraries and a boundless resource for researchers and students of the region.

Anne Bridges and Ken Wise are co-directors of the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project. Bridges is associate professor at John C. Hodges Library at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her research has been published in the Journal of Academic Librarianship, Book Research Quarterly, and Maine Historical Quarterly. Wise, associate professor at the John C. Hodges Library, is the author of Hiking Trails of the Great Smoky Mountains and co-author of A Natural History of Mount Le Conte. Having worked in academic libraries from 1977 to 2013, Russell Clement is now retired from Northwestern University, where his most recent position was head of the art collection. Clement has published extensively in art history and bibliography.

Information Is Our Game: Meet Chris Eaker

EakerCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As Data Curation Librarian, Chris Eaker supports UT researchers in the search for external funding. Chris helps faculty formulate the data management plans required by many grant-funding agencies. He can help researchers plan for data preservation, access, and sharing. He is knowledgeable about existing data repositories serving the various academic disciplines and can help faculty discover relevant existing data sets as well as making UT researchers’ own data more widely available for use by other researchers.

He is available to serve as a member of grant teams and invites researchers to contact him early in the proposal preparation process. He welcomes opportunities to help faculty include data stewardship in their teaching.

Chris is vice-chair of the DataONE Users Group. DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth) is a National Science Foundation-funded project to archive environmental data produced by scientists around the world.

Chris is also the Learning, Research, and Collections Librarian for Architecture and Design, providing research consultations, information literacy instruction, and collection development in those disciplines.

Chris holds a bachelor’s degree in civil and environmental engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in information science from UT. Chris has almost ten years’ experience as a practicing civil engineer and specialized training in data curation.


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The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System