3D printing turns library users into industrial designers

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Last year, the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library added 3D printing to the technology they provide to library users. 3D printing lets designers rapidly turn their ideas into plastic prototypes. Engineering students from the College of Agriculture are using the AgVet library’s 3D printer to test their design ideas.

The library’s IT technologist, Richie Sexton, spearheaded the project to offer 3D printing. A story in today’s Knoxzine features Richie explaining the operation and benefits of 3D printing. Check it out.

[Here are guidelines for 3D printing at the Pendergrass Library.]




Follow Our Leisure Collection Online

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Pendergrass Library is launching a Goodreads account that will allow our patrons to browse titles in our new leisure reading collection remotely. Titles that are part of the collection are listed on the Our Books shelf; titles ordered but not yet received are listed on the Coming Soon shelf. Our Goodreads account is also synced to the library’s Twitter feed. Please follow us as it will help build the social media we hope will support this collection.

This is an evolving collection and will be built in partnership with our community. We are interested in what our patrons want to read and want to ensure that relevant topics and titles are not inadvertently omitted from the collection. Visit the leisure collection page to submit a request. Feel free to ask us if you need any additional help or information!




ChemBioDraw freely available for UT students, faculty, and staff

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What is it?  ChemBioDraw is a drawing tool for chemists and biologists used to create publication-ready, scientifically intelligent drawings for use in ELNs, databases and publications, and for querying chemical databases.

Where can I run it?  ChemBioDraw is available at no extra charge to UTK and UTSI faculty, staff, and students for installation on university-owned and personally-owned Windows PCs and Macs.  The download and installation instructions are at http://oit.utk.edu/software.  It is also available on OIT’s apps@UT server and on the computers in the OIT public computer labs.

How can I learn it?  To watch webinar videos, read informative articles, and watch feature demos, go to the main web page at http://www.cambridgesoft.com and select Chemistry and then ChemBioDraw.

Where can I get support?  RCS offers minimal support for ChemBioDraw.  For technical support, browse the Cambridgesoft Technical Support site at http://www.cambridgesoft.com/support.  You may also download manuals for free, search, or ask a question in the support forum at http://forums.cambridgesoft.com or contact the support team via the web form at http://www.cambridgesoft.com/contact/support/form.




Leisure Reading Collection at Pendergrass

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Pendergrass Library is pleased to announce a new leisure reading collection.  It is located on the green wall near Study Room E and the quiet zone entrance.  The collection will consist of recently published fiction and nonfiction.  All books may be borrowed for four weeks by any UT student, staff, or faculty member.  We will add a substantial number of books to the collection this summer, and will continue to add more after that.  So, if you would like us to purchase a book that we don’t already own, please complete a book suggestion form.  These can be found on the Leisure Reading shelf or at Pendergrass Leisure Reading Collection.  Please stop by and check out our new collection!




Research hint: Virtual browsing

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There’s nothing like the serendipity of browsing the stacks and discovering that one book that is the perfect reference on your topic.

Well, actually, there is. Now there’s virtual browsing in the Libraries’ online catalog.

If the search box on the Libraries’ homepage leads you to a promising title, you can browse adjacent titles in the call number sequence.

After initiating a search, you should see the Virtual Browse tab listed on the brief record for any title having a call number.

Click Virtual Browse to view a virtual shelf of book covers. The virtual bookshelf allows you to browse up to 100 items to the left and right of the entry. The bookshelf displays items in the call number sequence regardless of library location. That’s even better than browsing the stacks!

VirtualBrowse

You can also browse through an alphabetic list of all titles, authors, or Library of Congress subject headings from the Libraries’ catalog. Select the Browse Search option at the top of the results page.

BrowseSearch
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These new features are part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.




Research hint: Grab the formatted citation

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Citing references in your research paper? The easiest way to format a citation in the prescribed style may be to grab the citation from the Libraries’ catalog. If UT owns the item and there’s a record in the catalog, you can access a formatted citation from the brief record display (results from using the search box on the Libraries’ homepage).

Click the Details tab under the item’s brief record. Choose “Citation” from the Actions dropdown menu in the upper right of the Details box. Formatting options include the American Psychological Association, Modern Language Association, and Chicago/Turabian styles.

ActionsDropdown

styles

To format journal article citations, use a citation management tool like Zotero or EndNote.
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This new feature is part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.




Did you know about…. Browzine? — Browse Journals on Mobile Devices

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The UT Libraries has an app for you:  BrowZine lets you browse and read journals in a format that is optimized for tablet devices.

The BrowZine app is available for the iPad and Android devices.

To get started, just search for “BrowZine” in the app store on your device. Simply register your NetID and password, and you’ll have access to all the UT Libraries’ electronic journals (issues back to 2005) and lots of useful features.

BrowZine users can create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals, be alerted when new editions of journals are published, and easily save to Zotero, Dropbox, and other services.

Remember to update your password with BrowZine whenever you change your NetID password.

If you have further questions, contact Gayle Baker at the UT Libraries (865-974-3519, gsbaker@utk.edu)).




Pendergrass Library: Now Hiring

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The Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library is seeking a student library assistants (SLAs) for the 2014-2015 academic year. We are looking for students dedicated to providing good public service, a strong work ethic, and working in a collaborative environment with patrons and library staff. Please visit lib.utk.edu/employment for more detailed position descriptions and application instructions.




New Equipment at Pendergrass!

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Pendergrass Library has just added some additional equipment to our collection.  We now have 2 TI-84 Plus graphing calculators, which check out for 2 hours.  We have also added 5 more sets of headphones, and these check out for 24 hours.  All equipment accrues a $0.25/hour fine if returned late.  If you need either of these items, please stop by the desk with your Vol card and ask to borrow one.




Comprehensive Bibliography of the Smokies Now Available

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TerraThe culmination of fifteen years of research, Terra Incognita: An Annotated Bibliography of the Great Smoky Mountains, 1544-1934 is the most comprehensive bibliography of sources related to the Great Smoky Mountains ever created. The book is now available for purchase from the University of Tennessee Press.

Terra Incognita catalogs printed material on the Great Smoky Mountains from the earliest map documenting the De Soto expedition in the 16th century to writings that were instrumental in the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each chapter, introduced by a substantive essay, details published works on a different aspect of the history, peoples, culture, and natural history of the Smokies region. There are chapters, for instance, on the Cherokee, early explorers, music, mountain life, and the national park movement.

The authoritative and meticulously researched work is an indispensable reference for scholars and students studying any aspect of the region’s past. According to author and historian Jim Casada, “Terra Incognita belongs in every academic library in the country and locals who simply cherish the Smokies will want to have it on their shelves.”

The title for the bibliography comes from a remark by Horace Kephart, an early twentieth-century chronicler of mountain culture and an important force behind the founding of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Researching the region prior to his first visit in 1904, Kephart found the Great Smoky Mountains to be a “terra incognita.” Little to nothing, it seemed, could be found in libraries to elucidate the land or its people. This new bibliography rectifies that omission by bringing together the scattered and obscure early accounts of the Smokies. (Kephart is the only individual to merit a separate chapter in Terra Incognita.)

Terra Incognita was compiled and edited by three librarians. Anne Bridges and Ken Wise are associate professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries and co-directors of the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project (www.lib.utk.edu/smokies). Russell Clement, emeritus faculty at Northwestern University, worked for many years in academic libraries, most recently as head of the art collection at Northwestern.

An online database, Database of the Smokies (dots.lib.utk.edu), updates Terra Incognita with citations to material published since 1934, the date the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established.

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Contact:

Anne Bridges, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-0017, abridges@utk.edu)

Ken Wise, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-2359, kwise@utk.edu)

Ordering information: http://utpress.org