Impactstory Helps Researchers Make an Impact

Posted on


Impactstory

ImpactStory has created a list of 30 effective steps for researchers to ensure their hard work makes a difference in their field and with the public.  They are sharing one step a day on the Impactstory blog during the month of November and encourage followers of the blog to give each one a try. Impactstory is an open-source, web-based tool that helps researchers explore and share the diverse impact on all their research products.

You can view the blog using the link above or follow along via email.




Writers in the Library: David James Poissant, Nov. 17

Posted on


poissantDavid James Poissant will read from his highly acclaimed short story collection, The Heaven of Animals, at UT’s Writers in the Library on Monday, November 17, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public. Prior to the reading, at 3 p.m., he will be available for a Q&A session for UT students and faculty in the Practice Presentation Room, 220 E in Hodges Library Commons North.

The Heaven of Animals was named one of the most anticipated books of 2014 by The Millions. In a starred review, Kirkus describes Poissant’s stories as “Rueful and kind, akin to both Anton Chekhov and Raymond Carver in humane spirit and technical mastery.” Rebecca Lee of The New York Times Book Review touts the collection as “A wise debut . . . Beautiful, with a rogue touch,” and Karen Russell says of his writing, “Like Flannery O’Connor, Poissant’s stories are marked by violence, humor, and grace; like Saunders, he can spoon-bend reality; like Carver and Diaz, he writes scenes soaked in kerosene and seconds from combustion.”

David James Poissant’s stories and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Chicago Tribune, Glimmer Train, The New York Times, One Story, Playboy, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, and in the New Stories from the South and Best New American Voices anthologies. His writing has been awarded the Matt Clark Prize, the George Garrett Fiction Award, the RopeWalk Fiction Chapbook Prize, and the Alice White Reeves Memorial Award from the National Society of Arts & Letters, as well as awards from The Chicago Tribune and The Atlantic and Playboy magazines.

David James Poissant teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida and lives in Orlando with his wife and daughters.

Read an excellent review of The Heaven of Animals at Chapter 16: a community of Tennessee writers, readers and passersby (brought to you by Humanities Tennessee).
__
Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Free Tutoring in Pendergrass Library!

Posted on


The Office of Multicultural Student Life is joining the tutoring community available at Pendergrass Library.  This free service offers tutoring to those students enrolled in any section of the following courses:

  • Animal Sciences 220
  • Biology 150
  • Biology 160
  • Chemistry 120
  • Chemistry 130

The tutoring service is open to all students and no appointments are required.  Tutors will be available every Wednesday (5:00 – 8:00 p.m.) and Sunday (3:00 – 6:00 p.m.) during the fall semester.

For more information, please contact the Office of Multicultural Student Life.




Publish in PeerJ for Free Until Nov 30th (and beyond)

Posted on


PeerJ has announced that from now until November 30th 2014 they publish your article for free.

If you are a Faculty member, you can already receive a PeerJ membership using our prepaid PeerJ fund, but this opportunity allows everyone else to have the opportunity to use PeerJ’s innovative publishing platform. (Two of PeerJ’s most notable innovations are a preprint service and digital object identifiers (DOIs) for peer reviews.  Find out more by reading the PeerJ Blog.)

More information about PeerJ can also be found on the guide to PeerJ.
Want to publish in another Open Access Journal? Check out the Open Access Publishing Support Fund.
Want to help figure out where else you can publish? Check out these Indicators of Journal Quality and the Assessing the Impact of Research guides.
Want to make your already published research more accessible? Consider depositing a copy in TRACE.

For more information, visit this libguide.

 




OA Week: The Open Standard – News About Open Systems

Posted on


Has Open Access (OA) Week made you excited to learn more about the power of open principles? The Mozilla foundation (the non-profit responsible for the open-source Firefox browser) has launched a news site The Open Standard.

mozilla

The Open Standard provides online news coverage of open, transparent, and collaborative systems at work in technology and our daily lives. Our purpose is to showcase the positive global impact of these systems  and inspire more people to seek out, support and adopt open principles of accessibility, participation and experimentation.

 

The Open Standard is published by Mozilla, a global community of technologists, thinkers and builders working together to promote openness, innovation and opportunity online.  We will disclose and be transparent if we take a position on or promote the products and services of Mozilla or a partner company.

 

 

 

For more information visit the site here.
To learn more about Open Access visit this guide, or this page.




Celebrate Open Access Week, Oct. 20-26

Posted on


OAlogo

Open-access literature is digital, online, and free of charge.

University students and faculty can have a role in making research and scholarship freely accessible to all.

Choosing to publish in open-access journals can help. Tax dollars and college tuition pay for much of the research reported in academic journals. But the soaring costs of commercially published academic journals can bar faculty and student access to research and scholarship.

Learn about open-access journals, open textbooks, open data, and open-access digital repositories.

Join Open Access Week events in Hodges Library:

Kickoff Watch Party: “Generation Open”
Mon., Oct. 20, 3:00-4:00 pm, 220E Practice Presentation Rm.

    A live, streamed event will discuss the importance of students and early career researchers in the transition to open access, and will explore how changes in scholarly publishing affect scholars and researchers at different stages of their careers. Sponsored by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and the World Bank.

Talk: Tim Errington, project manager for the Center for Open Science
Thurs., Oct. 23, 1:30-3:00 pm, 213 Hodges Library

Tim Errington will discuss challenges to increasing open science practices and tell us how the SHARE notification system aims to make research assets more discoverable and more accessible.

Trace 5th Anniversary Celebration
Thurs., Oct. 23, 3:00-4:00 pm, Mary Greer Rm. (258)

Celebrate five years of Trace, the Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange. The Trace digital repository boasts 25,000+ items in 900+ disciplines and more than 3.3 million downloads. Join us for CAKE!




National Book Award nominee Elizabeth McCracken to read October 22

Posted on


McCrackenElizabeth McCracken will read from her latest short story collection, Thunderstruck & Other Stories, at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Wednesday, October 22, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

McCracken is the author of five books, most recently Thunderstruck, currently on the long list for the 2014 National Book Award in fiction. Her other books include National Book Award finalist The Giant’s House and New York Times Book Review Notable Books An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination and Niagara Falls All Over Again. McCracken is currently James A. Michener Chair of Creative Writing at the University of Texas at Austin.

Thunderstruck is a collection of nine stories featuring a variety of eclectic characters, including a girl ghost, the human musical saw, and two three-legged dogs, among others. Publishers Weekly heralded the work as “mesmerizing and strange,” and commented that McCracken “transforms life’s dead ends into transformational visions.”

In addition to the reading, the author will participate in a Q&A discussion about her work at 3 p.m. in 1210 McClung Tower on October 22. The discussion is open to all UT students and faculty.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

Christopher Hebert, the UT Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, emcees Writers in the Library events. Hebert and Marilyn Kallet, director of the UT Creative Writing Program, have lined up an exceptional group of authors to read in the 2014–2015 academic year. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule.
__
For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Big Orange Give to the UT Libraries

Posted on


Join the effort to raise $5,000 for the UT Libraries.

If we raise $5,000, Dr. Bass will make an additional $10,000 gift.  

YouTube Preview Image

We hope you share the UT Libraries’ vision: “We are the campus main street and the crossroads for innovation, scholarship, learning, and civility.” Students rely on our libraries for round-the-clock research assistance, study space, and access to exceptional scholarly collections. Join Dr. Bill Bass and make a gift to help the UT Libraries continue to be a leader in delivering outstanding services to students and faculty.

Step up your give. Contribute to the UT Libraries >>