What you need to know: Pendergrass Library relocation

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Pendergrass Library is closing May 8 due to construction. Pendergrass services will be available in Brehm Animal Science Room 243 (Computer Lab), as well as virtually through chat and email from May 11 to the end of construction.  View our maps of how to get to Brehm and where to find the computer lab.

What you need to do by Friday, May 8: Check out any paper books or journals from the Pendergrass stacks you will need this summer. Due date will be at the end of summer.

What to do if you need access to the Pendergrass collection AFTER May 8: Use Interlibrary Services to request books and journals or anything else not available electronically.

Electronic books and journals will still be available through the library website.

Where will help be located for veterinary medicine and statistics? Veterinary medicine librarian Ann Viera and statisticians Ann Reed / Xiaocun Sun will be working from office A301 B5 on the third floor of the vet building.

Where is A301 B5? From the vet school’s main entrance adjacent to the Pendergrass Library entrance, take the stairs in the center of the room up to the 3rd floor.  Take an immediate left and enter the suite of offices to find A301 B5.  View our map to help locate the office.

Where will large format and 3D printing and other library services and staff be located? Starting May 11, 2nd floor of Brehm Animal Science, across the hall from the Computer Lab (Room 243).

When will the library re-open? The relocation is expected to last throughout the summer term.

Will I be able to get into the library? No. During construction, Pendergrass stacks / paper collections will be wrapped and inaccessible. Only the construction crew will be allowed in the library.  Library services, computers, and study space will be available in 243 Brehm.

What is happening and why: As part of the renovation of the Veterinary Medical Center Building, Pendergrass Library services will temporarily relocate to Brehm to allow replacement of the HVAC system.

Pendergrass will reopen at the start of the Fall semester or whenever the construction is completed. More information can be found here: libguides.utk.edu/pendergrassconstruction

We remain dedicated to providing library services to students, staff and faculty. Please do not hesitate to contact us with questions or concerns:

agvetlib@nullutk.edu
865-974-7338

Peter Fernandez
Subject librarian for Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources
pfernand@nullutk.edu
865-974-2886

Ann Viera
Subject librarian for Veterinary Medicine
annviera@nullutk.edu
865-974-9015




Test-drive the Libraries’ New Homepage

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homepageThe UT Libraries will soon launch a new homepage. The new page will go live immediately following spring semester. In the meantime, users can test-drive our leaner, cleaner homepage at lib.utk.edu/testing.

Our new homepage has fewer distracting graphics. A slimmer OneSearch box and the smaller footprint of the page reduce the need for vertical scrolling. These enhancements were made in response to suggestions from our users.

The cleaner design should help users locate information quickly. Popular destinations such as “My Account” and “Reserve a Room” are featured on conspicuous links at the center of the page. Links to research help appear in the right-hand column, including the chat box and customized help for different library constituencies.

And library news and events get more prominent billing.

Library Marketing and Communications would like your opinion on the redesigned homepage. Please send comments and suggestions to rbedenbaugh@nullutk.edu.




De-Stress for Success during finals

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Are you stressing about finals week? Need some time to relax and unwind?

Come to the library to “De-Stress for Success,” starting Study Day, Monday, April 27, and continuing through the last day of finals, Tuesday, May 5.

Hodges Library, the George F. DeVine Music Library, and Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library will host games, free massages, and free snacks (while they last). HABIT therapy dogs will visit Hodges and Pendergrass.

therewillbepuppies

There will be puppies!

DE-STRESS
Mon., April 27 noon – 2 pm Free ice cream Hodges
2 pm – 8 pm HABIT dogs Hodges
5 pm Free coffee & herbal tea Pendergrass
Tues., April 28 8:30 am Free coffee Music
10 am – 1 pm Free chair massages Music
noon Sandwiches & salad Pendergrass
1 pm – 4 pm Free chair massages Hodges
2 pm – 5 pm Free chair massages Pendergrass
2 pm – 8 pm HABIT dogs Hodges
Wed., April 29 8:30 am Free coffee Pendergrass
8:30 am Free coffee Music
10 am – 1 pm Free chair massages Music
noon LOLcats slideshow Pendergrass
1 pm – 4 pm Free chair massages Hodges
2 pm – 5 pm Free chair massages Pendergrass
2 pm – 8 pm HABIT dogs Hodges
Thurs., April 30 10 am – 1 pm Free chair massages Music
1 pm – 4 pm Free chair massages Hodges
2 pm – 5 pm Free chair massages Pendergrass
2 pm – 8 pm HABIT dogs Hodges
5 pm Free coffee & herbal tea Pendergrass
Fri., May 1 9 am Trivia slideshow Pendergrass
noon – 3 pm HABIT dogs Hodges
Mon., May 4 8:30 am Free coffee Pendergrass
10 am – 1 pm Free chair massages Music
noon Tropical paradise slideshow Pendergrass
1 pm – 4 pm Free chair massages Hodges
2 pm – 5 pm Free chair massages Pendergrass
2 pm – 8 pm HABIT dogs Hodges
Tues., May 5 10 am – 1 pm Free chair massages Music
1 pm – 4 pm Free chair massages Hodges
2 pm – 5 pm Free chair massages Pendergrass



Let’s talk about diversity: take our 5-minute poll

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Can we have a comfortable dialog about diversity, inclusion vs. intolerance, and the small ethical decisions we make daily? The UT Libraries’ Diversity Committee asks you to take a five-minute poll to help select topics for a lunchtime discussion series to be launched next fall.

Take our brief poll now.

Help us determine the topics of greatest interest to the UT community. Our online poll has only three questions and will take no more than five minutes of your time. No identifying information will be collected, and the results will be used solely for purposes of planning the discussion series.

The lunchtime discussion series, sponsored by the UT Libraries’ Diversity Committee in conjunction with the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, will be held in the Hodges Library. Discussions will be open to all.

If you have questions about the discussion series or about the poll, please contact Megan Venable at mvenable@nullutk.edu.




Student Winners of Graduate Writing Awards to Read, April 13

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The University of Tennessee’s final Writers in the Library event of the academic year will feature readings by student winners of the John C. Hodges Graduate Writing Awards. Readings from the winning works will take place in the Hodges Library auditorium on Monday, April 13, at 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Awards are made possible by the English Department through the John C. Hodges Better English Fund, endowed by the long-time UT English professor and author of the Harbrace College Handbook, for whom the Hodges Library is named.

2015 winners of the John C. Hodges Graduate Writing Awards:

FICTION



First Prize: Daniel Wallace for “The Hills Will Melt Like Wax”
Second Prize: Richard Hermes for “Until the New Season is Born”
Third Prize: Helen Stead for “Muleta”

POETRY



First Prize: Helen Stead for “Bangers and Mash”
Second Prize: Ben McClendon for “Hoping to Find Something Between”
Third Prize: Kierstyn Lamour for “What is There to Learn About a Man Leaving His Wife?”

This year’s judges were B.J. Leggett for fiction and Flossie McNabb for poetry.

The public is invited to join the university community for readings by these accomplished, up-and-coming writers.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




John Yau’s reading and lecture CANCELLED

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***John Yau’s reading and lecture have been CANCELLED due to illness. Both events will be rescheduled for the 2015-2016 academic year.***

yauPoet and art critic John Yau will visit the University of Tennessee, Knoxville to both read his poetry and deliver a lecture on art.

Yau will be the featured reader at “Writers in the Library” on Wednesday, April 8, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library.

He will also deliver a public lecture as part of the School of Art’s VADSCO Lecture series on Thursday, April 9, 7:30 p.m. in the McCarty Auditorium, 109 Art & Architecture Building. Both events are free and open to the public.

Yau is a poet, fiction writer, critic, publisher, and freelance curator. Yau’s poetry collections include Corpse and Mirror (1983) (selected by John Ashbery for the National Poetry Series), Edificio Sayonara (1992), Forbidden Entries (1996), Borrowed Love Poems (2002), Ing Grish (2005), Paradiso Diaspora (2006), Exhibits (2010), and Further Adventures in Monochrome (2012).

Yau has received numerous awards, including the Lavan Award from the Academy of American Poets, the American Poetry Review Jerome Shestack Award, an NEA fellowship, two Ingram-Merrill Foundation Fellowships, and grants from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.

Yau’s most recent book-length work of art criticism is the essay collection A Thing Among Things: The Art of Jasper Johns. His reviews have appeared in Artforum, Art in America, Art News, Bookforum, and the Los Angeles Times. In 2012 he started the online magazine Hyperallergic Weekend with three other writers.

He has collaborated with many artists, including Norman Bluhm, Ed Paschke, Peter Saul, Pat Steir, Jürgen Partenheimer, and Norbert Prangenberg on exhibitions appearing in the Museum of Modern Art, New York City: the Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany; and the Queensland Art Gallery, South Brisbane, Australia.

Yau is currently associate professor in critical studies at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Reserve Library Study Rooms — Remotely

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For some time, students have been able to walk up to a group study room in Hodges Library and use the Room Wizard to immediately access the study space. Now students can reserve a group study in advance from wherever they happen to be, through the Libraries’ new online reservation system.

Group study rooms on the 1st and 2nd floors of Hodges Library and the group study in the Music Library are available for booking. Access the reservation system at s.lib.utk.edu/studyrooms. A valid UT email address is required to confirm the booking.

Remote reservations must be made at least two hours in advance and can be made up to a month in advance. Reservations may be made for a maximum of two hours per day.

Students may still walk up to an empty study room displaying a green light and press the “Use Now” button for immediate access.

Self-reservations for study spaces in the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library are not available at this time. However, students may submit online requests at lib.utk.edu/access/rooms. Pendergrass study room requests currently must be made 48 hours in advance.




Novelist Shannon Burke at Writers in the Library April 6

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Burke_smallNovelist Shannon Burke will read at “Writers in the Library” Monday, April 6, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Burke’s latest novel, Into the Savage Country (2015), is a historical adventure set in the American West of the 1820s — at once a tale of complex friendships, a love story, and a panoramic retelling of a crucial moment in American history. In a starred review, Publisher’s Weekly calls the book “a masterpiece of historical accuracy and exciting storytelling” and raves that it’s “a raucous tale of a young man’s dream colliding with reality.”

Before moving to Knoxville, where he currently works as a screenwriter, Shannon Burke was a New York-based paramedic, a milieu that informed the author’s two previous novels, Safelight (2005), a love story between a disaffected paramedic and a professional fencer with HIV; and Black Flies (2008), a New York Times Notable Book, which the author is working to adapt for television.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Student Art in the Library: vote for your favorite

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Cast a vote for your favorite work of art.

Artworks selected for the Student Art in the Library juried exhibition are ready for your critique. We want you to determine the winner of the “People’s Choice Award” by liking your favorite. Voting begins Friday, March 27, at facebook.com/utklibraries.

The Student Art in the Library competition, which was open to all currently enrolled UT students, drew entries from 46 artists. Almost 100 individual pieces were submitted. The selected artworks will remain on display at the gallery in the Miles Reading Room, 1st floor, Hodges Library, until April 24.

First-, second-, and third-place winners, as well as the People’s Choice, will be announced at a reception on Thursday, April 2, 4 p.m. in the Miles Reading Room. Cash awards will be presented.

Cast your vote! And join us at the reception April 2.




Harvard Librarian Robert Darnton to speak on the future of the book

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Robert DarntonRobert Darnton, the Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and librarian at Harvard University, will wrap up the Humanities Center Distinguished Lecture Series at on Wednesday, April 1, speaking about the future of books and libraries in today’s digital world.

Known as a pioneer in the history of the book, Darnton will present a talk titled “Books, Libraries and the Digital Future.” The event will begin at 3:30 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of John C. Hodges Library. It is free and open to the public.

Darnton contends that—contrary to assumptions that they will become obsolete—books and libraries will become increasingly important in the digital future. One way to increase their importance, he says, is to democratize access to knowledge.

The Digital Public Library of America, which went online in April 2013, exemplifies the possibilities of democratization. It aims to make America’s cultural heritage available free of charge to everyone in the world.

Darnton graduated from Phillips Academy and Harvard University and received his doctorate from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

He worked briefly as a reporter at the New York Times and then joined the faculty at Princeton University. In 2007 he attained emeritus status at Princeton and took his current positions at Harvard.

He serves as a trustee of the New York Public Library and the Oxford University Press. He also has served as president of the American Historical Association.

Darnton was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 1982. He received the National Humanities Medal conferred by President Obama in 2012 and the Del Duca World Prize in the Humanities from the Institut de France in 2013.

Darnton’s talk is sponsored by the UT Humanities Center with support from the Haines-Morris Endowment, Ready for the World, the John C. Hodges Humanities Endowment, and the Office of Research and Engagement.