Writers in the Library: David James Poissant, Nov. 17

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poissantDavid James Poissant will read from his highly acclaimed short story collection, The Heaven of Animals, at UT’s Writers in the Library on Monday, November 17, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public. Prior to the reading, at 3 p.m., he will be available for a Q&A session for UT students and faculty in the Practice Presentation Room, 220 E in Hodges Library Commons North.

The Heaven of Animals was named one of the most anticipated books of 2014 by The Millions. In a starred review, Kirkus describes Poissant’s stories as “Rueful and kind, akin to both Anton Chekhov and Raymond Carver in humane spirit and technical mastery.” Rebecca Lee of The New York Times Book Review touts the collection as “A wise debut . . . Beautiful, with a rogue touch,” and Karen Russell says of his writing, “Like Flannery O’Connor, Poissant’s stories are marked by violence, humor, and grace; like Saunders, he can spoon-bend reality; like Carver and Diaz, he writes scenes soaked in kerosene and seconds from combustion.”

David James Poissant’s stories and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Chicago Tribune, Glimmer Train, The New York Times, One Story, Playboy, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, and in the New Stories from the South and Best New American Voices anthologies. His writing has been awarded the Matt Clark Prize, the George Garrett Fiction Award, the RopeWalk Fiction Chapbook Prize, and the Alice White Reeves Memorial Award from the National Society of Arts & Letters, as well as awards from The Chicago Tribune and The Atlantic and Playboy magazines.

David James Poissant teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida and lives in Orlando with his wife and daughters.

Read an excellent review of The Heaven of Animals at Chapter 16: a community of Tennessee writers, readers and passersby (brought to you by Humanities Tennessee).
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

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Brown Bag, Oct. 29: Digitizing Tennessee’s historic newspapers

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Historical newspaper records once available only through long hours of research can now be accessed within seconds. Learn about a program that is digitizing Tennessee’s historic newspapers and making them available online.

The public is invited to a Brown Bag Lunch on Wednesday, October 29, at noon in the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street. The speaker will be Louisa Trott, project coordinator for the Tennessee Newspaper Digitization Project, a joint project of the University of Tennessee Libraries and the Tennessee State Library and Archives. Trott will talk about the scope of the project, its value to researchers, how it can be accessed, and will give examples of the many types of information to be found in newspapers from the period.

For the past three years, the UT Libraries has been scanning historic Tennessee newspapers as part of a nationwide project, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, that aims to preserve this “first draft of history.” The first phase of the project concentrated on the Civil War and Reconstruction era, the second on the period of 1870-1900. The digitized newspapers are available to the public at the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America website and are fully searchable.

The program is sponsored by 21st Mortgage. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information call the East Tennessee History Center at 865-215-8824.




Public Invited to Hear Anthropologist Bill Bass, Oct. 30

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BillBass2Over his fifty-year career as an anthropologist, University of Tennessee Professor Emeritus William M. Bass excavated ancient skeletons and recovered the remains of murder victims. He also headed UT’s anthropology department for more than 20 years and trained many of the nation’s current leading forensic anthropologists.

The University of Tennessee Libraries, which holds the research and teaching materials documenting his illustrious career, will honor Bass and celebrate the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection at an upcoming event. The public is invited to a lecture by Bass and a reception in his honor on Thursday, October 30, at UT’s John C. Hodges Library.

A reception in the Jack E. Reese Galleria begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by the lecture in the Lindsay Young Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Guests also may visit Special Collections to view items from the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.

PrintBass is perhaps best known to the general public as the creator of the “Body Farm” — officially the Anthropology Research Center. The Body Farm was the world’s first laboratory for researching the processes and timetable of decomposition of human remains.

Bass has recounted the story of the Body Farm to many audiences. His talk at the UT library will be something different. He will focus on his more traditional pursuits in the field of anthropology, including excavating human skeletal remains in the Great Plains in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution. His field study notebooks from these excavations are among the materials Bass donated to the UT Libraries to create the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.





Celebrate the Day of the Dead, Oct. 31

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Representations of Catrina, one of the most popular figures of the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico. (©Tomas Castelazo, www.tomascastelazo.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Stop by the Hodges Library (1st floor galleria) and vote for your favorite traditional ofrenda (altars honoring the deceased) created by students from the Second-Year Spanish Program. The Alter Exhibit and Competition will be on view from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

A festival of films, music videos, and documentaries related to the Day of the Dead will run throughout the day in the Hodges Library auditorium.

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday observed throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a bank holiday. The celebration takes place on October 31, November 1 and November 2, in connection with the triduum of Allhallowtide: All Hallows’ Eve, Hallowmas, and All Souls’ Day. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Day_of_the_Dead
,
accessed 14 October 2014]

 

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Visit the Second-Year Spanish Program’s webpage

 

 

 




Celebrate Open Access Week, Oct. 20-26

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OAlogo

Open-access literature is digital, online, and free of charge.

University students and faculty can have a role in making research and scholarship freely accessible to all.

Choosing to publish in open-access journals can help. Tax dollars and college tuition pay for much of the research reported in academic journals. But the soaring costs of commercially published academic journals can bar faculty and student access to research and scholarship.

Learn about open-access journals, open textbooks, open data, and open-access digital repositories.

Join Open Access Week events in Hodges Library:

Kickoff Watch Party: “Generation Open”
Mon., Oct. 20, 3:00-4:00 pm, 220E Practice Presentation Rm.

    A live, streamed event will discuss the importance of students and early career researchers in the transition to open access, and will explore how changes in scholarly publishing affect scholars and researchers at different stages of their careers. Sponsored by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and the World Bank.

Talk: Tim Errington, project manager for the Center for Open Science
Thurs., Oct. 23, 1:30-3:00 pm, 213 Hodges Library

Tim Errington will discuss challenges to increasing open science practices and tell us how the SHARE notification system aims to make research assets more discoverable and more accessible.

Trace 5th Anniversary Celebration
Thurs., Oct. 23, 3:00-4:00 pm, Mary Greer Rm. (258)

Celebrate five years of Trace, the Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange. The Trace digital repository boasts 25,000+ items in 900+ disciplines and more than 3.3 million downloads. Join us for CAKE!




National Book Award nominee Elizabeth McCracken to read October 22

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McCrackenElizabeth McCracken will read from her latest short story collection, Thunderstruck & Other Stories, at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Wednesday, October 22, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

McCracken is the author of five books, most recently Thunderstruck, currently on the long list for the 2014 National Book Award in fiction. Her other books include National Book Award finalist The Giant’s House and New York Times Book Review Notable Books An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination and Niagara Falls All Over Again. McCracken is currently James A. Michener Chair of Creative Writing at the University of Texas at Austin.

Thunderstruck is a collection of nine stories featuring a variety of eclectic characters, including a girl ghost, the human musical saw, and two three-legged dogs, among others. Publishers Weekly heralded the work as “mesmerizing and strange,” and commented that McCracken “transforms life’s dead ends into transformational visions.”

In addition to the reading, the author will participate in a Q&A discussion about her work at 3 p.m. in 1210 McClung Tower on October 22. The discussion is open to all UT students and faculty.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

Christopher Hebert, the UT Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, emcees Writers in the Library events. Hebert and Marilyn Kallet, director of the UT Creative Writing Program, have lined up an exceptional group of authors to read in the 2014–2015 academic year. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

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Big Orange Give to the UT Libraries

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Join the effort to raise $5,000 for the UT Libraries.

If we raise $5,000, Dr. Bass will make an additional $10,000 gift.  

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We hope you share the UT Libraries’ vision: “We are the campus main street and the crossroads for innovation, scholarship, learning, and civility.” Students rely on our libraries for round-the-clock research assistance, study space, and access to exceptional scholarly collections. Join Dr. Bill Bass and make a gift to help the UT Libraries continue to be a leader in delivering outstanding services to students and faculty.

Step up your give. Contribute to the UT Libraries >>




Ingrid Kopp, Tribeca Digital Initiatives, at Hodges Library Sept. 30

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KoppAn Evening with Ingrid Kopp, Tribeca Digital Initiatives
September 30th, 7:30pm
Hodges Library Auditorium

An innovator in interactive storytelling and maker culture, Ingrid Kopp is Director of Digital Initiatives at the Tribeca Film Institute, where she oversees the TFI New Media Fund. Recent supported projects include Alma, Hollow, Lyka’s Adventure and Question Bridge. Ingrid leads the Institute’s other digital and interactive programs including the TFI Interactive conference and the Tribeca Hacks hackathon series bringing storytellers, technologists and designers together to explore new projects and collaborations. She also curates the Tribeca Storyscapes program for interactive, transmedia work at the Tribeca Film Festival. Ingrid is constantly working at the intersection between storytelling, technology, design and social change and is a frequent speaker on the subject. You can always find her on Twitter: @fromthehip
 

 




Workshop: NVivo and EndNote

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NVivo and EndNote
October 20, 2014
3:30-5:00 pm
Room 211, Hodges Library

Register at workshop.utk.edu

This course will teach users how to combine NVivo 10 and EndNote to interface citations with research. Bibliographic data, including full-text articles, can be found and archived in EndNote and then transferred to NVivo for analysis. Most researchers use a bibliographic program to organize references and for the ‘Cite while you write’ function. Learning to use NVivo along with Endnote will allow you to add notes or annotations to your bibliographic database as you review your references. If you have added notes (or other material), NVivo can help you write a review of the literature in a particular area of research, or help you conduct an analysis of the literature (or other documentary sources) pertaining to a particular area of research.
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Taught by Rochelle Butler, Qualitative Research Consultant, OIT Research Computing Support, and Jeanine Williamson, engineering librarian.