Research Hint: Sign-in to “Get It” Delivered

Posted on


The Libraries’ website allows you to request items online, but you must be signed-in to do so. If you access the website from off-campus — whether you’re a UTK-affiliated user or non-UTK user — you will not be able to see the full range of One Search results unless you sign-in prior to conducting your search.
ResearchHints3
Download a PDF of this
research hint here.

 

We recommend that all users begin a search by signing in, using the Off-campus users: Sign in button on the library homepage.

GetIt-1

 

Enter your search in the One Search box.

maya_onesearch

 

Results that display within the Get It tab are items available for either delivery or pickup.

GetIt-2

 

Failed to sign in? Click Sign-in for more options.

MoreOptions

 

Then request delivery of the Physical Item or a PDF Scan.

Physical&PDF

 

To pick up the Physical Item at one of our libraries, select a Pickup Location. UT faculty, graduate students, and staff may request Personal Delivery to a Work Address (i.e., department’s main office).

SelectLocation

 

To have a PDF Scan delivered to your email, note the book chapters or article pages to be scanned. Be sure to specify “pages” or “chapters.”

Page_Chapter

 

(More hints: How to expand your search results.)







Research Hint: One Search vs. UT Collections

Posted on


One Search finds items from UT Collections as well as many other electronic resources, including journal and newspaper articles, book chapters, books, reviews, legal documents, and much more (including content from many, though not all, of the individual databases provided by the UT Libraries).
ResearchHints3
Download a PDF of this
research hint here.

 

piketty1

 

Want to limit your search to only those items physically available at UT’s libraries or immediately viewable as full text? Select the UT Collections tab.

piketty2

There it is! That’s what I wanted.

(Alternatively, you can expand your search results to discover even more resources.)




Cutover to new library system over Winter Holiday

Posted on


Over the Winter Holiday the UT Libraries will transition to a new cloud-hosted “backend” for its integrated library system. Beginning at 8 p.m. on December 11, there will be a brief disruption of Library Express delivery, pick-up, and scan-on-demand services.

This past semester we launched a major upgrade to the Libraries’ discovery portal. By the time students return for the spring semester, our massive database of library holdings will reside in the cloud. And behind-the-scenes processing, such as ordering, cataloging, and circulation of library materials, also will take place in the cloud.

For the most part, changes will be completely invisible to the library user. But users will notice some improvements to the library catalog, such as fewer clicks to request items. Buttons to “View It” (for electronic items) or “Get It” (for physical items) will display along with the initial results to a OneSearch query.

Library Express delivery, pick-up, and scan-on-demand will be back in business on Monday, December 29. If users have questions about Library Express or document delivery services, they may phone 865-974-0021 or email express@nullutk.edu).




Libraries’ One Search goes live: expect many, many more hits!

Posted on


OneSearchOn Monday, August 18, our new One Search goes live! We’re launching a major upgrade to the Libraries’ discovery portal: the search box in the middle of library homepages will yield exponentially more results than in the past.

Now includes articles. One Search results include journal articles. Previously, articles could be found only by searching within individual databases.

Searches far beyond UT. Each search will likely return thousands more items than in the past because our new product (Primo Central) searches far beyond UT’s holdings.

Electronic full text. Searches will return many, many more items for which the full text is immediately available electronically. Look for the green radio button and “Full text available” or “Electronic full text.” To see the full text, select “View Online” and don’t be intimidated when another pre-populated search box pops up. Just pick one and “GO”!

More search hints:

    Refine My Results. To “Refine My Results,” use the facets in the column to the left of the entries. Quickly narrow the results to “Articles” under “Resource Type.” Or expand a facet list (“Show more”) and select “Refine results” to limit hits to several, selected Resource Types, Collections, Topics, etc.
    Expand My Results. Want to see an even larger universe of resources? Check “Include resources without electronic full-text.”
    Want local holdings only? To limit search results to only those items owned by UT, click the “UT Collections” tab at the top of the results page. For a known-item search, select “Browse UT Collections” and enter a new title, author, subject, or call number search to browse through an alphabetic or numeric list of our holdings.
    One Search vs. databases. Accessing the full content and full functionality of some databases still requires searching from within the database interface (lib.utk.edu/databases). Unsure? Ask a librarian.

Yes, One Search is easier… it’s broader… it’s better. But it’s also far more complex. All the more reason to ask a librarian. Visit the Research Assistance Desk (in Hodges, that’s Room 209) or AskUsNow (lib.utk.edu/askusnow) via phone, chat, text, or email.




3D printing turns library users into industrial designers

Posted on


Last year, the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library added 3D printing to the technology they provide to library users. 3D printing lets designers rapidly turn their ideas into plastic prototypes. Engineering students from the College of Agriculture are using the AgVet library’s 3D printer to test their design ideas.

The library’s IT technologist, Richie Sexton, spearheaded the project to offer 3D printing. A story in today’s Knoxzine features Richie explaining the operation and benefits of 3D printing. Check it out.

[Here are guidelines for 3D printing at the Pendergrass Library.]




Map Collection Moves, Makes Room for More Study Space in Hodges Library

Posted on


The UT Libraries’ Map Collection is relocating, making room for more study space on the ground floor of Hodges Library. Map Services closes May 6 to begin preparing for the move.

Over the summer, the remainder of the map collection will be moved to new quarters in the James D. Hoskins Library (1401 Cumberland Avenue). The entire collection will once again be in one place, and the map collections will be staffed and remain accessible after the relocation takes place. The vacated space on the ground floor of Hodges Library will serve as study space and overflow seating for One Stop. The renovated space should open before fall semester.

Geospatial services (GIS assistance, geospatial data, etc.) will be relocated to Commons South alongside new scholarly digital services.

Library users will have access to the map collections by visiting the Storage Reading Room, 200 Hoskins Library.

If you’ve never visited the Hoskins Library, a pleasant surprise awaits you. The James D. Hoskins Library, designed by renowned architect Charles Barber and built between 1929 and 1931, is collegiate Gothic in style and features vaulted ceilings decorated with literary inscriptions. The main campus library moved from the Hoskins Library to the renovated Hodges Library in 1987.

Please bear with us as we relocate services.




Research hint: Virtual browsing

Posted on


There’s nothing like the serendipity of browsing the stacks and discovering that one book that is the perfect reference on your topic.

Well, actually, there is. Now there’s virtual browsing in the Libraries’ online catalog.

If the search box on the Libraries’ homepage leads you to a promising title, you can browse adjacent titles in the call number sequence.

After initiating a search, you should see the Virtual Browse tab listed on the brief record for any title having a call number.

Click Virtual Browse to view a virtual shelf of book covers. The virtual bookshelf allows you to browse up to 100 items to the left and right of the entry. The bookshelf displays items in the call number sequence regardless of library location. That’s even better than browsing the stacks!

VirtualBrowse

You can also browse through an alphabetic list of all titles, authors, or Library of Congress subject headings from the Libraries’ catalog. Select the Browse Search option at the top of the results page.

BrowseSearch
____
These new features are part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.




Research hint: Grab the formatted citation

Posted on


Citing references in your research paper? The easiest way to format a citation in the prescribed style may be to grab the citation from the Libraries’ catalog. If UT owns the item and there’s a record in the catalog, you can access a formatted citation from the brief record display (results from using the search box on the Libraries’ homepage).

Click the Details tab under the item’s brief record. Choose “Citation” from the Actions dropdown menu in the upper right of the Details box. Formatting options include the American Psychological Association, Modern Language Association, and Chicago/Turabian styles.

ActionsDropdown

styles

To format journal article citations, use a citation management tool like Zotero or EndNote.
____
This new feature is part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.




UT Joins HathiTrust Digital Library

Posted on


HathiLogoThe University of Tennessee, Knoxville is one of the newest members of HathiTrust, a partnership of more than 80 major academic and research libraries collaborating in an extraordinary digital library initiative to preserve and provide access to the published record in digital form.

As HathiTrust members, UT students, faculty, and staff gain:

    Online access to millions of public domain titles, including more than three million volumes not already in UT’s collections.

    The ability to create and save “virtual” collections for public or private use. Collection Builder allows users to create and save permanent or temporary collections that can be searched independently of the rest of the HathiTrust digital library.

    Better access for persons with print disabilities. UT students, faculty, and staff with print disabilities (such as vision impairments) also have online access to any UT-owned title (including in-copyright titles) in the HathiTrust digital library — more than 650,000 titles. These users may download a version of the title that is optimized for use with screen readers.

    A collaborative research center that supports digital scholarship. The HathiTrust Research Center is developing cutting-edge software and infrastructure to enable advanced computational access to digital texts in the HathiTrust library.

The UT Libraries gains a trusted repository for the long-term preservation of its holdings as well as persistent access to the digital collections.

“The Libraries are thrilled to be joining HathiTrust,” Holly Mercer, Associate Dean of Libraries for Scholarly Communication and Research Services, said. “The Libraries has a history of being committed to digital preservation and open access, and this partnership underscores our continued dedication to provide lasting access to scholarship.”

The Libraries’ new digital humanities librarian, Ashley Maynor, appreciates the potential benefits to UT scholars. “A number of UT’s faculty are already engaged in interesting digital projects: 3D visualization of ancient artifacts, data mining of historical texts,…. The tools under development at HathiTrust’s Research Center open up exciting new possibilities for both faculty and student scholars at UT,” says Maynor.

Since HathiTrust launched in 2008, partner libraries have contributed nearly 11 million volumes to the digital library.