The latest from the Smokies Project: The Photographs and Films of William Derris

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WalkerSisters2From the 1940s through the 1960s, William Derris, owner of the Derris Motel in Townsend, traveled by automobile around the accessible parts of the Smokies recording the people and scenery in both slides and silent film. He used the images and films to entertain and inform the guests at his hotel. His collection was donated to the UT Special Collections and is now the newest digital project from the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project and the UT Digital Library: digital.lib.utk.edu/derris.

As part of a student practicum project, approximately 340 of the 4400 slides were digitized to create the online presentation. These images document seasonal landscapes in Townsend, Tuckaleechee, Cades Cove, Newfound Gap and Fontana. Derris photographed the Walker Sisters, the most famous residents of Little Greenbrier, and many of the wildflowers he encountered on his travels.

CadesCoveThe films presented a unique opportunity for the team who worked on the collection. The original footage is on 8mm film spools. It includes not only films of the Smokies but many other locales as well. To create the digital collection, the films were first digitized and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips. Since the films were silent, the team decided to add folk music. Local musicians Chris Durman (also our Music Librarian), Steve White, and Leslie Gengozian recorded live music to accompany the films. The musical tunes were selected because there is evidence from folksong collectors that they were played in the Smokies. The result is a wonderful hybrid of new and old technology.




Letters from a Founding Father

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WashingtonLetterWilliam Blount and John Sevier are early American politicians that you would expect to be represented in the University of Tennessee Special Collections manuscript collection. But other members of our founding generation represented in UT’s Special Collections might surprise you. For example we have three items from George Washington, the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army and the new nation’s first President.

The first Washington letter that the library received was donated in 1945 by an alumnus, W. C. Taylor, who had bought the letter from the family of Major James Grant. Grant was an early Tennessee figure, who was involved in his friend William Blount’s conspiracy to seize Louisiana for Britain, and Florida for the United States. The letter was an introductory fragment of a message to William Blount from Washington; it expressed regret that the press of business at the end of the recent congressional session caused him to fall behind in his correspondence. Also part of the donation was a masonic medal, possibly of the Order of Cincinnatus, which Washington and Hamilton had established for former officers of the Continental Army. Grant family tradition held that the medal had been sent to Grant by Washington himself.

The second Washington letter came through another donation, the “Greer and Vinsinger Family Collection,” which consists mostly of material from their ancestor Col. Anthony Walton White. During the American Revolution, White fielded two cavalry regiments at his own expense. Also within this collection are letters from the Marquis de Lafayette, Alexander Hamilton, Horatio Gates, Henry Knox, Banastre Tarleton of the British army, and “Mad” Anthony Wayne. Washington’s letter orders White to send twelve horses to be used by Washington’s staff until their own horses can arrive, and to send an officer to convey instructions to Lafayette.

The third Washington item is contained in an autograph collection assembled by the university’s McClung Museum. Some of the material was donated by Judge and Mrs. John W. Greene when they donated their collection of McClung family papers. Other items came to the museum from various donors. Within the collection are not only letters from George Patton and Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Lee McClung’s correspondence with the actor William Gillette and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, but also letters from the founding generation such as John Marshall, Thomas Jefferson, the Marquis de Lafayette, “Light-Horse Harry” Lee, James Madison, as well as George Washington. The Washington item in the collection is his note written on a letter that had been sent his brother John Augustine Washington. The letter deals with the administration of justice in Pennsylvania over a land dispute. Washington’s note urges mediation as the best solution to the problem.

Thanks to the generosity of donors, students of the University of Tennessee can have the rare privilege of seeing and using letters of the “Father of our Country” George Washington and others of that great generation.




Research Hint: Sign-in to “Get It” Delivered

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The Libraries’ website allows you to request items online, but you must be signed-in to do so. If you access the website from off-campus — whether you’re a UTK-affiliated user or non-UTK user — you will not be able to see the full range of One Search results unless you sign-in prior to conducting your search.
ResearchHints3
Download a PDF of this
research hint here.

 

We recommend that all users begin a search by signing in, using the Off-campus users: Sign in button on the library homepage.

GetIt-1

 

Enter your search in the One Search box.

maya_onesearch

 

Results that display within the Get It tab are items available for either delivery or pickup.

GetIt-2

 

Failed to sign in? Click Sign-in for more options.

MoreOptions

 

Then request delivery of the Physical Item or a PDF Scan.

Physical&PDF

 

To pick up the Physical Item at one of our libraries, select a Pickup Location. UT faculty, graduate students, and staff may request Personal Delivery to a Work Address (i.e., department’s main office).

SelectLocation

 

To have a PDF Scan delivered to your email, note the book chapters or article pages to be scanned. Be sure to specify “pages” or “chapters.”

Page_Chapter

 

(More hints: How to expand your search results.)







Cutover to new library system over Winter Holiday

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Over the Winter Holiday the UT Libraries will transition to a new cloud-hosted “backend” for its integrated library system. Beginning at 8 p.m. on December 11, there will be a brief disruption of Library Express delivery, pick-up, and scan-on-demand services.

This past semester we launched a major upgrade to the Libraries’ discovery portal. By the time students return for the spring semester, our massive database of library holdings will reside in the cloud. And behind-the-scenes processing, such as ordering, cataloging, and circulation of library materials, also will take place in the cloud.

For the most part, changes will be completely invisible to the library user. But users will notice some improvements to the library catalog, such as fewer clicks to request items. Buttons to “View It” (for electronic items) or “Get It” (for physical items) will display along with the initial results to a OneSearch query.

Library Express delivery, pick-up, and scan-on-demand will be back in business on Monday, December 29. If users have questions about Library Express or document delivery services, they may phone 865-974-0021 or email express@nullutk.edu).




Libraries’ One Search goes live: expect many, many more hits!

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OneSearchOn Monday, August 18, our new One Search goes live! We’re launching a major upgrade to the Libraries’ discovery portal: the search box in the middle of library homepages will yield exponentially more results than in the past.

Now includes articles. One Search results include journal articles. Previously, articles could be found only by searching within individual databases.

Searches far beyond UT. Each search will likely return thousands more items than in the past because our new product (Primo Central) searches far beyond UT’s holdings.

Electronic full text. Searches will return many, many more items for which the full text is immediately available electronically. Look for the green radio button and “Full text available” or “Electronic full text.” To see the full text, select “View Online” and don’t be intimidated when another pre-populated search box pops up. Just pick one and “GO”!

More search hints:

Refine My Results

    . To “Refine My Results,” use the facets in the column to the left of the entries. Quickly narrow the results to “Articles” under “Resource Type.” Or expand a facet list (“Show more”) and select “Refine results” to limit hits to several, selected Resource Types, Collections, Topics, etc.

Expand My Results

    . Want to see an even larger universe of resources? Check “Include resources without electronic full-text.”

Want local holdings only?

    To limit search results to only those items owned by UT, click the “UT Collections” tab at the top of the results page. For a known-item search, select “Browse UT Collections” and enter a new title, author, subject, or call number search to browse through an alphabetic or numeric list of our holdings.

What am I searching?

    Click this link for details about One Search.

One Search vs. databases

    . Accessing the full content and full functionality of

some

    databases still requires searching from within the database interface (

lib.utk.edu/databases

    ). Unsure? Ask a librarian.

Tutorial

    . A One Search tutorial is available at:

dlwork.lib.utk.edu/gots/tutorial/one-search

Yes, One Search is easier… it’s broader… it’s better. But it’s also far more complex. All the more reason to ask a librarian. Visit the Research Assistance Desk (in Hodges, that’s Room 209) or AskUsNow (lib.utk.edu/askusnow) via phone, chat, text, or email.




3D printing turns library users into industrial designers

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Last year, the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library added 3D printing to the technology they provide to library users. 3D printing lets designers rapidly turn their ideas into plastic prototypes. Engineering students from the College of Agriculture are using the AgVet library’s 3D printer to test their design ideas.

The library’s IT technologist, Richie Sexton, spearheaded the project to offer 3D printing. A story in today’s Knoxzine features Richie explaining the operation and benefits of 3D printing. Check it out.

[Here are guidelines for 3D printing at the Pendergrass Library.]




Map Collection Moves, Makes Room for More Study Space in Hodges Library

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The UT Libraries’ Map Collection is relocating, making room for more study space on the ground floor of Hodges Library. Map Services closes May 6 to begin preparing for the move.

Over the summer, the remainder of the map collection will be moved to new quarters in the James D. Hoskins Library (1401 Cumberland Avenue). The entire collection will once again be in one place, and the map collections will be staffed and remain accessible after the relocation takes place. The vacated space on the ground floor of Hodges Library will serve as study space and overflow seating for One Stop. The renovated space should open before fall semester.

Geospatial services (GIS assistance, geospatial data, etc.) will be relocated to Commons South alongside new scholarly digital services.

Library users will have access to the map collections by visiting the Storage Reading Room, 200 Hoskins Library.

If you’ve never visited the Hoskins Library, a pleasant surprise awaits you. The James D. Hoskins Library, designed by renowned architect Charles Barber and built between 1929 and 1931, is collegiate Gothic in style and features vaulted ceilings decorated with literary inscriptions. The main campus library moved from the Hoskins Library to the renovated Hodges Library in 1987.

Please bear with us as we relocate services.




Research hint: Virtual browsing

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There’s nothing like the serendipity of browsing the stacks and discovering that one book that is the perfect reference on your topic.

Well, actually, there is. Now there’s virtual browsing in the Libraries’ online catalog.

If the search box on the Libraries’ homepage leads you to a promising title, you can browse adjacent titles in the call number sequence.

After initiating a search, you should see the Virtual Browse tab listed on the brief record for any title having a call number.

Click Virtual Browse to view a virtual shelf of book covers. The virtual bookshelf allows you to browse up to 100 items to the left and right of the entry. The bookshelf displays items in the call number sequence regardless of library location. That’s even better than browsing the stacks!

VirtualBrowse

You can also browse through an alphabetic list of all titles, authors, or Library of Congress subject headings from the Libraries’ catalog. Select the Browse Search option at the top of the results page.

BrowseSearch
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These new features are part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.




Research hint: Grab the formatted citation

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Citing references in your research paper? The easiest way to format a citation in the prescribed style may be to grab the citation from the Libraries’ catalog. If UT owns the item and there’s a record in the catalog, you can access a formatted citation from the brief record display (results from using the search box on the Libraries’ homepage).

Click the Details tab under the item’s brief record. Choose “Citation” from the Actions dropdown menu in the upper right of the Details box. Formatting options include the American Psychological Association, Modern Language Association, and Chicago/Turabian styles.

ActionsDropdown

styles

To format journal article citations, use a citation management tool like Zotero or EndNote.
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This new feature is part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.