Test-drive the Libraries’ New Homepage

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homepageThe UT Libraries will soon launch a new homepage. The new page will go live immediately following spring semester. In the meantime, users can test-drive our leaner, cleaner homepage at lib.utk.edu/testing.

Our new homepage has fewer distracting graphics. A slimmer OneSearch box and the smaller footprint of the page reduce the need for vertical scrolling. These enhancements were made in response to suggestions from our users.

The cleaner design should help users locate information quickly. Popular destinations such as “My Account” and “Reserve a Room” are featured on conspicuous links at the center of the page. Links to research help appear in the right-hand column, including the chat box and customized help for different library constituencies.

And library news and events get more prominent billing.

Library Marketing and Communications would like your opinion on the redesigned homepage. Please send comments and suggestions to rbedenbaugh@nullutk.edu.




Manage Citations with EndNote and Zotero

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Want to get control of your citations? Try a citation management tool like EndNote or Zotero. Both programs allow you to organize, format and insert your references into a paper.

EndNote is free to UT students, faculty, and staff through a UT site license. It is available in both a desktop and a more user-friendly web version. Zotero is free, open source software that works on its own or as a plug-in for your web browser.

See the Libraries’ research guide for a comparison of EndNote and Zotero features.

There are librarians and video tutorials to help get you started with EndNote or Zotero. And watch for library workshops. Citation management programs can save you time and help keep you organized!




Top ten things you should know about the libraries

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UT’s libraries offer more services than you think. Here are the top ten things you should know about the libraries:

1. Ask Us Now. By chat, text, phone, email, walk-in, or by appointment — from finding an article to the most abstruse research problem — librarians are here to help. Check out all your options for research assistance here.

2. Every area of study has its own librarian. The university’s Subject Librarians are experts in their academic disciplines. They understand the research methods and know the specialized literature in their fields. Chemistry? There’s a librarian for that. Architecture? There’s a librarian for that. Find yours here.

3. There’s a study space in the library to accommodate every learning style. In the Hodges Library there are Quiet Study floors (floors 1, 4, 5) and Group Study floors (floors 2, 3, 6). There are quiet nooks for individual study. There are Study Rooms and Practice Presentation Rooms where you can rehearse for that big speech. There are even collaborative workspaces where your work group can plug in their own laptops to confer on group projects. Reserve study rooms here.
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4. From academic coaching to tutoring in math, there’s all kinds of help right there, in the library. The Student Success Center, Math Tutorial Center, Stat Lab, and Writing Center all have outposts in the Commons on the 2nd floor of Hodges Library.

5. In addition to books, the library lends laptops and video cameras. Through the library, you have access to all the latest technology (laptops, video cameras, lighting kits…you name it). Here is a full list of equipment available from the Commons.

6. The library will help you use media to enhance your project. Why be plain vanilla when you can be media-enhanced? The Studio in Hodges Library provides media workstations, audio and video recording studios, and instruction in their use. Amaze your friends. Amaze your instructors. (Amaze yourself.)
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7. Researching online? The library is still your best guide. The library has created online guides to the fundamentals of research and the most authoritative sources in the various academic disciplines. Check out our many research guides.)

8. There are special libraries for students in agriculture, veterinary medicine, and music. Two conveniently located branch libraries serve the specialized needs of those disciplines: the George F. DeVine Music Library (G4, Natalie L. Haslam Music Center) and the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library. (Please note: Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library will temporarily relocate during summer 2015.)

9. The library is preserving bits of Tennessee history and other rare and unique items. Civil War-era letters and diaries. Nineteenth-century photographs of the Great Smoky Mountains. The editorial cartoons of Charlie Daniel. All have been preserved by Special Collections. Selected images from each of the above-mentioned collections are available online as digital collections. Other rare and unique research materials are made available to researchers — including student researchers — in the Special Collections reading room, 121 Hodges Library.
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10. You’re social. We’re social. We’d like to invite you to join us on social media. We’re on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram. Join us, also, for contests (like our Student Art in the Library contest) and public programming (like our Writers in the Library series of readings by noted authors).




New Digital Collection: Smokies Photos, Film Clips Set to Music

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The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries has created an online digital collection of photos and home movies of the Smokies taken in the 1940s,’50s, and ’60s by a Townsend businessman. Folksongs performed by local musicians have been added to the originally silent film clips.

Watch and listen: Views of Gatlinburg in 1941.
[Music recorded by Chris Durman (guitar) and Steve White (mandolin), January 2015.]

The William Derris Collection, comprised of 334 slides and twelve film clips, is available online for free at http://digital.lib.utk.edu/derris.

William Derris, owner of the Derris Motel in Townsend, Tennessee, crisscrossed the Great Smoky Mountains by automobile, recording the people and scenery in both slides and silent film. He used the images and films to entertain and inform the guests at his motel. Derris’s images document landscapes, flora, wildlife and people in and around the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, including Townsend, Tuckaleechee, Cades Cove, Wears Valley, Little Greenbrier and Fontana.

Approximately 4,400 slides and eight reels of 8mm film shot by Derris were donated to the UT Libraries. The film footage was first digitized, and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips.

Chris Durman, librarian at UT’s George F. DeVine Music Library, selected appropriate traditional songs to enhance the film clips and recruited local musicians to record the tunes. Steve White (on mandolin), Leslie Gengozian (violin) and Chris Durman (guitar, banjo, harmonica), performed the 16 public domain folksongs that were added to the film clips. The songs are all traditional Southern Appalachian tunes that were played in the Great Smoky Mountains region, according to folksong collectors.

The William Derris Collection is the latest in a growing list of digital photograph collections created by the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project that cover more than 100 years of life in the Smokies.

The Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project, an undertaking of the UT Libraries, provides support for researchers at all levels who study the Smokies and the surrounding communities. Learn more about the project at http://lib.utk.edu/smokies.

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UT Joins Digital Public Library of America

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The University of Tennessee Libraries has partnered with the Tennessee State Library and Archives and the Tenn-Share statewide library consortium to become a service hub for the Digital Public Library of America.

Tennessee’s service hub was one of four successful applicants added to the DPLA network in February 2015.

For most of American history, the ability to access materials for free through public libraries has been a central part of the culture, producing generations of avid readers and a knowledgeable, engaged citizenry. The DPLA sustains that tradition by bringing together the riches of America’s libraries, archives and museums, and making them freely available online through a single platform and portal.

Tennessee service hub partners will identify and recruit other cultural heritage institutions in the state that can contribute content. Initially the hub will collect materials on Appalachia, the Great Smoky Mountains and the civil rights movement.

The DPLA’s portal will deliver Tennessee’s digitized cultural heritage to students, teachers, scholars and the public. The DPLA interface offers innovative new ways for researchers to discover and use the millions of collected digital objects, including online texts, photographs, manuscripts and artwork.

Tennessee service hub partners will digitize materials and enhance their discovery through descriptive metadata.

“I’m pleased UT can provide the technical support to make Tennessee’s digital cultural heritage collections available to the world,” said Holly Mercer, associate dean for research and scholarly communication at the UT Libraries. “The Digital Public Library of America is a portal to valuable resources and an exemplar of successful collaboration.”

The DPLA was first envisioned in 2010 by leaders from libraries, foundations, academia and technology projects. Early development was hosted at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. The DPLA is now a nonprofit corporation based at the Boston Public Library.

For more information, visit http://dp.la.




The latest from the Smokies Project: The Photographs and Films of William Derris

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WalkerSisters2From the 1940s through the 1960s, William Derris, owner of the Derris Motel in Townsend, traveled by automobile around the accessible parts of the Smokies recording the people and scenery in both slides and silent film. He used the images and films to entertain and inform the guests at his hotel. His collection was donated to the UT Special Collections and is now the newest digital project from the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project and the UT Digital Library: digital.lib.utk.edu/derris.

As part of a student practicum project, approximately 340 of the 4400 slides were digitized to create the online presentation. These images document seasonal landscapes in Townsend, Tuckaleechee, Cades Cove, Newfound Gap and Fontana. Derris photographed the Walker Sisters, the most famous residents of Little Greenbrier, and many of the wildflowers he encountered on his travels.

CadesCoveThe films presented a unique opportunity for the team who worked on the collection. The original footage is on 8mm film spools. It includes not only films of the Smokies but many other locales as well. To create the digital collection, the films were first digitized and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips. Since the films were silent, the team decided to add folk music. Local musicians Chris Durman (also our Music Librarian), Steve White, and Leslie Gengozian recorded live music to accompany the films. The musical tunes were selected because there is evidence from folksong collectors that they were played in the Smokies. The result is a wonderful hybrid of new and old technology.




Letters from a Founding Father

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WashingtonLetterWilliam Blount and John Sevier are early American politicians that you would expect to be represented in the University of Tennessee Special Collections manuscript collection. But other members of our founding generation represented in UT’s Special Collections might surprise you. For example we have three items from George Washington, the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army and the new nation’s first President.

The first Washington letter that the library received was donated in 1945 by an alumnus, W. C. Taylor, who had bought the letter from the family of Major James Grant. Grant was an early Tennessee figure, who was involved in his friend William Blount’s conspiracy to seize Louisiana for Britain, and Florida for the United States. The letter was an introductory fragment of a message to William Blount from Washington; it expressed regret that the press of business at the end of the recent congressional session caused him to fall behind in his correspondence. Also part of the donation was a masonic medal, possibly of the Order of Cincinnatus, which Washington and Hamilton had established for former officers of the Continental Army. Grant family tradition held that the medal had been sent to Grant by Washington himself.

The second Washington letter came through another donation, the “Greer and Vinsinger Family Collection,” which consists mostly of material from their ancestor Col. Anthony Walton White. During the American Revolution, White fielded two cavalry regiments at his own expense. Also within this collection are letters from the Marquis de Lafayette, Alexander Hamilton, Horatio Gates, Henry Knox, Banastre Tarleton of the British army, and “Mad” Anthony Wayne. Washington’s letter orders White to send twelve horses to be used by Washington’s staff until their own horses can arrive, and to send an officer to convey instructions to Lafayette.

The third Washington item is contained in an autograph collection assembled by the university’s McClung Museum. Some of the material was donated by Judge and Mrs. John W. Greene when they donated their collection of McClung family papers. Other items came to the museum from various donors. Within the collection are not only letters from George Patton and Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Lee McClung’s correspondence with the actor William Gillette and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, but also letters from the founding generation such as John Marshall, Thomas Jefferson, the Marquis de Lafayette, “Light-Horse Harry” Lee, James Madison, as well as George Washington. The Washington item in the collection is his note written on a letter that had been sent his brother John Augustine Washington. The letter deals with the administration of justice in Pennsylvania over a land dispute. Washington’s note urges mediation as the best solution to the problem.

Thanks to the generosity of donors, students of the University of Tennessee can have the rare privilege of seeing and using letters of the “Father of our Country” George Washington and others of that great generation.




Research Hint: Sign-in to “Get It” Delivered

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The Libraries’ website allows you to request items online, but you must be signed-in to do so. If you access the website from off-campus — whether you’re a UTK-affiliated user or non-UTK user — you will not be able to see the full range of One Search results unless you sign-in prior to conducting your search.
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Download a PDF of this
research hint here.

 

We recommend that all users begin a search by signing in, using the Off-campus users: Sign in button on the library homepage.

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Enter your search in the One Search box.

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Results that display within the Get It tab are items available for either delivery or pickup.

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Failed to sign in? Click Sign-in for more options.

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Then request delivery of the Physical Item or a PDF Scan.

Physical&PDF

 

To pick up the Physical Item at one of our libraries, select a Pickup Location. UT faculty, graduate students, and staff may request Personal Delivery to a Work Address (i.e., department’s main office).

SelectLocation

 

To have a PDF Scan delivered to your email, note the book chapters or article pages to be scanned. Be sure to specify “pages” or “chapters.”

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(More hints: How to expand your search results.)







Cutover to new library system over Winter Holiday

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Over the Winter Holiday the UT Libraries will transition to a new cloud-hosted “backend” for its integrated library system. Beginning at 8 p.m. on December 11, there will be a brief disruption of Library Express delivery, pick-up, and scan-on-demand services.

This past semester we launched a major upgrade to the Libraries’ discovery portal. By the time students return for the spring semester, our massive database of library holdings will reside in the cloud. And behind-the-scenes processing, such as ordering, cataloging, and circulation of library materials, also will take place in the cloud.

For the most part, changes will be completely invisible to the library user. But users will notice some improvements to the library catalog, such as fewer clicks to request items. Buttons to “View It” (for electronic items) or “Get It” (for physical items) will display along with the initial results to a OneSearch query.

Library Express delivery, pick-up, and scan-on-demand will be back in business on Monday, December 29. If users have questions about Library Express or document delivery services, they may phone 865-974-0021 or email express@nullutk.edu).