New Streaming Movie Option!

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Alien Movie PosterIn addition to our popular Residence Life Cinema, we have added Criterion-On-Demand USA to our suite of streaming services. Criterion-On-Demand USA has a collection of over 600 films available at all times.

Films from this service are available off campus, and can even be downloaded to a computer for 48 hours.  Off campus users will be asked for their Net ID and password (just like some of the databases do when accessing off campus). This service requires a download of “Criterion Silverlight Player”, which most of you have already downloaded. Films can be streamed with or without subtitles, and they can be watched individually but cannot be shown at group events.

Criterion-On-Demand USA offers films from 20th Century Fox, Paramount Pictures, Dreamworks SKG, MTV Films, Open Road Films, Fox Searchlight, and some additional smaller studios. New films are added quarterly. Please note that this is not the Criterion Collection of remade classic films and art films. You can begin watching anytime at the following URL:  http://s.lib.utk.edu/criterion




3D printing turns library users into industrial designers

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Last year, the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library added 3D printing to the technology they provide to library users. 3D printing lets designers rapidly turn their ideas into plastic prototypes. Engineering students from the College of Agriculture are using the AgVet library’s 3D printer to test their design ideas.

The library’s IT technologist, Richie Sexton, spearheaded the project to offer 3D printing. A story in today’s Knoxzine features Richie explaining the operation and benefits of 3D printing. Check it out.

[Here are guidelines for 3D printing at the Pendergrass Library.]




UT Libraries Acquires Two Historically Significant First Editions

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Two historically important books, acquired by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have been added to the library’s special collections.

Phillis Wheatley was an enslaved person in the household of a prosperous Boston family. Her Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (published 1773) was the first published book by an African-American woman.

Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk* (published 1833) was transcribed and translated into English from the testimony of the Sauk chief who waged war on the United States in 1832. Black Hawk’s Life was one of the first Native American autobiographies published in the United States.

The UT Libraries recently purchased rare first editions of both works. The copy of Wheatley’s Poems is a particularly noteworthy specimen. It contains an extremely rare inscription by the poet herself.

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Frontispiece to Phillis Wheatley’s Poems

Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784) was a child of approximately seven years old when she was captured by slavers in west Africa, transported to America, and sold at auction in the slave market of Boston, Massachusetts, to John and Susanna Wheatley. John Wheatley gave her the name of the slave ship, the Phillis, aboard which she had made the grueling Atlantic crossing.

The Wheatley family began tutoring Phillis in English, Latin, and the Bible, and the young slave quickly displayed a facility for learning.

The verses in Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral are filled with classical allusions. Many are elegies to the great men of the day. Her elegy on the death of the popular preacher George Whitefield, published in Boston, Philadelphia, New York, and London when Wheatley was just 17 years old, gained her considerable notoriety. Susanna Wheatley tried to capitalize on her servant’s success to publish the verses but was unable to secure sufficient subscriptions to underwrite the cost of publication in the American colonies.

In the eighteenth century, the intellectual and creative capabilities of Africans were a subject of debate, and the reading public was skeptical of a literary work attributed to a slave. In 1772 Phillis Wheatley was called before a group of Boston’s leading citizens to defend the authenticity of her work.

The august body was convinced of her authorship. The Poems were printed in London and widely acclaimed. Wheatley was feted on two continents and met many notables, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin.

Wheatley was emancipated from slavery in 1773, but her life as a free woman was brief and fraught. She died in childbirth in 1784 at the age of 31.

The 1773 edition of Phillis Wheatley’s poems purchased by the UT Libraries, sadly, is missing the original frontispiece, a rare depiction of an individual female slave — a pensive Wheatley at work on a poem.

Wheatley’s slender volume of poetry, a signal literary achievement by an enslaved African, influenced the discourse on slavery in America.

Black Hawk’s recounting of his life and the Sauk insurrection influenced another debate, over the rights of America’s indigenous peoples.

White settlers began encroaching upon the Sauk nation’s ancestral homelands in the early decades of the nineteenth century, challenging the Sauk’s sovereign right to their land. The Sauk and other tribes living east of the Mississippi River were pushed to lands west of the river.

Chief Black Hawk (1767-1838) and other members of the Sauk questioned the validity of the treaty ostensibly ceding their lands. In 1832, Black Hawk and a group of several hundred men, women, and children attempted to resettle on tribal lands.

Whatever Black Hawk’s intentions, United States officials were convinced that his band was hostile. When Black Hawk sent a peace delegation to meet the approaching army, the three warriors waving a white flag were fired upon. Thus began the brief encounter known as the Black Hawk War. During ensuing skirmishes, Black Hawk’s small band gained several successes before a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Bad Axe. Black Hawk escaped capture at Bad Axe but later surrendered.

Transferred to Fort Monroe in Virginia, Black Hawk and other imprisoned leaders of the uprising were paraded in public — not as reviled enemies but as celebrities. Along the eastern seaboard, far from frontier hostilities, the romanticizing of the “noble savage” was already underway. The prisoners posed for portraits, toured Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York City, and even met briefly with President Andrew Jackson.

After a few months, Black Hawk and the other leaders were released. Black Hawk’s autobiography, dictated to a government interpreter, was published in 1833. It became an instant bestseller, going through five printings within a year.

The Black Hawk first edition also is a scarce treasure.

Katy Chiles, the UT professor who brought the item to the Libraries’ attention, appreciates the cultural significance and research value of both first editions. Her research on early American literatures and print culture studies involves looking at early editions of rare texts and analyzing how each different publication presented itself to readers in different and important ways. “In my work on Black Hawks’ Life, I am investigating how American publishers produced frontispieces, prefaces, and book bindings for the text’s earliest publications to influence the meaning of the War of 1812, the 1832 Black Hawk War, and, more broadly, British, U.S., and Indian relations,” Chiles told librarians when recommending the acquisition. “I also analyze the differences between texts, such as prefaces and frontispieces that play an important role in how ‘the Indian’ is represented. Access to first editions is key to enabling this kind of analysis. Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk is a crucially important book in understanding and appreciating what indigenous peoples have done with print.” Chiles teaches African-American, Native American, and early American literature in the UT Department of English.

Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral and Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk are now available to scholars of American history and literature in the UT Libraries’ Special Collections. The acquisitions complement the UT Libraries’ excellent holdings of early American imprints.

* Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk, embracing the tradition of his nation — Indian wars in which he has been engaged — cause of joining the British in their late war with America, and its history — description of the Rock-River village — manners and customs — encroachments by the whites, contrary to treaty — removal from his village in 1831. With an account of the cause and general history of the late war, his surrender and confinement at Jefferson barracks, and travels through the United States.




Comprehensive Bibliography of the Smokies Now Available

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TerraThe culmination of fifteen years of research, Terra Incognita: An Annotated Bibliography of the Great Smoky Mountains, 1544-1934 is the most comprehensive bibliography of sources related to the Great Smoky Mountains ever created. The book is now available for purchase from the University of Tennessee Press.

Terra Incognita catalogs printed material on the Great Smoky Mountains from the earliest map documenting the De Soto expedition in the 16th century to writings that were instrumental in the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each chapter, introduced by a substantive essay, details published works on a different aspect of the history, peoples, culture, and natural history of the Smokies region. There are chapters, for instance, on the Cherokee, early explorers, music, mountain life, and the national park movement.

The authoritative and meticulously researched work is an indispensable reference for scholars and students studying any aspect of the region’s past. According to author and historian Jim Casada, “Terra Incognita belongs in every academic library in the country and locals who simply cherish the Smokies will want to have it on their shelves.”

The title for the bibliography comes from a remark by Horace Kephart, an early twentieth-century chronicler of mountain culture and an important force behind the founding of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Researching the region prior to his first visit in 1904, Kephart found the Great Smoky Mountains to be a “terra incognita.” Little to nothing, it seemed, could be found in libraries to elucidate the land or its people. This new bibliography rectifies that omission by bringing together the scattered and obscure early accounts of the Smokies. (Kephart is the only individual to merit a separate chapter in Terra Incognita.)

Terra Incognita was compiled and edited by three librarians. Anne Bridges and Ken Wise are associate professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries and co-directors of the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project (www.lib.utk.edu/smokies). Russell Clement, emeritus faculty at Northwestern University, worked for many years in academic libraries, most recently as head of the art collection at Northwestern.

An online database, Database of the Smokies (dots.lib.utk.edu), updates Terra Incognita with citations to material published since 1934, the date the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established.

___
Contact:

Anne Bridges, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-0017, abridges@nullutk.edu)

Ken Wise, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-2359, kwise@nullutk.edu)

Ordering information: http://utpress.org




Information Is Our Game: Meet Steven Milewski

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MilewskiCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As Digital Media Technologies Librarian, Steven Milewski is our expert on streaming collections and technologies. With Steven’s guidance, the UT Libraries is building a collection of streamed media to support teaching and research. Steven is in charge of selecting video content, digitizing existing media holdings, and acquiring rights to streamed media, as well as maintaining the infrastructure that allows faculty and students to view streamed video from any computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

He can help library users extract video clips for use in presentations and help instructors embed videos in their class’s Blackboard site. Explore Steven’s online guide to finding and using streamed content relevant to your discipline at libguides.utk.edu/streaming.

Steven is the subject librarian for Social Work, providing information literacy instruction, research consultations, and collection development for that college. He also serves as the Libraries’ liaison to the UT Office of Disability Services. Over the past year, he has purchased new adaptive equipment and software for the library.

Steven holds a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s in information science from UT.




Information Is Our Game: Meet Allison Sharp

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SharpCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As a member of the Libraries’ Learning, Research, and Engagement team, Allison Sharp focuses much of her time on library instruction, programming activities, and services that contribute to student success.

Allison enjoys teaching research skills in the conventional classroom setting, but she is equally enthusiastic about programs, such as DeStress for Success, that chiefly aim to engage students in the college experience. She is motivated by the desire to help students feel comfortable and competent as library users and researchers at the University of Tennessee.

Allison connects well with students from diverse backgrounds. She has developed strong relationships with international programs at the university and has proven herself to be an invaluable instructor and mentor to international students.

As librarian for the Africana Studies Program and the School of Information Sciences, she provides research assistance, instruction, and collection development for those disciplines.

Allison holds a bachelor’s in psychology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and a master’s in library and information science from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. She is pursuing a PhD in communication and information at UT.




Information Is Our Game: Meet Holly Mercer

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MercerCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Research Services, Holly Mercer directs the Libraries’ services to scholars. She oversees digital initiatives; research and grants; data curation; digital publishing and production; digital humanities; and the Libraries’ department of learning, research, and engagement.

Digital technologies have transformed academic libraries. New modes of inquiry and dissemination of scholarship engage librarians in the research process from creation to preservation. Under Holly’s leadership, librarians help researchers take advantage of emerging technologies to model, publish, and preserve their research.

Holly’s division offers support for open access publishing and helps scholars meet the data management requirements of granting agencies. Her group manages Trace, UT’s showcase and archive of creative and scholarly work, as well as a digital imprint, Newfound Press, that publishes peer-reviewed books and multimedia works.

Over the past year, Holly spearheaded UT’s membership in the Library Publishing Coalition and HathiTrust. The Library Publishing Coalition addresses changes in scholarly publishing that impact academic libraries. HathiTrust is a partnership of major academic and research libraries collaborating in a digital library initiative to preserve and provide access to the published record in digital form. Joining HathiTrust immediately secured online access for UT users to more than 3.4 million volumes in the public domain.

Holly holds a master’s in library and information science from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor’s degree in classical studies from Duke University. She currently serves on committees of several projects of national and international scope, including DataONE and the Library Publishing Coalition.




Top 10 Things You Should Know about the Libraries

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The end of the semester is approaching faster than you think. As finals hurtle toward you, here are the top ten things you should know about the libraries :

1. Ask Us Now. By chat, text, phone, email, walk-in, or by appointment — from finding an article to the most abstruse research problem — librarians are here to help. Check out all your options for research assistance here.

2. Every area of study has its own librarian. The university’s Subject Librarians are experts in their academic disciplines. They understand the research methods and know the specialized literature in their fields. Chemistry? There’s a librarian for that. Architecture? There’s a librarian for that. Find yours here.

3. There’s a study space in the library to accommodate every learning style. In the Hodges Library there are Quiet Study floors (floors 1, 4, 5) and Group Study floors (floors 2, 3, 6). There are quiet nooks for individual study. There are Study Rooms and Practice Presentation Rooms where you can rehearse for that big speech. There are even collaborative workspaces where your work group can plug in their own laptops to confer on group projects.
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4. From academic coaching to tutoring in math, there’s all kinds of help right there, in the library. The Student Success Center, Math Tutorial Center, Stat Lab, and Writing Center all have outposts in the Commons on the 2nd floor of Hodges Library.

5. In addition to books, the library lends laptops and video cameras. Through the library, you have access to all the latest technology (laptops, video cameras, lighting kits…you name it). Here is a full list of equipment available from the Commons.

6. The library will help you use media to enhance your project. Why be plain vanilla when you can be media-enhanced? The Studio in Hodges Library provides media workstations, audio and video recording studios, and instruction in their use. Amaze your friends. Amaze your instructors. (Amaze yourself.)
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7. Researching online? The library is still your best guide. The library has created online guides to the fundamentals of research and the most authoritative sources in the various academic disciplines. (Check out these LibGuides.) To get free access to the full features and complete content of many online databases and scholarly journals, you must link to those resources through the Libraries’ gateway. Even if you start with Google, you’ll put the best finish on your project if you end with the library. (Start here.)

8. There are special libraries for students in agriculture, veterinary medicine, and music. Two conveniently located branch libraries serve the specialized needs of those disciplines: the George F. DeVine Music Library (G4, Natalie L. Haslam Music Center) and the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library (A113, UT Veterinary Medical Center).

9. The library is preserving bits of Tennessee history and other rare and unique items. Davy Crockett Almanacs. Civil War-era letters and diaries. Nineteenth-century photographs of the Great Smoky Mountains. The editorial cartoons of Charlie Daniel. All have been preserved by Special Collections. And a selection of those last three are available online as digital collections here. (By the way, check out the UT historical photo exhibit on Classroom Row on the 2nd floor of Hodges Library.) Other rare and unique research materials are made available to researchers — including student researchers — in the Special Collections reading room, 121 Hodges Library.
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10. You’re social. We’re social. We’d like to invite you to join us on social media. We’re on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram. Join us, also, for contests (like our Student Art in the Library contest) and public programming (like our Writers in the Library series of readings by noted authors).