New Streaming Movie Option!

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In addition to our popular Residence Life Cinema, we have added Criterion-On-Demand USA to our suite of streaming services. Criterion-On-Demand USA has a collection of over 600 films Alien Movie Posteravailable at all times.

Films from this service are available off campus, and can even be downloaded to a computer for 48 hours.  Off campus users will be asked for their Net ID and password (just like some of the databases do when accessing off campus). This service requires a download of “Criterion Silverlight Player”, which most of you have already downloaded. Films can be streamed with or without subtitles, and they can be watched individually but cannot be shown at group events.

Criterion-On-Demand USA offers films from 20th Century Fox, Paramount Pictures, Dreamworks SKG, MTV Films, Open Road Films, Fox Searchlight, and some additional smaller studios. New films are added quarterly. Please note that this is not the Criterion Collection of remade classic films and art films. You can begin watching anytime at the following URL:  http://tiny.utk.edu/criterion




“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms” Natural History Illustration Exhibit at McClung Museum

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BBB_Banner_p815A new exhibit exploring natural history illustration from the 1500s to the 1800s opens Friday, September 12, at UT’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture. Some of the rare books on display are on loan from the University Libraries’ Special Collections. Special Collections items include works of zoological and botanical illustration, notably a 1665 imprint of the historic Micrographia, by Robert Hooke.

“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms: Natural History Illustration from the 1500s–1800s” will run through January 4, 2015, and explores over 300 years of the intersection of science and art in natural history illustration.

More than fifty rare books, prints, and objects are on view, highlighting how increasing access to books, travel, and technology, as well as the evolution of knowledge, changed the way in which illustrations were created and interpreted. From fantastical images of beasts in the 1500s, to extremely accurate depictions of plants and animals in the 1800s, the illustrations in the exhibit demonstrate the rapid advances of natural history during the print age.

Several exhibit-related programs are planned. Free family programming includes exhibit-related Family Fun Days on September 27 and November 1, and a Stroller Tour for parents, caregivers and young children on October 6.

Other programming includes a natural history illustration workshop, “Using Scratchboard to Create Lifelike Illustrations” on October 5, and lectures on natural history and illustration by Barney Lipscomb, Leonhardt Chair of Botany at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas, on October 22, and UT Professor of History Denise Phillips on November 6.

See the exhibit page for more programming details: http://tiny.utk.edu/birdsbugsblooms.

“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms” is curated by Catherine Shteynberg and Christine Dano Johnson. Lenders include Arader Galleries, Dr. Gordon Burghardt, the National Museum of Health and Medicine, and UT Special Collections. The exhibit is presented by Arader Galleries, W. Graham Arader III, UT Federal Credit Union, the Ready for the World Initiative, ARAMARK, Bennett Galleries, and the Ardath & Joel E. Rynning Museum Fund. Additional support is provided by Knox County, the City of Knoxville, and the Arts & Heritage Fund.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on the weekdays. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.

Additional parking information is available at http://mcclungmuseum.utk.edu/visit/parking.

For more information about the McClung Museum and its collections and exhibits, visit http://mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.




B.J. (Bob) Leggett leads off “Writers in the Library”

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BJLeggett_smallAuthor B.J. Leggett will give the first “Writers in the Library” reading of the 2014-15 academic year. Leggett will read from his latest novel, Prosperity, on Monday, September 15, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Prosperity tells the story of police lieutenant Robert O’Brian, who takes early retirement after being shot in a drug raid and returns to his hometown of Prosperity in the mountains of Eastern Tennessee to work on a second novel. But O’Brian’s plans are unexpectedly disrupted when he becomes involved in the investigation of the death of a high school friend.

B.J. (Bob) Leggett is professor emeritus at UT Knoxville, where he held the title of Distinguished Professor of Humanities. He is the author of numerous studies of modern poetry and criticism, including books on A. E. Housman, Philip Larkin, and Wallace Stevens. Prosperity is his second novel. The first, Playing Out the String, was published by Livingston Press in 2004.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Other authors scheduled to read this semester are, in order of appearance, Amy Billone, Elizabeth McCracken, Keith Flynn, Joyce Jenkins, and David James Poissant. For a schedule of upcoming readings and videos of past events, visit lib.utk.edu/writers.

The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. Writers in the Library events are emceed by the Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, Christopher Hebert.




Libraries’ One Search goes live: expect many, many more hits!

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OneSearchOn Monday, August 18, our new One Search goes live! We’re launching a major upgrade to the Libraries’ discovery portal: the search box in the middle of library homepages will yield exponentially more results than in the past.

Now includes articles. One Search results include journal articles. Previously, articles could be found only by searching within individual databases.

Searches far beyond UT. Each search will likely return thousands more items than in the past because our new product (Primo Central) searches far beyond UT’s holdings.

Electronic full text. Searches will return many, many more items for which the full text is immediately available electronically. Look for the green radio button and “Full text available” or “Electronic full text.” To see the full text, select “View Online” and don’t be intimidated when another pre-populated search box pops up. Just pick one and “GO”!

More search hints:

    Refine My Results. To “Refine My Results,” use the facets in the column to the left of the entries. Quickly narrow the results to “Articles” under “Resource Type.” Or expand a facet list (“Show more”) and select “Refine results” to limit hits to several, selected Resource Types, Collections, Topics, etc.
    Expand My Results. Want to see an even larger universe of resources? Check “Include resources without electronic full-text.”
    Want local holdings only? To limit search results to only those items owned by UT, click the “UT Collections” tab at the top of the results page. For a known-item search, select “Browse UT Collections” and enter a new title, author, subject, or call number search to browse through an alphabetic or numeric list of our holdings.
    One Search vs. databases. Accessing the full content and full functionality of some databases still requires searching from within the database interface (lib.utk.edu/databases). Unsure? Ask a librarian.

Yes, One Search is easier… it’s broader… it’s better. But it’s also far more complex. All the more reason to ask a librarian. Visit the Research Assistance Desk (in Hodges, that’s Room 209) or AskUsNow (lib.utk.edu/askusnow) via phone, chat, text, or email.




Attention, student artists: library seeks works for juried exhibition

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Koczo400xThe UT Libraries is seeking student artworks for the Student Art in the Library juried exhibition. The contest awards a First Prize of $300, Second Prize of $150, and Third Prize of $75. Selected two-dimensional works (drawings, graphic design, prints, photography, ceramics, painting) will be on display in the exhibit area during the fall semester. The contest is open to all currently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students, in any discipline. Submission deadline is midnight, September 21.

More info at lib.utk.edu/artinlibrary.




3D printing turns library users into industrial designers

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Last year, the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library added 3D printing to the technology they provide to library users. 3D printing lets designers rapidly turn their ideas into plastic prototypes. Engineering students from the College of Agriculture are using the AgVet library’s 3D printer to test their design ideas.

The library’s IT technologist, Richie Sexton, spearheaded the project to offer 3D printing. A story in today’s Knoxzine features Richie explaining the operation and benefits of 3D printing. Check it out.

[Here are guidelines for 3D printing at the Pendergrass Library.]




UT Library Council honors work on master agreements

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Blake Reagan, Micheline Westfall, Corey Halaychik

The University of Tennessee Library Council recently honored three UT staff members for working to streamline the purchase of library materials across UT campuses. Not long ago, Corey Halaychik, Blake Reagan, and Micheline Westfall finalized the one-hundredth “master agreement” with a library vendor.

The UT libraries typically negotiate hundreds of licensing agreements each year with publishers of books, journals, and electronic resources. Many of those agreements are with the same group of publishers, yet each contract must be scrutinized annually by each campus for compliance with state laws and university policies. A master agreement, governing all subsequent purchases from a participating vendor, can eliminate costly hours of contract review and significantly speed up the purchase of library materials.

Over the past year, Halaychik and Westfall, both faculty members in UT Knoxville Libraries’ Licensing, E-Resources, and Serials Department, worked in close collaboration with Reagan, director of Contracts Administration for the University of Tennessee System, to negotiate a series of master agreements with library vendors. The agreements benefit all schools in the UT System and allow each UT library to bypass the yearly contract review process for new and renewed subscriptions. The libraries can now order books, journals, and electronic resources from participating vendors through a simple purchase order. On the Knoxville campus, the library has reduced the number of its vendor contracts by more than half.

In a ceremony on June 4, Sandy Oelschlegel, chair of the UT Library Council and director of UT’s Preston Medical Library, presented a “Resolution of Thanks” to Halaychik, Reagan, and Westfall for their “outstanding service and meaningful contributions to the University of Tennessee libraries and their patrons through the successful negotiation of past and future master agreements.”




UT Libraries Acquires Two Historically Significant First Editions

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Two historically important books, acquired by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have been added to the library’s special collections.

Phillis Wheatley was an enslaved person in the household of a prosperous Boston family. Her Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (published 1773) was the first published book by an African-American woman.

Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk* (published 1833) was transcribed and translated into English from the testimony of the Sauk chief who waged war on the United States in 1832. Black Hawk’s Life was one of the first Native American autobiographies published in the United States.

The UT Libraries recently purchased rare first editions of both works. The copy of Wheatley’s Poems is a particularly noteworthy specimen. It contains an extremely rare inscription by the poet herself.

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Frontispiece to Phillis Wheatley’s Poems

Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784) was a child of approximately seven years old when she was captured by slavers in west Africa, transported to America, and sold at auction in the slave market of Boston, Massachusetts, to John and Susanna Wheatley. John Wheatley gave her the name of the slave ship, the Phillis, aboard which she had made the grueling Atlantic crossing.

The Wheatley family began tutoring Phillis in English, Latin, and the Bible, and the young slave quickly displayed a facility for learning.

The verses in Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral are filled with classical allusions. Many are elegies to the great men of the day. Her elegy on the death of the popular preacher George Whitefield, published in Boston, Philadelphia, New York, and London when Wheatley was just 17 years old, gained her considerable notoriety. Susanna Wheatley tried to capitalize on her servant’s success to publish the verses but was unable to secure sufficient subscriptions to underwrite the cost of publication in the American colonies.

In the eighteenth century, the intellectual and creative capabilities of Africans were a subject of debate, and the reading public was skeptical of a literary work attributed to a slave. In 1772 Phillis Wheatley was called before a group of Boston’s leading citizens to defend the authenticity of her work.

The august body was convinced of her authorship. The Poems were printed in London and widely acclaimed. Wheatley was feted on two continents and met many notables, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin.

Wheatley was emancipated from slavery in 1773, but her life as a free woman was brief and fraught. She died in childbirth in 1784 at the age of 31.

The 1773 edition of Phillis Wheatley’s poems purchased by the UT Libraries, sadly, is missing the original frontispiece, a rare depiction of an individual female slave — a pensive Wheatley at work on a poem.

Wheatley’s slender volume of poetry, a signal literary achievement by an enslaved African, influenced the discourse on slavery in America.

Black Hawk’s recounting of his life and the Sauk insurrection influenced another debate, over the rights of America’s indigenous peoples.

White settlers began encroaching upon the Sauk nation’s ancestral homelands in the early decades of the nineteenth century, challenging the Sauk’s sovereign right to their land. The Sauk and other tribes living east of the Mississippi River were pushed to lands west of the river.

Chief Black Hawk (1767-1838) and other members of the Sauk questioned the validity of the treaty ostensibly ceding their lands. In 1832, Black Hawk and a group of several hundred men, women, and children attempted to resettle on tribal lands.

Whatever Black Hawk’s intentions, United States officials were convinced that his band was hostile. When Black Hawk sent a peace delegation to meet the approaching army, the three warriors waving a white flag were fired upon. Thus began the brief encounter known as the Black Hawk War. During ensuing skirmishes, Black Hawk’s small band gained several successes before a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Bad Axe. Black Hawk escaped capture at Bad Axe but later surrendered.

Transferred to Fort Monroe in Virginia, Black Hawk and other imprisoned leaders of the uprising were paraded in public — not as reviled enemies but as celebrities. Along the eastern seaboard, far from frontier hostilities, the romanticizing of the “noble savage” was already underway. The prisoners posed for portraits, toured Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York City, and even met briefly with President Andrew Jackson.

After a few months, Black Hawk and the other leaders were released. Black Hawk’s autobiography, dictated to a government interpreter, was published in 1833. It became an instant bestseller, going through five printings within a year.

The Black Hawk first edition also is a scarce treasure.

Katy Chiles, the UT professor who brought the item to the Libraries’ attention, appreciates the cultural significance and research value of both first editions. Her research on early American literatures and print culture studies involves looking at early editions of rare texts and analyzing how each different publication presented itself to readers in different and important ways. “In my work on Black Hawks’ Life, I am investigating how American publishers produced frontispieces, prefaces, and book bindings for the text’s earliest publications to influence the meaning of the War of 1812, the 1832 Black Hawk War, and, more broadly, British, U.S., and Indian relations,” Chiles told librarians when recommending the acquisition. “I also analyze the differences between texts, such as prefaces and frontispieces that play an important role in how ‘the Indian’ is represented. Access to first editions is key to enabling this kind of analysis. Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk is a crucially important book in understanding and appreciating what indigenous peoples have done with print.” Chiles teaches African-American, Native American, and early American literature in the UT Department of English.

Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral and Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk are now available to scholars of American history and literature in the UT Libraries’ Special Collections. The acquisitions complement the UT Libraries’ excellent holdings of early American imprints.

* Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk, embracing the tradition of his nation — Indian wars in which he has been engaged — cause of joining the British in their late war with America, and its history — description of the Rock-River village — manners and customs — encroachments by the whites, contrary to treaty — removal from his village in 1831. With an account of the cause and general history of the late war, his surrender and confinement at Jefferson barracks, and travels through the United States.




Re-carpeting throughout Hodges Library

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Re-carpeting on all floors of Hodges Library will begin following final exams and will continue through June.

New carpet will be installed on the ground floor, first floor (including the auditorium), and all stacks floors (floors 3-6). Carpets in faculty studies and beneath graduate carrels also will be replaced.

Small areas within the stacks may be temporarily inaccessible. And access to individual faculty studies may be blocked for brief periods.

If you are unable to access needed materials, please ask for help at the circulation/information desk near the Melrose Avenue entrance.

UT students, faculty, and staff can obtain books from closed areas by using the “Request” link in the library catalog. (Read “How it works” at lib.utk.edu/request/library-express.)

The Libraries will make every effort to assure that the process is as unobtrusive as possible. We apologize for any inconvenience.