During final exams: longer hours and “de-stress” activities

During finals, campus libraries will be open additional hours and will offer activities to help students “de-stress.” De-Stress For Success activities are sponsored by the UT Libraries, UT Graduate Student Senate, UT’s Thornton Athletics Student Life Center, and Threds.

tie-dye 11x17EXTENDED HOURS

Hodges Library:
All floors of Hodges Library will be open continuously from noon, Sunday, April 27, until midnight on Tuesday, May 6.

Pendergrass Agriculture & Veterinary Medicine Library:
Mon., April 28 – Thurs., May 1 — 7:30 am – midnight
Fri., May 2 — 7:30 am – 8 pm
Sat., May 3 — 9 am – 8 pm
Sun., May 4 — noon – midnight
Mon., May 5 — 7:30 am – midnight
Tues., May 6 — 7:30 am – 6 pm

George F. DeVine Music Library:
Sat., April 26 — 10 am – 7 pm
Sun., April 27 — 2 pm – 11 pm
Mon., April 28 – Thurs., May 1 — 8 am – 11 pm
Fri., May 2 — 8 am – 5 pm
Sat., May 3 — 10 am – 7 pm
Sun., May 4 — 2 pm – 11 pm
Mon., May 5 — 8 am – 11 pm
Tues., May 6 — 8 am – 6 pm

DE-STRESS FOR SUCCESS

***New de-stress activity this semester: Tie-Die workshop at the Presidential Courtyard, Monday, April 28, from 11 am to 2 pm***

photobooth-0
Watch for our super-fun photo booth!

The Hodges and Pendergrass libraries will host a number of activities to help students who are feeling overwhelmed by final exams. Both Hodges Library and Pendergrass Agriculture & Veterinary Medicine Library will have HABIT (Human Animal Bond in Tennessee) therapy dogs on hand during finals week.

Student Health Center staff will visit Hodges Library to offer “Well-Being Tips” for managing stress and maintaining positive mental health. SAIS (Student Assessment of Instruction System) will hand out popsicles for an energy boost on Study Day. Ongoing activities include games, cartoons, and coloring books in Room 251, Hodges Library. And watch for our free Photo Booth in Hodges Library, 2-4 pm, on April 30 and May 1.

Pendergrass AgVetMed Library will offer snacks, board games, jigsaw puzzles, crafts, and some outside activities like corn hole toss.

Here’s the full schedule:

De-Stress Calendar3

Research hint: Grab the formatted citation

Citing references in your research paper? The easiest way to format a citation in the prescribed style may be to grab the citation from the Libraries’ catalog. If UT owns the item and there’s a record in the catalog, you can access a formatted citation from the brief record display (results from using the search box on the Libraries’ homepage).

Click the Details tab under the item’s brief record. Choose “Citation” from the Actions dropdown menu in the upper right of the Details box. Formatting options include the American Psychological Association, Modern Language Association, and Chicago/Turabian styles.

ActionsDropdown

styles

To format journal article citations, use a citation management tool like Zotero or EndNote.
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This new feature is part of our ongoing efforts to improve our library systems.

Want more helpful hints for your library research? Visit the research assistance desk in 209 Hodges Library, at the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library, or the Music Library.

Student Winners of Graduate Writing Awards to Read, April 14

The University of Tennessee’s final Writers in the Library event of the academic year will feature readings by student winners of the John C. Hodges Graduate Writing Awards. Readings from the winning works will take place in the Hodges Library auditorium on Monday, April 14, at 7:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Awards are made possible by the English Department through the John C. Hodges Better English Fund, endowed by the long-time UT English professor and author of the Harbrace College Handbook, for whom the Hodges Library also is named.

2014 winners of the John C. Hodges Graduate Writing Awards:

FICTION


First Prize: Genna Gazelka, for “As Chickadees Fall”
Second Prize: Michael Shou-Yung Shum, for “The Disappearance of Herman Grimes”
Third Prize: Katherine Ann Davis, “My Collector,” novel excerpt
Honorable Mention: Richard Hermes, “The Rubber Tapper’s Knife”

POETRY


First Prize: Jake Ward, for “Lucy Goes to the Hospital and never returns”
Second Prize: Ben McClendon, for “Habitat for Humanity” and other poems
Third Prize: Christian Anton Gerard, for “The Poet Thinking He’s Milton’s Adam,” and other poems

Honorable mentions:
Stephanie Dugger, for “Mid-August Meteor Shower, Vedauwoo, WY,” and other poems
Jonathan Brehm, for “I’m a Pigeon,” and other poems
Andrew Dillon, for “Viscosity” and other poems

First, second, and third place winners will read at the April 14 Writers in the Library event. Winners receive $500 for First Prize, $300 for Second Prize, and $100 for Third Prize in each category. This year’s judges were Dr. Martin Griffin for fiction and Dr. Kristi Maxwell for poetry.

The public is invited to join the university community for readings by these accomplished, up-and-coming writers.
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the University of Tennessee Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@utk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@utk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters

Comprehensive Bibliography of the Smokies Now Available

TerraThe culmination of fifteen years of research, Terra Incognita: An Annotated Bibliography of the Great Smoky Mountains, 1544-1934 is the most comprehensive bibliography of sources related to the Great Smoky Mountains ever created. The book is now available for purchase from the University of Tennessee Press.

Terra Incognita catalogs printed material on the Great Smoky Mountains from the earliest map documenting the De Soto expedition in the 16th century to writings that were instrumental in the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each chapter, introduced by a substantive essay, details published works on a different aspect of the history, peoples, culture, and natural history of the Smokies region. There are chapters, for instance, on the Cherokee, early explorers, music, mountain life, and the national park movement.

The authoritative and meticulously researched work is an indispensable reference for scholars and students studying any aspect of the region’s past. According to author and historian Jim Casada, “Terra Incognita belongs in every academic library in the country and locals who simply cherish the Smokies will want to have it on their shelves.”

The title for the bibliography comes from a remark by Horace Kephart, an early twentieth-century chronicler of mountain culture and an important force behind the founding of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Researching the region prior to his first visit in 1904, Kephart found the Great Smoky Mountains to be a “terra incognita.” Little to nothing, it seemed, could be found in libraries to elucidate the land or its people. This new bibliography rectifies that omission by bringing together the scattered and obscure early accounts of the Smokies. (Kephart is the only individual to merit a separate chapter in Terra Incognita.)

Terra Incognita was compiled and edited by three librarians. Anne Bridges and Ken Wise are associate professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries and co-directors of the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project (www.lib.utk.edu/smokies). Russell Clement, emeritus faculty at Northwestern University, worked for many years in academic libraries, most recently as head of the art collection at Northwestern.

An online database, Database of the Smokies (dots.lib.utk.edu), updates Terra Incognita with citations to material published since 1934, the date the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established.

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Contact:

Anne Bridges, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-0017, abridges@utk.edu)

Ken Wise, UT Knoxville Libraries (865-974-2359, kwise@utk.edu)

Ordering information: http://utpress.org

Information Is Our Game: Meet Steven Milewski

MilewskiCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As Digital Media Technologies Librarian, Steven Milewski is our expert on streaming collections and technologies. With Steven’s guidance, the UT Libraries is building a collection of streamed media to support teaching and research. Steven is in charge of selecting video content, digitizing existing media holdings, and acquiring rights to streamed media, as well as maintaining the infrastructure that allows faculty and students to view streamed video from any computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

He can help library users extract video clips for use in presentations and help instructors embed videos in their class’s Blackboard site. Explore Steven’s online guide to finding and using streamed content relevant to your discipline at libguides.utk.edu/streaming.

Steven is the subject librarian for Social Work, providing information literacy instruction, research consultations, and collection development for that college. He also serves as the Libraries’ liaison to the UT Office of Disability Services. Over the past year, he has purchased new adaptive equipment and software for the library.

Steven holds a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s in information science from UT.

Information Is Our Game: Meet Allison Sharp

SharpCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As a member of the Libraries’ Learning, Research, and Engagement team, Allison Sharp focuses much of her time on library instruction, programming activities, and services that contribute to student success.

Allison enjoys teaching research skills in the conventional classroom setting, but she is equally enthusiastic about programs, such as DeStress for Success, that chiefly aim to engage students in the college experience. She is motivated by the desire to help students feel comfortable and competent as library users and researchers at the University of Tennessee.

Allison connects well with students from diverse backgrounds. She has developed strong relationships with international programs at the university and has proven herself to be an invaluable instructor and mentor to international students.

As librarian for the Africana Studies Program and the School of Information Sciences, she provides research assistance, instruction, and collection development for those disciplines.

Allison holds a bachelor’s in psychology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and a master’s in library and information science from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. She is pursuing a PhD in communication and information at UT.

Information Is Our Game: Meet Holly Mercer

MercerCard

    BIG IDEAS demand reliable information. The University Libraries supports scholarship, research, and learning at UT by acquiring, organizing, preserving, and facilitating access to the world’s knowledge. The wide-ranging expertise of our librarians might surprise you.

    This semester we begin a series of profiles of UT Knoxville librarians. Watch for a new profile each week.

As Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Research Services, Holly Mercer directs the Libraries’ services to scholars. She oversees digital initiatives; research and grants; data curation; digital publishing and production; digital humanities; and the Libraries’ department of learning, research, and engagement.

Digital technologies have transformed academic libraries. New modes of inquiry and dissemination of scholarship engage librarians in the research process from creation to preservation. Under Holly’s leadership, librarians help researchers take advantage of emerging technologies to model, publish, and preserve their research.

Holly’s division offers support for open access publishing and helps scholars meet the data management requirements of granting agencies. Her group manages Trace, UT’s showcase and archive of creative and scholarly work, as well as a digital imprint, Newfound Press, that publishes peer-reviewed books and multimedia works.

Over the past year, Holly spearheaded UT’s membership in the Library Publishing Coalition and HathiTrust. The Library Publishing Coalition addresses changes in scholarly publishing that impact academic libraries. HathiTrust is a partnership of major academic and research libraries collaborating in a digital library initiative to preserve and provide access to the published record in digital form. Joining HathiTrust immediately secured online access for UT users to more than 3.4 million volumes in the public domain.

Holly holds a master’s in library and information science from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor’s degree in classical studies from Duke University. She currently serves on committees of several projects of national and international scope, including DataONE and the Library Publishing Coalition.

UT Hosts Second Annual STEM Symposium for High School Students March 29

KNOXVILLE — Tennessee high school students interested in careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics are invited to a symposium sponsored by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Libraries on Saturday, March 29.

The second annual Big Orange STEM Symposium (BOSS): High School Outreach will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the John C. Hodges Library.

The symposium is free, but participants are encouraged to register at https://tiny.utk.edu/boss.

The registration deadline is Thursday, March 27. Free lunch and goody bags will be provided for participants who register before March 21.

The symposium brings together STEM-related departments and centers from across the UT campus and area organizations to provide high school students with a learning experience that includes guidance in career exploration and planning from a UT Career Services counselor. The symposium will give students a taste of each of the disciplines so they will be better prepared to decide which area they would like to study.

Two panel discussions — one featuring current undergraduate students and another with STEM professors — will offer insights into the university experience and how to succeed in STEM studies. Students also will be able to meet researchers working in STEM fields. In breakout sessions, they will learn about strategies and techniques for doing undergraduate research through exposure to the scientific process, resources and technologies. There will also be a STEM fair where participants can learn about STEM organizations in the region and opportunities at UT.

The symposium will feature representatives from the Knoxville community including Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Texas Instruments, Biology in a Box and Dade Moeller. The UT departments of Mathematics, Soil Science, Geography and Chemistry also will participate.

For more information about the symposium, visit https://tiny.utk.edu/boss.

CONTACT:

Ingrid Ruffin (865-974-3513, iruffin@utk.edu)

EndNote classes, March 4 & 13: manage your references

Want to get control of your citations? Consider attending a hands-on class to learn how to use EndNote, a citation management tool. The following EndNote classes are open to UT students, faculty, and staff.

Collaborating with EndNote and EndNote Online
Tuesday, March 4

2:00-3:00 p.m.
211 Hodges Library
Register by sending a message to endnote@utk.edu.
Learn how to use EndNote collaboratively. Share references and combine manuscript drafts, using either EndNote desktop ro EndNote Online. Presumes basic familiarity with EndNote desktop version.

Introduction to Endnote
Thursday, March 13

3:30-5:00 p.m.
211 Hodges Library
Register by sending a message to endnote@utk.edu.
Discover how you can capture and organize citations from database searches, attach full-text PDFs, and insert citations formatted in the style of your choice into Microsoft Word documents.

Some instruction is helpful to master EndNote basic features. More help is available in our library research guide (http://libguides.utk.edu/endnote) and through webinars (http://endnote.com/training).

EndNote is free to students, faculty, and staff.* Download EndNote at http://libguides.utk.edu/endnote.

To arrange class instruction for a group of seven or more people, email endnote@utk.edu.

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*EndNote is provided by a license from the Office of Information Technology to UT Knoxville, UT Memphis, and UT Space Institute.

Libraries will host STEM symposium for high school students, March 29

The University of Tennessee Libraries is hosting the second annual Big Orange STEM Symposium (B.O.S.S.): High School Outreach, Saturday, March 29, 2014, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the John C. Hodges Library on the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, campus.

The symposium is aimed at high school students who are interested in careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. High school students at all levels are invited to participate.

The symposium brings together STEM-related departments and centers from across the UT Knoxville campus and the Knoxville community to provide high school students with a learning experience that includes guidance in career exploration and planning from a UT Career Services counselor. The symposium will allow students to explore STEM fields in a holistic way, giving them a taste of various disciplines so they will be more informed and better prepared to decide which area they would like to study.

Two panel discussions — one featuring current undergraduate students and another with STEM professors — will offer insights into the university experience and how to succeed in STEM studies. Students also will have the opportunity to meet researchers working in STEM fields. In breakout sessions, they will learn about strategies and techniques for doing undergraduate research through exposure to the scientific process, resources, and technologies. At a STEM Fair, they can learn about STEM organizations in our region and unique opportunities at UT Knoxville.

Representatives from the Knoxville community include Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Texas Instruments, Biology in a Box, and Dade Moeller. The UT departments of math, soil science, geography, chemistry, and medicine also will participate.

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For more information about the symposium and registration, please visit the website at http://s.lib.utk.edu/boss2014. Free lunch and goody bags will be provided for attendees who register before March 21, 2014. On-site registration will be available.