Celebrate the Day of the Dead, Oct. 31

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Representations of Catrina, one of the most popular figures of the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico. (©Tomas Castelazo, www.tomascastelazo.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Stop by the Hodges Library (1st floor galleria) and vote for your favorite traditional ofrenda (altars honoring the deceased) created by students from the Second-Year Spanish Program. The Alter Exhibit and Competition will be on view from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

A festival of films, music videos, and documentaries related to the Day of the Dead will run throughout the day in the Hodges Library auditorium.

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday observed throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a bank holiday. The celebration takes place on October 31, November 1 and November 2, in connection with the triduum of Allhallowtide: All Hallows’ Eve, Hallowmas, and All Souls’ Day. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Day_of_the_Dead
,
accessed 14 October 2014]

 

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Visit the Second-Year Spanish Program’s webpage

 

 

 




“Student Art in the Library” winners

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Winners Santiago Ortiz-Piazuelo, BJ Alumbaugh, Georganna Greene, and Dean of Libraries Steve Smith

Winners Santiago Ortiz-Piazuelo, BJ Alumbaugh, Georganna Greene, and Dean of Libraries Steve Smith

Winners of the Student Art in the Library juried exhibition have been announced. The UT Libraries has been holding Student Art in the Library contests since 2005. The contest is open to UT students in all disciplines, and is judged by a committee of library staff. First-, second-, and third-place winners are awarded cash prizes. This semester the committee received 102 entries from 40 artists. A number of the contributing artists were present for the unveiling on October 13.

Exhibiting artists this semester are: BJ Alumbaugh, Mark Bender, Molly Casey, Peter Cotroneo, Bryan Davis, Melisa Donahue, Clinton Elmore, Marta Goebel-Pietrasz, Georganna Greene, Chet Guthrie, Rachel Hankins, Dan Hood, Alex Kramb, Youn Ji Lee, Margaret McGregor, Carolina Moralejo, Santiago Ortiz-Piazuelo, Avery Quillen, Rachel Welsh

And the winners are:
Alumbaugh
First Place:
BJ Alumbaugh
“ATF Alpha Blox: Demonoid”
Letterpress print composed from a modular lead typeface


BullsEye
Second Place:
Santiago Ortiz-Piazuelo
“Bull’s Eye”
Woodcut print


coldThird Place:
Georganna Greene
“Cold”
Oil painting


Artworks will remain on display in 135 Hodges Library throughout the fall semester. View a retrospective of previous Student Art in the Library exhibitions at trace.tennessee.edu/utk_libsart. Read more about the Libraries’ art competition and at lib.utk.edu/artinlibrary.




National Day on Writing, Oct. 20

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GraffitiWalkJoin the UT Libraries and The Writing Center to celebrate the National Day on Writing, Monday, October 20, noon to 2:00 in the Hodges Library Commons.

Add your comments to the Graffiti Walk and pick up copies of student publications such as Pursuit: The Journal of Undergraduate Research.

The National Day on Writing draws attention to the remarkable variety of writing we engage in. People in every walk of life, in every kind of work, and at every age write more than ever before for personal, professional, and civic purposes. Furthermore, new technologies expand the possibilities for composing in multiple media and for speaking to wider audiences than ever before and at a faster pace than ever before in our history.

Celebrate with us and demonstrate your facility with the quip, the pun, or the bon mot at our Graffiti Walk.




Celebrate Open Access Week, Oct. 20-26

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OAlogo

Open-access literature is digital, online, and free of charge.

University students and faculty can have a role in making research and scholarship freely accessible to all.

Choosing to publish in open-access journals can help. Tax dollars and college tuition pay for much of the research reported in academic journals. But the soaring costs of commercially published academic journals can bar faculty and student access to research and scholarship.

Learn about open-access journals, open textbooks, open data, and open-access digital repositories.

Join Open Access Week events in Hodges Library:

Kickoff Watch Party: “Generation Open”
Mon., Oct. 20, 3:00-4:00 pm, 220E Practice Presentation Rm.

    A live, streamed event will discuss the importance of students and early career researchers in the transition to open access, and will explore how changes in scholarly publishing affect scholars and researchers at different stages of their careers. Sponsored by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and the World Bank.

Talk: Tim Errington, project manager for the Center for Open Science
Thurs., Oct. 23, 1:30-3:00 pm, 213 Hodges Library

Tim Errington will discuss challenges to increasing open science practices and tell us how the SHARE notification system aims to make research assets more discoverable and more accessible.

Trace 5th Anniversary Celebration
Thurs., Oct. 23, 3:00-4:00 pm, Mary Greer Rm. (258)

Celebrate five years of Trace, the Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange. The Trace digital repository boasts 25,000+ items in 900+ disciplines and more than 3.3 million downloads. Join us for CAKE!




National Book Award nominee Elizabeth McCracken to read October 22

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McCrackenElizabeth McCracken will read from her latest short story collection, Thunderstruck & Other Stories, at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Wednesday, October 22, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

McCracken is the author of five books, most recently Thunderstruck, currently on the long list for the 2014 National Book Award in fiction. Her other books include National Book Award finalist The Giant’s House and New York Times Book Review Notable Books An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination and Niagara Falls All Over Again. McCracken is currently James A. Michener Chair of Creative Writing at the University of Texas at Austin.

Thunderstruck is a collection of nine stories featuring a variety of eclectic characters, including a girl ghost, the human musical saw, and two three-legged dogs, among others. Publishers Weekly heralded the work as “mesmerizing and strange,” and commented that McCracken “transforms life’s dead ends into transformational visions.”

In addition to the reading, the author will participate in a Q&A discussion about her work at 3 p.m. in 1210 McClung Tower on October 22. The discussion is open to all UT students and faculty.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

Christopher Hebert, the UT Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, emcees Writers in the Library events. Hebert and Marilyn Kallet, director of the UT Creative Writing Program, have lined up an exceptional group of authors to read in the 2014–2015 academic year. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@utk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@utk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Workshop: NVivo and EndNote

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NVivo and EndNote
October 20, 2014
3:30-5:00 pm
Room 211, Hodges Library

Register at workshop.utk.edu

This course will teach users how to combine NVivo 10 and EndNote to interface citations with research. Bibliographic data, including full-text articles, can be found and archived in EndNote and then transferred to NVivo for analysis. Most researchers use a bibliographic program to organize references and for the ‘Cite while you write’ function. Learning to use NVivo along with Endnote will allow you to add notes or annotations to your bibliographic database as you review your references. If you have added notes (or other material), NVivo can help you write a review of the literature in a particular area of research, or help you conduct an analysis of the literature (or other documentary sources) pertaining to a particular area of research.
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Taught by Rochelle Butler, Qualitative Research Consultant, OIT Research Computing Support, and Jeanine Williamson, engineering librarian.




New Streaming Movie Option!

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Alien Movie PosterIn addition to our popular Residence Life Cinema, we have added Criterion-On-Demand USA to our suite of streaming services. Criterion-On-Demand USA has a collection of over 600 films available at all times.

Films from this service are available off campus, and can even be downloaded to a computer for 48 hours.  Off campus users will be asked for their Net ID and password (just like some of the databases do when accessing off campus). This service requires a download of “Criterion Silverlight Player”, which most of you have already downloaded. Films can be streamed with or without subtitles, and they can be watched individually but cannot be shown at group events.

Criterion-On-Demand USA offers films from 20th Century Fox, Paramount Pictures, Dreamworks SKG, MTV Films, Open Road Films, Fox Searchlight, and some additional smaller studios. New films are added quarterly. Please note that this is not the Criterion Collection of remade classic films and art films. You can begin watching anytime at the following URL:  http://s.lib.utk.edu/criterion




“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms” Natural History Illustration Exhibit at McClung Museum

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BBB_Banner_p815A new exhibit exploring natural history illustration from the 1500s to the 1800s opens Friday, September 12, at UT’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture. Some of the rare books on display are on loan from the University Libraries’ Special Collections. Special Collections items include works of zoological and botanical illustration, notably a 1665 imprint of the historic Micrographia, by Robert Hooke.

“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms: Natural History Illustration from the 1500s–1800s” will run through January 4, 2015, and explores over 300 years of the intersection of science and art in natural history illustration.

More than fifty rare books, prints, and objects are on view, highlighting how increasing access to books, travel, and technology, as well as the evolution of knowledge, changed the way in which illustrations were created and interpreted. From fantastical images of beasts in the 1500s, to extremely accurate depictions of plants and animals in the 1800s, the illustrations in the exhibit demonstrate the rapid advances of natural history during the print age.

Several exhibit-related programs are planned. Free family programming includes exhibit-related Family Fun Days on September 27 and November 1, and a Stroller Tour for parents, caregivers and young children on October 6.

Other programming includes a natural history illustration workshop, “Using Scratchboard to Create Lifelike Illustrations” on October 5, and lectures on natural history and illustration by Barney Lipscomb, Leonhardt Chair of Botany at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas, on October 22, and UT Professor of History Denise Phillips on November 6.

See the exhibit page for more programming details: http://tiny.utk.edu/birdsbugsblooms.

“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms” is curated by Catherine Shteynberg and Christine Dano Johnson. Lenders include Arader Galleries, Dr. Gordon Burghardt, the National Museum of Health and Medicine, and UT Special Collections. The exhibit is presented by Arader Galleries, W. Graham Arader III, UT Federal Credit Union, the Ready for the World Initiative, ARAMARK, Bennett Galleries, and the Ardath & Joel E. Rynning Museum Fund. Additional support is provided by Knox County, the City of Knoxville, and the Arts & Heritage Fund.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on the weekdays. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.

Additional parking information is available at http://mcclungmuseum.utk.edu/visit/parking.

For more information about the McClung Museum and its collections and exhibits, visit http://mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.




3D printing turns library users into industrial designers

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Last year, the Pendergrass Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library added 3D printing to the technology they provide to library users. 3D printing lets designers rapidly turn their ideas into plastic prototypes. Engineering students from the College of Agriculture are using the AgVet library’s 3D printer to test their design ideas.

The library’s IT technologist, Richie Sexton, spearheaded the project to offer 3D printing. A story in today’s Knoxzine features Richie explaining the operation and benefits of 3D printing. Check it out.

[Here are guidelines for 3D printing at the Pendergrass Library.]




UT Library Council honors work on master agreements

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Blake Reagan, Micheline Westfall, Corey Halaychik

The University of Tennessee Library Council recently honored three UT staff members for working to streamline the purchase of library materials across UT campuses. Not long ago, Corey Halaychik, Blake Reagan, and Micheline Westfall finalized the one-hundredth “master agreement” with a library vendor.

The UT libraries typically negotiate hundreds of licensing agreements each year with publishers of books, journals, and electronic resources. Many of those agreements are with the same group of publishers, yet each contract must be scrutinized annually by each campus for compliance with state laws and university policies. A master agreement, governing all subsequent purchases from a participating vendor, can eliminate costly hours of contract review and significantly speed up the purchase of library materials.

Over the past year, Halaychik and Westfall, both faculty members in UT Knoxville Libraries’ Licensing, E-Resources, and Serials Department, worked in close collaboration with Reagan, director of Contracts Administration for the University of Tennessee System, to negotiate a series of master agreements with library vendors. The agreements benefit all schools in the UT System and allow each UT library to bypass the yearly contract review process for new and renewed subscriptions. The libraries can now order books, journals, and electronic resources from participating vendors through a simple purchase order. On the Knoxville campus, the library has reduced the number of its vendor contracts by more than half.

In a ceremony on June 4, Sandy Oelschlegel, chair of the UT Library Council and director of UT’s Preston Medical Library, presented a “Resolution of Thanks” to Halaychik, Reagan, and Westfall for their “outstanding service and meaningful contributions to the University of Tennessee libraries and their patrons through the successful negotiation of past and future master agreements.”