Public Invited to Hear Anthropologist Bill Bass, Oct. 30

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BillBass2Over his fifty-year career as an anthropologist, University of Tennessee Professor Emeritus William M. Bass excavated ancient skeletons and recovered the remains of murder victims. He also headed UT’s anthropology department for more than 20 years and trained many of the nation’s current leading forensic anthropologists.

The University of Tennessee Libraries, which holds the research and teaching materials documenting his illustrious career, will honor Bass and celebrate the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection at an upcoming event. The public is invited to a lecture by Bass and a reception in his honor on Thursday, October 30, at UT’s John C. Hodges Library.

A reception in the Jack E. Reese Galleria begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by the lecture in the Lindsay Young Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Guests also may visit Special Collections to view items from the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.

PrintBass is perhaps best known to the general public as the creator of the “Body Farm” — officially the Anthropology Research Center. The Body Farm was the world’s first laboratory for researching the processes and timetable of decomposition of human remains.

Bass has recounted the story of the Body Farm to many audiences. His talk at the UT library will be something different. He will focus on his more traditional pursuits in the field of anthropology, including excavating human skeletal remains in the Great Plains in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution. His field study notebooks from these excavations are among the materials Bass donated to the UT Libraries to create the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.





Keith Flynn and Joyce Jenkins at “Writers in the Library,” Oct. 27

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FlynnJenkinsPoets Keith Flynn and Joyce Jenkins will read from their works at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Monday, October 27, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Keith Flynn is the founder and editor of The Asheville Poetry Review, as well as the author of seven books, including five collections of poetry, most recently Colony Collapse Disorder (Wings Press, 2013). His essays on poetry are collected in The Rhythm Method, Razzmatazz and Memory: How To Make Your Poetry Swing (Writer’s Digest Books, 2007). From 1984 to 1999, he was lyricist and lead singer for The Crystal Zoo; currently he tours with a combo, The Holy Men. He has been awarded the Sandburg Prize for poetry, the ASCAP Emerging Songwriter Prize, the Paumanok Poetry Award, and the 2013 NC Literary Fellowship, and was twice named the Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for North Carolina.

Joyce Jenkins is editor and Executive Director of Poetry Flash, California’s iconic online Literary Review and Calendar for the West (poetryflash.org), founded in 1972. Joyce began working with the magazine in 1978. Poetry Flash presents the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival, Northern California Book Awards, and Poetry Flash Reading Series. She is the author of Portal, a chapbook with an introduction by Carolyn Kizer, and Joy Road, and has read her poetry in the Bay Area and across the country. She received the AAUW Ruth Murray Jones Publishing Award in 1991, American Book Award in 1994, National Poetry Association’s 1995 Award for Distinguished Service, and the 2006 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award for Lifetime Achievement. On behalf of Poetry Flash, she received Litquake’s 2012 Barbary Coast Award. June 6, 2009 was named “Joyce Jenkins Day” by the City of Berkeley in honor of the Berkeley Poetry Festival lifetime achievement award.

At noon, the same day, Katherine Ann Davis, editor of UT’s Grist: The Journal for Writers, will join Flynn and Jenkins for an Editors’ Roundtable at 1210-1211 McClung Tower. They will discuss what editors are looking for when they read submissions — a great networking opportunity for writers who are trying to get published. Refreshments will be served.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a schedule of readings for the 2014-2015 academic year.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@utk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@utk.edu).

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Celebrate the Day of the Dead, Oct. 31

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Representations of Catrina, one of the most popular figures of the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico. (©Tomas Castelazo, www.tomascastelazo.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Stop by the Hodges Library (1st floor galleria) and vote for your favorite traditional ofrenda (altars honoring the deceased) created by students from the Second-Year Spanish Program. The Alter Exhibit and Competition will be on view from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

A festival of films, music videos, and documentaries related to the Day of the Dead will run throughout the day in the Hodges Library auditorium.

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday observed throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a bank holiday. The celebration takes place on October 31, November 1 and November 2, in connection with the triduum of Allhallowtide: All Hallows’ Eve, Hallowmas, and All Souls’ Day. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Day_of_the_Dead
,
accessed 14 October 2014]

 

celebracion

 

 

 

Visit the Second-Year Spanish Program’s webpage

 

 

 




National Day on Writing, Oct. 20

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GraffitiWalkJoin the UT Libraries and The Writing Center to celebrate the National Day on Writing, Monday, October 20, noon to 2:00 in the Hodges Library Commons.

Add your comments to the Graffiti Walk and pick up copies of student publications such as Pursuit: The Journal of Undergraduate Research.

The National Day on Writing draws attention to the remarkable variety of writing we engage in. People in every walk of life, in every kind of work, and at every age write more than ever before for personal, professional, and civic purposes. Furthermore, new technologies expand the possibilities for composing in multiple media and for speaking to wider audiences than ever before and at a faster pace than ever before in our history.

Celebrate with us and demonstrate your facility with the quip, the pun, or the bon mot at our Graffiti Walk.




Celebrate Open Access Week, Oct. 20-26

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OAlogo

Open-access literature is digital, online, and free of charge.

University students and faculty can have a role in making research and scholarship freely accessible to all.

Choosing to publish in open-access journals can help. Tax dollars and college tuition pay for much of the research reported in academic journals. But the soaring costs of commercially published academic journals can bar faculty and student access to research and scholarship.

Learn about open-access journals, open textbooks, open data, and open-access digital repositories.

Join Open Access Week events in Hodges Library:

Kickoff Watch Party: “Generation Open”
Mon., Oct. 20, 3:00-4:00 pm, 220E Practice Presentation Rm.

    A live, streamed event will discuss the importance of students and early career researchers in the transition to open access, and will explore how changes in scholarly publishing affect scholars and researchers at different stages of their careers. Sponsored by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and the World Bank.

Talk: Tim Errington, project manager for the Center for Open Science
Thurs., Oct. 23, 1:30-3:00 pm, 213 Hodges Library

Tim Errington will discuss challenges to increasing open science practices and tell us how the SHARE notification system aims to make research assets more discoverable and more accessible.

Trace 5th Anniversary Celebration
Thurs., Oct. 23, 3:00-4:00 pm, Mary Greer Rm. (258)

Celebrate five years of Trace, the Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange. The Trace digital repository boasts 25,000+ items in 900+ disciplines and more than 3.3 million downloads. Join us for CAKE!




“Student Art in the Library” to announce winners, Oct. 13

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Winners of the Student Art in the Library exhibition will be announced Monday, October 13. The campus is invited to drop by the exhibit space in the Miles Reading Room, 135 Hodges Library, at 4 p.m., for the announcement and a reception.

The Student Art in the Library juried exhibition is held twice per year and is open to all currently enrolled students, in all disciplines. Selected artworks are on display in the Miles Reading Room throughout the semester. The contest awards a First Prize of $300, Second Prize of $150, and Third Prize of $75.




National Book Award nominee Elizabeth McCracken to read October 22

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McCrackenElizabeth McCracken will read from her latest short story collection, Thunderstruck & Other Stories, at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Wednesday, October 22, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

McCracken is the author of five books, most recently Thunderstruck, currently on the long list for the 2014 National Book Award in fiction. Her other books include National Book Award finalist The Giant’s House and New York Times Book Review Notable Books An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination and Niagara Falls All Over Again. McCracken is currently James A. Michener Chair of Creative Writing at the University of Texas at Austin.

Thunderstruck is a collection of nine stories featuring a variety of eclectic characters, including a girl ghost, the human musical saw, and two three-legged dogs, among others. Publishers Weekly heralded the work as “mesmerizing and strange,” and commented that McCracken “transforms life’s dead ends into transformational visions.”

In addition to the reading, the author will participate in a Q&A discussion about her work at 3 p.m. in 1210 McClung Tower on October 22. The discussion is open to all UT students and faculty.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

Christopher Hebert, the UT Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, emcees Writers in the Library events. Hebert and Marilyn Kallet, director of the UT Creative Writing Program, have lined up an exceptional group of authors to read in the 2014–2015 academic year. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@utk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@utk.edu).

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Ingrid Kopp, Tribeca Digital Initiatives, at Hodges Library Sept. 30

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KoppAn Evening with Ingrid Kopp, Tribeca Digital Initiatives
September 30th, 7:30pm
Hodges Library Auditorium

An innovator in interactive storytelling and maker culture, Ingrid Kopp is Director of Digital Initiatives at the Tribeca Film Institute, where she oversees the TFI New Media Fund. Recent supported projects include Alma, Hollow, Lyka’s Adventure and Question Bridge. Ingrid leads the Institute’s other digital and interactive programs including the TFI Interactive conference and the Tribeca Hacks hackathon series bringing storytellers, technologists and designers together to explore new projects and collaborations. She also curates the Tribeca Storyscapes program for interactive, transmedia work at the Tribeca Film Festival. Ingrid is constantly working at the intersection between storytelling, technology, design and social change and is a frequent speaker on the subject. You can always find her on Twitter: @fromthehip
 

 




Financial Literacy Boot Camp, Oct. 10

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Learn to manage your money at the Financial Literacy Boot Camp, October 10. Students can attend the full day of workshops or drop-in on individual sessions. All sessions will be held in the Lindsay Young Auditorium, 101 John C. Hodges Library.

Financial Literacy Boot Camp
Hodges Library auditorium

    8:30 – 9:30
    Marketing scams & consumer manipulation
    Speaker: Dr. David Schumann
    Professor, Dept. of Marketing & Supply Chain Management, UT
    Emeritus Director of the Teaching & Learning Center, UT

    9:30 – 10:30
    Why we need insurance
    Speaker: Mr. Bruce Meek
    Insurance & Financial Services, Farmers Insurance

    10:30 – 11:30
    Managing finances to accumulate wealth
    Speaker: Mr. Tom Graves
    Lecturer & Operations Director, Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, UT

    2:30 – 3:00
    Introduction to banking & saving
    Speaker: Ms. Wendy Cleveland
    UT Federal Credit Union

    3:00 – 3:30
    Importance of your credit score
    Speaker: Mr. John Fawaz, CFP
    Financial Partners of TN, LLC

    3:30 – 4:30
    Mutual funds: an investment tool
    Speaker: Mr. John Fawaz, CFP
    Financial Partners of TN, LLC

The Financial Literacy Boot Camp continues next spring with day-long workshops in January and April. Watch for further information at tiny.utk.edu/financial_literacy.

The workshops are funded by the UT Alliance of Women Philanthropists.

For further information, contact Judy Li, business librarian (judyli@utk.edu or 974-0013).




Amy Billone at WRITERS IN THE LIBRARY, Sept. 29

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Billone_smallAmy Billone will read from her new poetry collection at UT’s Writers in the Library on Monday, September 29, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Billone’s poetry collection, The Light Changes — named one of Kirkus Review‘s best books of 2013 — invokes the biographical and creative worlds of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Sylvia Plath, and Virginia Woolf. Kirkus has called the book “thrilling in its courageousness, breathtaking in its vividness.” The Light Changes also won the IndieReader Discovery Award in Poetry in 2014.

Amy Billone is currently an associate professor of English at the University of Tennessee, where she teaches courses on 19th century literature, children’s and young adult literature, and world literature. Her areas of expertise include romanticism, children’s and young adult literature, Victorian poetry, gothic studies, creative writing, women writers, and continental poetry. Her scholarly book Little Songs: Women, Silence, and the Nineteenth-Century Sonnet (2007) is informed by her unique perspective as a woman poet. As the only extended study of 19th century female sonneteers, Little Songs sheds light on the overwhelming impact that silence makes, not only on British women’s poetry, but also on the development of modern poetry and thought. Amy Billone also wrote the introduction and notes for the Barnes and Noble Classics edition of Peter Pan (2005).
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the University of Tennessee Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@utk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@utk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters