Dom Flemons – “American Songster” Lecture and Performance March 12

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Dom Flemons

Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 7 PM
Bijou Theatre
Register at knoxfriends.org

Dom Flemons is the “American Songster,” pulling from traditions of old-time folk music to create new sounds. A multi-instrumentalist and singer, Dom has been featured on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross and his new album, Prospect Hill, has received praise from The Boston Globe, Paste Magazine, Living Blues Magazine, and more. His performance will be a lecture/demonstration of the history of old-time folk music and its relevance in today’s diverse musical world with commentary and musical examples as appropriate.




Financial Literacy Boot Camp, Feb. 6

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finances2Learn to manage your money at the Financial Literacy Boot Camp, February 6. Students can attend the full day of workshops or drop-in on individual sessions. All sessions will be held in 211 John C. Hodges Library.

Financial Literacy Boot Camp
Friday, February 6
211 Hodges Library

    9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
    Budgeting—take your financial selfie
    Speaker: Ms. Judy Li
    Business Librarian, UT

    10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
    Managing finances to accumulate wealth
    Speaker: Mr. Tom Graves
    Lecturer & Operations Director, Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, UT

    11:00 a.m. – noon
    Smart shopping with coupons
    Speaker: Ms. Heather Cockrum
    Executive Assistant to the Provost, UT

    noon – 1:00 p.m.
    Pizza lunch — RSVP at www.eventbrite.com/e/financial-literacy-boot-camp-pizza-lunch-tickets-15426915319

    1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
    Introduction to Career Services
    Speaker: Mr. Danny Pape
    College Career Consultant, Haslam College of Business

The workshops are funded by the UT Alliance of Women Philanthropists.

For further information, contact Judy Li, business librarian (judyli@nullutk.edu or 974-0013).




Novelist Jonathan Miles at “Writers in the Library” January 26

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JonathanMiles-2Novelist Jonathan Miles will read from his recent work at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Monday, January 26, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Miles’s most recent novel, Want Not, was selected as a New York Times Notable Book for 2013, a Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2013 and a Washington Post Notable Fiction of 2013 selection. Dear American Airlines was selected as a Best Book of the Year by the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times in 2008. Dave Eggars said in The New York Times Book Review of Want Not, “Jonathan Miles can write, and here he’s written a wonderful book, and there’s no one I would not urge to read it.”

In addition to his novels, Miles has also written a regular column on a variety of subjects — from books to cocktails — for Men’s Journal, Field & Stream, and the New York Times, while also contributing to publications such as GQ, Food & Wine, Outside, Salon.com, the New York Observer, the New York Times Book Review, and many more.

Miles will also be joined by his agent, Sloan Harris of ICM Partners, for a Q&A discussion at 3:30 p.m., January 26, in the Mary Greer Room, 258 Hodges Library.

Read an interview with Jonathan Miles at Chapter 16: a community of Tennessee writers, readers and passersby (brought to you by Humanities Tennessee).

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Christopher Hebert, the UT Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, emcees Writers in the Library events. Hebert and Marilyn Kallet, director of the UT Creative Writing Program, have lined up an exceptional group of authors to read this spring semester. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule.
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters






Writers in the Library: David James Poissant, Nov. 17

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poissantDavid James Poissant will read from his highly acclaimed short story collection, The Heaven of Animals, at UT’s Writers in the Library on Monday, November 17, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public. Prior to the reading, at 3 p.m., he will be available for a Q&A session for UT students and faculty in the Practice Presentation Room, 220 E in Hodges Library Commons North.

The Heaven of Animals was named one of the most anticipated books of 2014 by The Millions. In a starred review, Kirkus describes Poissant’s stories as “Rueful and kind, akin to both Anton Chekhov and Raymond Carver in humane spirit and technical mastery.” Rebecca Lee of The New York Times Book Review touts the collection as “A wise debut . . . Beautiful, with a rogue touch,” and Karen Russell says of his writing, “Like Flannery O’Connor, Poissant’s stories are marked by violence, humor, and grace; like Saunders, he can spoon-bend reality; like Carver and Diaz, he writes scenes soaked in kerosene and seconds from combustion.”

David James Poissant’s stories and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Chicago Tribune, Glimmer Train, The New York Times, One Story, Playboy, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, and in the New Stories from the South and Best New American Voices anthologies. His writing has been awarded the Matt Clark Prize, the George Garrett Fiction Award, the RopeWalk Fiction Chapbook Prize, and the Alice White Reeves Memorial Award from the National Society of Arts & Letters, as well as awards from The Chicago Tribune and The Atlantic and Playboy magazines.

David James Poissant teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida and lives in Orlando with his wife and daughters.

Read an excellent review of The Heaven of Animals at Chapter 16: a community of Tennessee writers, readers and passersby (brought to you by Humanities Tennessee).
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Brown Bag, Oct. 29: Digitizing Tennessee’s historic newspapers

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Historical newspaper records once available only through long hours of research can now be accessed within seconds. Learn about a program that is digitizing Tennessee’s historic newspapers and making them available online.

The public is invited to a Brown Bag Lunch on Wednesday, October 29, at noon in the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street. The speaker will be Louisa Trott, project coordinator for the Tennessee Newspaper Digitization Project, a joint project of the University of Tennessee Libraries and the Tennessee State Library and Archives. Trott will talk about the scope of the project, its value to researchers, how it can be accessed, and will give examples of the many types of information to be found in newspapers from the period.

For the past three years, the UT Libraries has been scanning historic Tennessee newspapers as part of a nationwide project, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, that aims to preserve this “first draft of history.” The first phase of the project concentrated on the Civil War and Reconstruction era, the second on the period of 1870-1900. The digitized newspapers are available to the public at the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America website and are fully searchable.

The program is sponsored by 21st Mortgage. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information call the East Tennessee History Center at 865-215-8824.




Public Invited to Hear Anthropologist Bill Bass, Oct. 30

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BillBass2Over his fifty-year career as an anthropologist, University of Tennessee Professor Emeritus William M. Bass excavated ancient skeletons and recovered the remains of murder victims. He also headed UT’s anthropology department for more than 20 years and trained many of the nation’s current leading forensic anthropologists.

The University of Tennessee Libraries, which holds the research and teaching materials documenting his illustrious career, will honor Bass and celebrate the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection at an upcoming event. The public is invited to a lecture by Bass and a reception in his honor on Thursday, October 30, at UT’s John C. Hodges Library.

A reception in the Jack E. Reese Galleria begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by the lecture in the Lindsay Young Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Guests also may visit Special Collections to view items from the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.

PrintBass is perhaps best known to the general public as the creator of the “Body Farm” — officially the Anthropology Research Center. The Body Farm was the world’s first laboratory for researching the processes and timetable of decomposition of human remains.

Bass has recounted the story of the Body Farm to many audiences. His talk at the UT library will be something different. He will focus on his more traditional pursuits in the field of anthropology, including excavating human skeletal remains in the Great Plains in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution. His field study notebooks from these excavations are among the materials Bass donated to the UT Libraries to create the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.





Keith Flynn and Joyce Jenkins at “Writers in the Library,” Oct. 27

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FlynnJenkinsPoets Keith Flynn and Joyce Jenkins will read from their works at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Monday, October 27, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Keith Flynn is the founder and editor of The Asheville Poetry Review, as well as the author of seven books, including five collections of poetry, most recently Colony Collapse Disorder (Wings Press, 2013). His essays on poetry are collected in The Rhythm Method, Razzmatazz and Memory: How To Make Your Poetry Swing (Writer’s Digest Books, 2007). From 1984 to 1999, he was lyricist and lead singer for The Crystal Zoo; currently he tours with a combo, The Holy Men. He has been awarded the Sandburg Prize for poetry, the ASCAP Emerging Songwriter Prize, the Paumanok Poetry Award, and the 2013 NC Literary Fellowship, and was twice named the Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for North Carolina.

Joyce Jenkins is editor and Executive Director of Poetry Flash, California’s iconic online Literary Review and Calendar for the West (poetryflash.org), founded in 1972. Joyce began working with the magazine in 1978. Poetry Flash presents the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival, Northern California Book Awards, and Poetry Flash Reading Series. She is the author of Portal, a chapbook with an introduction by Carolyn Kizer, and Joy Road, and has read her poetry in the Bay Area and across the country. She received the AAUW Ruth Murray Jones Publishing Award in 1991, American Book Award in 1994, National Poetry Association’s 1995 Award for Distinguished Service, and the 2006 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award for Lifetime Achievement. On behalf of Poetry Flash, she received Litquake’s 2012 Barbary Coast Award. June 6, 2009 was named “Joyce Jenkins Day” by the City of Berkeley in honor of the Berkeley Poetry Festival lifetime achievement award.

At noon, the same day, Katherine Ann Davis, editor of UT’s Grist: The Journal for Writers, will join Flynn and Jenkins for an Editors’ Roundtable at 1210-1211 McClung Tower. They will discuss what editors are looking for when they read submissions — a great networking opportunity for writers who are trying to get published. Refreshments will be served.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a schedule of readings for the 2014-2015 academic year.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Celebrate the Day of the Dead, Oct. 31

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Representations of Catrina, one of the most popular figures of the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico. (©Tomas Castelazo, www.tomascastelazo.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Stop by the Hodges Library (1st floor galleria) and vote for your favorite traditional ofrenda (altars honoring the deceased) created by students from the Second-Year Spanish Program. The Alter Exhibit and Competition will be on view from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

A festival of films, music videos, and documentaries related to the Day of the Dead will run throughout the day in the Hodges Library auditorium.

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday observed throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a bank holiday. The celebration takes place on October 31, November 1 and November 2, in connection with the triduum of Allhallowtide: All Hallows’ Eve, Hallowmas, and All Souls’ Day. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Day_of_the_Dead
,
accessed 14 October 2014]

 

celebracion

 

 

 

Visit the Second-Year Spanish Program’s webpage

 

 

 




National Day on Writing, Oct. 20

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GraffitiWalkJoin the UT Libraries and The Writing Center to celebrate the National Day on Writing, Monday, October 20, noon to 2:00 in the Hodges Library Commons.

Add your comments to the Graffiti Walk and pick up copies of student publications such as Pursuit: The Journal of Undergraduate Research.

The National Day on Writing draws attention to the remarkable variety of writing we engage in. People in every walk of life, in every kind of work, and at every age write more than ever before for personal, professional, and civic purposes. Furthermore, new technologies expand the possibilities for composing in multiple media and for speaking to wider audiences than ever before and at a faster pace than ever before in our history.

Celebrate with us and demonstrate your facility with the quip, the pun, or the bon mot at our Graffiti Walk.