Presentation on the PIGEON RIVER RECOVERY PROJECT: 2001 to 2010

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Joyce A. Coombs presenting at Pendergrass Library, Tuesday, March 23, 3:00-4:00

In 2001, a cooperative effort was begun to restore native fish populations to the Pigeon River, once so polluted that all mollusks and many fish species were extirpated. Volunteers from federal and state agencies, industry, and private organizations created the Pigeon River Recovery Project to begin re-introduction of fish and other aquatic species. Early successes in TN led to the expansion of the project into western NC. Twenty species of fish collected from the French Broad basin and the upper reaches of the Pigeon River have been re-introduced into the Pigeon River at selected sites in TN and NC. Reproduction was first documented in gilt darters in 2003. Monitoring surveys over the past five years have documented gilt, bluebreast, and stripetail darters, mountain madtoms, and mountain brook lampreys in the Pigeon River near Newport, TN. In 2005, a survey of the lower five miles of the Pigeon River documented gilt darters in nearly every riffle; this species appears to be re-colonizing the lower Pigeon River. As of 2008, the stripetail darter and the mountain brook lamprey have also established populations. Of nine transplanted species in NC, four shiners (mirror, telescope, Tennessee, silver) and the gilt darter have been collected during monitoring efforts. Silver and telescope shiners have re-established populations in a 10-mile reach of the Pigeon River in NC. Management of this project must be flexible. Continued relocation of selected species in TN and NC reaches will be undertaken based on available habitat and reproductive success of targeted species.

Coombs*, J.A., and Wilson, J. L., Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, University of Tennessee.
Burr, J. E., Division of Water Pollution Control, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.
Fraley, S. J., Division of Inland Fisheries, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

Joyce Coombs received a B.S. in Biology from James Madison University and worked for the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife for the state of Washington. She was awarded a M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from the University of Tennessee in 2003 and since 2003 has been employed by UT-Knoxville as a Research Associate and coordinator for the Pigeon River Recovery Project.




Card swipe entry system coming to Hodges Library

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Enhanced Security for Hodges Library: Activation of Card Swipe System Underway

The UT Libraries are in the process of implementing a card swipe entry system for the Hodges Library between the hours of midnight and 7 AM, Sunday through Thursday. The second floor Melrose door will serve as the sole entry point for UT students, faculty, and staff during these hours, and a swipe of the VolCard will be required to enter. Individuals may still exit at the ground floor doors, but entry will be closed between midnight and 7 AM at the Volunteer entrance.

Please look for additional publicity regarding the start date for the card swipe activation and be prepared to carry your VolCard with you. Announcement of a start date will be made well in advance of activation.




Libraries’ Newfound Press publishes study of Cormac McCarthy

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WakeOfSunNewfound Press has just published a new study on one of America’s leading authors. In In the Wake of the Sun: Navigating the Southern Works of Cormac McCarthy, Christopher J. Walsh offers close textual analysis of all McCarthy’s Southern works along with an overview of the notable critical responses to them. The book introduces readers, scholars, and students to the pertinent themes in each work, guiding readers through the most significant critical dialogues surrounding the texts.

McCarthy’s works set in the desert Southwest have received substantial critical and commercial acclaim. However, his Appalachian texts — which include two short stories written as an undergraduate at the University of Tennessee, five novels (including the Pulitzer Prize winner The Road), a play, and a screenplay — rival the Southwestern works in terms of their aesthetic achievement and complexity.

Jay Ellis, McCarthy scholar and author of No Place for Home: Spatial Constraint and Character Flight in the Novels of Cormac McCarthy (Routledge, 2006) has written an insightful foreword for Walsh’s work. Ellis predicts, “Those programs that … teach literature by period and place will benefit enormously from inclusion of this book on reading lists for undergraduate and graduate work.” He also highlights the book’s specific value to scholars of Southern literature.

Dr. Walsh obtained a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Wales, Swansea in 2004. He discussed McCarthy’s Southern works in his thesis and has published extensively on McCarthy. Walsh has presented his research at conferences in the United States and Europe and hosted a conference on McCarthy’s writings in 2007. The author has taught at Hull University and the University of Tennessee, and currently works in academic administration in East London.

Newfound Press, a peer-reviewed digital imprint of the University of Tennessee Libraries, demonstrates innovative approaches to the creation and dissemination of scholarly and specialized work. In the Wake of the Sun: Navigating the Southern Works of Cormac McCarthy and other Newfound Press publications are freely available online at www.newfoundpress.utk.edu. Printed copies may be purchased from University of Tennessee Press via the website.




Presentation on the PIGEON RIVER RECOVERY PROJECT: 2001 to 2010

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Joyce A. Coombs Presenting at Pendergrass Library Tuesday, March 23, from 3-4

In 2001, a cooperative effort was begun to restore native fish populations to the Pigeon River, once so polluted that all mollusks and many fish species were extirpated. Volunteers from federal and state agencies, industry, and private organizations created the Pigeon River Recovery Project to begin re-introduction of fish and other aquatic species. Early successes in TN led to the expansion of the project into western NC. Twenty species of fish collected from the French Broad basin and the upper reaches of the Pigeon River have been re-introduced into the Pigeon River at selected sites in TN and NC. Reproduction was first documented in gilt darters in 2003. Monitoring surveys over the past five years have documented gilt, bluebreast, and stripetail darters, mountain madtoms, and mountain brook lampreys in the Pigeon River near Newport, TN. In 2005, a survey of the lower five miles of the Pigeon River documented gilt darters in nearly every riffle; this species appears to be re-colonizing the lower Pigeon River. As of 2008, the stripetail darter and the mountain brook lamprey have also established populations. Of nine transplanted species in NC, four shiners (mirror, telescope, Tennessee, silver) and the gilt darter have been collected during monitoring efforts. Silver and telescope shiners have re-established populations in a 10-mile reach of the Pigeon River in NC. Management of this project must be flexible. Continued relocation of selected species in TN and NC reaches will be undertaken based on available habitat and reproductive success of targeted species.

Coombs*, J.A., and Wilson, J. L., Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, University of Tennessee.
Burr, J. E., Division of Water Pollution Control, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.
Fraley, S. J., Division of Inland Fisheries, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission

Joyce Coombs received a B.S. in Biology from James Madison University and worked for the Dept of Fisheries and Wildlife for the state of Washington. She was awarded a M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from the University of Tennessee in 2003 and since 2003 have been employed by UT-Knoxville as a Research Associate and coordinator for the Pigeon River Recovery Project.

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MUSIC LIBRARY MOVING TO HUMANITIES

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We'll be Bach

Due to the upcoming demolition and rebuilding of the Music Building, the Music Library will close temporarily on May 12th, the day after final exams, to move to an interim location on the ground floor of the Humanities and Social Sciences Building (Rooms 62-65).  The Music Library will reopen on Thursday, July 1st. 

Online resources accessible through the Music Library homepage http://www.lib.utk.edu/music/ will still be available for use, but the physical collection will be inaccessible during this time.   If possible, please check out before May 12th, all materials you may need during May and June. If you have an unanticipated need, please request the item through the Libraries’ catalog and also send an e-mail to Connie Steigenga (willow1@utk.edu).  When possible, Music Library staff will try to fulfill these special requests.  The loan periods of all materials will be extended to the July 1st re-opening date, but you may also return items to Hodges Library. 

For more information on our new location, please see http://www.lib.utk.edu/music/newlocation.html.








Friday@Pendergrass: Sign up for UTAlert text messaging and register your equipment

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Stop by March 05 between 10:30 and 12:30 to register for UT Alert registration or to register your personal property and have it engraved. Officers will have information about campus resources such as the T:Link and T:Late Nite for getting around safely.

UT ALERT is a text messaging system that allows the university to communicate with members of the campus community quickly in the event of an emergency. Once a person completes the sign-up process, notifications may be sent through text messages and e-mail.

For more information on campus safety, visit http://safety.utk.edu.

To sign up for UT ALERT, visit https://www.utk.edu/utalert.




Library Hours for Spring Semester 2010

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2010 Spring Semester Hours

Wednesday 1/12/2010 – Sunday 5/2/2010
7:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.  Monday - Thursday
7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Friday
10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Saturday
1:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Sunday

Exceptions

Martin Luther King Day
Closed Monday 1/18/2010
Spring Break
Monday  3/8/2010 - Friday 3/12/2010
7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Spring Recess
Friday 4/2/2010 - Sunday 4/4/2010
Closed
Finals
7:30 a.m. - 12:00 a.m.  Monday 5/3/2010 - Thursday 5/6/2010
7:30 a.m. - 8:00 pm  Friday 5/7/2010
9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday 5/8/2010
12:00 p.m - 12:00 a.m.  Sunday 5/9/2010
7:30 a.m. - 12:00 a.m. Monday 5/10/2010
7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Tuesday 5/11/2010

All UT Library Hours: http://www.lib.utk.edu/hours/