NEW: Free Access to the Entrepreneurship Research and Policy Network!

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Access to the Social Science Research Network’s Entrepreneurship Research and Policy Network (ERPN) is now available to the University community. ERPN’s resources include professional announcements (calls for papers, conferences, etc.), professional job listings, a professional directory, and free access to worldwide research papers. SSRN’s goal is to “provide worldwide distribution of research to authors and their readers and to facilitate communication among them at the lowest possible cost.” Major topics available include Entrepreneurial Education, Innovation and Growth, Economics, Finance, Law, Management, Marketing, and Social Entrepreneurship.

This site is available through our online catalog (search Social Science Research Network, SSRN, or Entrepreneurship Research & Policy Network) and requires registration with a valid utk.edu email address. Please contact us with any questions you may have or for registration assistance.




Films in March

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Film Movement Film Series

Tuesday, March 11
7:30pm Hodges Library Auditorium
The Way I Spent The End Of The World
Romania / d. Catalin Mitulescu / 106 min
Set in Romania towards the end of the Ceausescu regime, The Way I Spent the End of the World depicts a few months in the life of one family as they deal with universal struggles like raising kids, finding work, and abiding by societal expectations

March 25, 2008
7:30pm Hodges Library Auditorium
Fraulein
Switzerland / d. Andrea Staka / 81 min
Fraulein explores questions of nationality, immigration and generational differences through the lives and friendships of three women from the former Yugoslavia living in Zurich and working in a cafeteria

Biology Nights

Thursday, March 27
6:30 PM Hodges Library 253
Too Hot Not to Handle: Winning the Battle Against Global Warming
Run Time: 55 min.
This film offers a wealth of scientific evidence for dire climate-change predictions–but it also shows how businesses, local governments, and citizens can take positive action to reduce future dangers. With in-depth discussions of what may lie ahead, including increases in storm surges, hurricanes, water pollution, forest fires, and epidemics, the program promotes the urgently needed use of alternative energy sources, such as biodiesel, clean-burning coal, and wind and solar power. Interviews with leading climatologists and environmental health experts enliven the film’s two-pronged focus on perils and solutions.




Michael Knight to Read at Writers in the Library, March 10

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Michael Knight, UT associate professor of creative writing, will read from his recently published book, The Holiday Season, at the March 10th Writers in the Library event.

In the first of two novellas comprising The Holiday Season, a father and two adult sons struggle through the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays to redefine their relationships after the death of the wife and mother who bound them together. The second novella, set during one New Year’s Eve, “is packed with people brought into uncomfortable proximity on a night traditionally given over to optimism.” [New York Times Book Review].

Earlier books by Michael Knight include Divining Rod, a novel, and two collections of stories, Goodnight, Nobody and Dogfight and Other Stories.

Knight sets his narratives in his native Alabama — and to good advantage. “Nobody writes about the contemporary Southern upper middle class as well as Michael Knight,” according to the Mobile Register. “Knight’s writing [is] understated, graceful, easy. At the same time, he is no stranger to the Southern Gothic tradition, which is to say he peoples his novel with characters whose eccentricities, at once comic and sad, are accepted and everyday,” says the Washington Post Book World. And the New York Times Book Review allows: “For all its dark insight into human entanglements, Knight’s fiction also contained surprising jolts of humor.”

Join Writers in the Library at 7 pm, Monday, March 10, in the UT Hodges Library auditorium to experience Michael Knight’s own Southern blend of realism and humor.




Chuck Berry: Hail! Hail! RocknRoll

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Taylor Hackford’s Chuck Berry. Hail! Hail! Rock ‘n’ roll
Chatsworth, CA : Distributed exclusively by Image Entertainment, [2006].


DVD: ML420 .B365 T3 2006

The unforgettable life and music of pioneering legend Chuck Berry celebrated in this landmark feature film, capturing a once-in-a-lifetime gathering of rock and roll’s finest! In 1986, Keith Richards invited a roster of great musicians to honor Chuck Berry for an evening of music to commemorate Berry on his 60th birthday, including performances by Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, Linda Ronstadt, Etta James and Julian Lennon. This crowd pleaser from director Taylor Hackford will keep you toes tapping and your soul rocking all night long!



Student Art in the Library – Call for submissions

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UT Libraries seeks submissions to the Fall Student Art in the Library exhibition. Entrants must be registered graduate or undergraduate students. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, April 8.

Selected artwork will be installed in May and remain on view through November 2008 in first floor reference room, Hodges Library. For more info, contact Jennifer Beals at 974-0014 or jbeals@nullutk.edu.

Student Art in the Library: http://www.lib.utk.edu/refs/artinlibrary/




Who are the Melungeons? Wayne Winkler to speak, March 11

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****EVENT MOVED TO THE MARY E. GREER ROOM****
****258 Hodges Library (at Melrose Ave. entrance)****

Who are the Melungeons? These mysterious inhabitants of Hancock County, Tennessee and environs are one of a number of “tri-racial isolate”* groups living in southern Appalachia. Like other mixed-race groups, they were the targets of legal and social restrictions enacted during the 19th — and even the early 20th — century.

The historical origins of the Melungeons are the subject of many conflicting theories. Are they of Gypsy or Turkish ancestry? The descendants of shipwrecked sailors? A longstanding myth even proclaimed them an indigenous people, inhabiting Appalachia before the arrival of the first white settlers. And present-day genetic studies have not provided a conclusive answer to the question of their origins.

To learn more about the Melungeons, join us to hear Wayne Winkler on Tuesday, March 11, 11:00 am, in 605 Hodges Library. Winkler, himself of Melungeon ancestry, is the former president of the Melungeon Heritage Association and author of Walking Toward the Sunset: The Melungeons of Appalachia.

A collection of books on the Melungeons is available in our Culture Corner, 1st floor, Hodges Library.

*Tri-racial describes populations thought to be of mixed European, sub-Saharan African, and Native American ancestry.




Topiary artist Pearl Fryar to visit UT, Feb. 27-28

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Self-taught topiary artist Pearl Fryar will visit UT this month. Fryar, an African American man in his mid-60s who began creating a three-acre topiary garden in 1984 in an effort to win Yard of the Month for his home, has become an international phenomenon and is the subject of an award-winning film.

The film, A Man Named Pearl, will be screened at the Cox Auditorium, Alumni Memorial Hall, Wednesday, February 27, 7 pm. A discussion with Mr. Fryar will follow the film. The film offers an upbeat message that speaks to respect for both self and others, and shows what one person can achieve when he allows himself to share the full expression of his humanity.

Fryar will also visit the Pendergrass Library on the agricultural campus on Thursday, February 28. A reception will be held in his honor at 5:30 pm in the library, followed by a demonstration of his work at 6:00 pm.

Support for these events is provided by Ready For The World, the Commission for Women, the Black Cultural Center, and the UT Libraries Diversity Committee.




Topiary artist Pearl Fryar to visit UT, Feb. 27-28

Posted on


Self-taught topiary artist Pearl Fryar will visit UT this month. Fryar, an African American man in his mid-60s who began creating a three-acre topiary garden in 1984 in an effort to win Yard of the Month for his home, has become an international phenomenon and is the subject of an award-winning film.

The film, A Man Named Pearl, will be screened at the Cox Auditorium, Alumni Memorial Hall, Wednesday, February 27, 7 pm. A discussion with Mr. Fryar will follow the film. The film offers an upbeat message that speaks to respect for both self and others, and shows what one person can achieve when he allows himself to share the full expression of his humanity.

Fryar will also visit the Pendergrass Library on the agricultural campus on Thursday, February 28. A reception will be held in his honor at 5:30 pm in the library, followed by a demonstration of his work at 6:00 pm.

Support for these events is provided by Ready For The World, the Commission for Women, the Black Cultural Center, and the UT Libraries Diversity Committee.




ProTools workshop in Hodges Library

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Beyond GarageBand: Introduction to ProTools.
Taught by Matt Jordan of the Music Library, this class is designed to introduce participants to Pro Tools, an industry standard audio recording software. This hour long class, on February 13 from 4:00-5:00 in Room 127 of Hodges Library, will be a discussion and demonstration only. Although there is not a hands-on section, attendees should gain a basic understanding of the software.
Click here for more information and to register.