Children’s and Young Adult Collection Relocates, Changes Name

Former Juvenile Collection moves from Reserve to third floor

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Amelia Bedelia, Babar, Paddington Bear and Dr. Seuss have a new home in Hodges Library. The Children’s and Young Adult Collection, formerly known as the Juvenile Collection, is now located in the northwest corner of the third floor.

The Children’s and Young Adult Collection has approximately 20,000 titles, with about 2/3 fiction and 1/3 non-fiction. The loan period for books in this collection has also been extended, from seven days to 28 days.

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Children’s and Young Adult Collection Relocates, Changes Name

Former Juvenile Collection moves from Reserve to third floor

Amelia Bedelia, Babar, Paddington Bear and Dr. Seuss have a new home in Hodges Library. The Children’s and Young Adult Collection, formerly known as the Juvenile Collection, is now located in the northwest corner of the third floor.

The Children’s and Young Adult Collection has approximately 20,000 titles, with about 2/3 fiction and 1/3 non-fiction. The loan period for books in this collection has also been extended, from seven days to 28 days.

The Children’s and Young Adult Collection at the UT Libraries supplements the university’s Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature. The center is dedicated to promoting the use of literature in the education and lives of children and young adults. The center also provides an outreach program that serves the community with both educational workshops and entertaining events.

Click here for more information about the Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature.

Click here to search the UT Libraries catalog for your favorite children’s and young adult books.

The Film Movement Series

See international and independent films at Hodges Library

Moviegoers now have a chance to sample award-winning, first-run independent and international feature films that are unlikely to be screened elsewhere in Knoxville. The UT Libraries’ Film Movement Series will show sixteen films every Tuesday from August 30 to December 13 in the John C. Hodges Library Auditorium at 8 p.m. The film screenings are free and open to the public.

Although a few of the films are American-made, most hail from Europe, Australia, Africa, South America and Canada. Many have received accolades akin to Academy Awards in their home countries.

“The international flair of the Film Movement Series is an excellent opportunity to experience other cultures and styles of filmmaking,” Media Services Librarian Troy Davis said.

The Film Movement Series is just one of the many ways the UT Libraries is broadening its film collection and developing programming centered on the expanding medium of film.

The UT Libraries and the UT Cinema Studies program worked with Film Movement, a grassroots movement that provides access to the best foreign and independent films made each year, to bring these first-run films to the library at the same time they are released in theaters. For film summaries, reviews, trailers, credits and schedules, visit the UT Libraries Film Movement Series Web site.

Library Reserve and Loaner Laptop Checkout Change Locations

Library reserve materials and loaner laptop checkout recently changed locations.

RESERVE
Reserve materials can now be found at the main circulation desk, near the Melrose Avenue entrance.

Faculty and instructors who need help making reserve items available can contact Digital Production Services at 974-4121, or stop by Hodges Library room 170 (formerly Duplication) between 8:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. to consult with Digital Production staff. Reserve lists may also be dropped off in Hodges Library room 235.

Click here for more information about reserve materials.

LOANER LAPTOPS
You can now check out loaner laptops in Reserve, room 235 in Hodges Library. Any UT students with valid IDs, fines of less than $5.00, and no overdue recalls on their library records may check out a loaner laptop.

Click here for more information about library loaner laptops.

Exhibit Features Smoky Mountains Photographs

Trailblazers: Jim Thompson and Albert “Dutch” Roth Photographs of the Early Years of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park on exhibit at the Ewing Gallery through August 28

Images of the Appalachian Trail, the Smoky Mountains Hiking Club, moonshiners, logging, road building, and the majesty and beauty of the Smoky Mountains are featured in this photographic exhibit at the Ewing Gallery, which runs from June 17 through August 28, 2005.

Amateur photographers Jim Thompson and Albert “Dutch” Roth were among the first to photograph the area that would become the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Thanks to the efforts of the University of Tennessee Libraries, their photographs have been preserved and digitized as part of a project through UT’s Digital Library Center.

For more information about the exhibit, please visit the Ewing Gallery Web site.

For more information about the Digital Library Center, visit their Web site.

UT Libraries Ranks Among Top Libraries in the Nation

A recent study has ranked the University of Tennessee Libraries among the top research libraries in the nation.

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) ranked UT Libraries third in the Southeastern Conference, 27th out of 68 public research university libraries in the U.S. and Canada, and 45th among all 113 ARL-affiliated research institutions.

This is a significant rise for UT from the year before, when UT was 32nd among public research institutions and 53rd overall.

The report also noted that UT had the fifth largest increase in total expenditures, about 55 percent since the 1998-99 academic year.

“An excellent library is an essential component of a first-rate research university,” UT Knoxville Chancellor Loren Crabtree said. “At the University of Tennessee, we are proud to have one of our nation’s finest university libraries and we are committed to building and supporting this excellence at the core of our learning community.”

Eight SEC schools made the list, including Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Kentucky, LSU, Auburn and Alabama.

The top five ARL libraries are Harvard, Yale, University of Toronto, University of California-Berkeley and the University of California-Los Angeles.

“We are very proud to be in the top 50 of this elite group,” UT Libraries Dean Barbara Dewey said. “Having the consistent support of the university is crucial to our success.”

ARL considers five key factors in compiling its rankings each year: total number of volumes held, gross number of volumes added, number of subscriptions to current journals, magazines, newspapers and other periodicals, total expenditures and the number of professional and support staff.

The University of Tennessee Libraries supports more than 20,000 undergraduate and 6,000 graduate students enrolled in 400 academic programs in 15 schools and colleges.

UT Libraries offers reference and instructional services, public and cultural programs, technological and media resources, subject liaisons in a variety of disciplines, and promote information literacy.

For more information about the UT Libraries, visit their Web page.

The Association of Research Libraries was founded in 1932 in order to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the communities they serve. For more information, visit their Web page.

Veterinary Record now online

Veterinary Record is now available electronically from 2002–present.
Click here for the convenience list (.pdf) of veterinary journals which is updated to reflect the electronic availability of Vet Record, for those who like to have a copy in the office/lab.

The online version of Veterinary Record can be found through the Library Catalog.

Culture Corner to feature Appalachia

University Libraries encourages patrons to ‘hear’ native voices

The Diversity Committee of University Libraries has unveiled its new theme – Appalachia – for the Culture Corner, located in the first floor galleria of John C. Hodges Library. Visit the Culture Corner Web site.

“This summer’s Culture Corner theme of Appalachia is the Diversity Committee’s effort to make the UT community aware of a region that many have heard of but may not know much about,” said Kawanna Bright, reference librarian and Culture Corner coordinator. “The selection of Appalachia is also done in recognition of the diversity that is the Appalachian region, emphasizing topics and issues that illustrate the people, history, culture and environment that encompass the region.”

The broad range of topics covered provide patrons with the “voices” and “experiences” of the peoples of Appalachia through their religion, music, storytelling, arts and crafts, food and drink, literature and language, education and notable people – as well as through the flora, fauna and the environment. Bright said that one of the key objectives of the Culture Corner is to introduce the university community to different cultures, both near and far, while showcasing library resources on particular topics.

“This is one of the main goals of the Culture Corner in general: to bring together books, videos and electronic resources related to a topic into one easy-to-access location, thus allowing users to browse and view many different aspects of a topic without having to go from floor to floor and shelf to shelf to locate the items,” Bright said.

In addition to the books collected together in the galleria, a bibliography is available that includes juvenile, electronic, reference and media resources. For a complete list of all titles and resources, please visit the Culture Corner Web site.

This semester marks the fifth that the Diversity Committee has collected resources on a specific theme in order to expand the educational horizons of library patrons. Previously featured themes have been Islam, the environment and topics related to the university.