Writers in the Library celebrates Valentine’s with poetry, chocolate

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Three poetesses to slam, perform verse

Ah, l’amour. Maybe not so much. Who needs romantic candlelight when you can have chocolate and poetry? Writers in the Library will feature three local poets, Marilyn Kallet, Kali Meister and Julia Nance, who will perform their verse on Monday, Feb. 14 at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium at Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public.

Kallet is the author of nine books, and will read from her most recent publication, Circe, After Hours, published by the BkMk Press at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. Her poems have appeared in hundreds of literary magazines, and she has won the Tennessee Arts Commission Literary Fellowship in poetry, and was named Outstanding Woman in the Arts by the Knoxville YWCA in 2000. Marilyn Kallet directed the creative writing program at the University of Tennessee for seventeen years and now holds the Hodges Chair for Distinguished Teaching in English.

Meister, who is currently pursuing a psychology degree at UT, has dabbled in a bit of all performance art, including acting in motion pictures such as Leap of Faith, Dazed and Confused, JFK and I’ll Take the Cheesecake. She has toured comedy clubs in the Southwest, and has directed Talking With at the Oak Ridge Playhouse and the 2003 UT run of The Vagina Monologues. She has recently been published in The Pegasus Review and Prism.

Nance, who studied Creative Writing at UT, has garnered numerous accolades for her slamming skills, winning the Chicago Green Mill Slam and placing in the LEAF Slam. She performs in Knoxville frequently and shares the title of Knoxville’s Slam Mistress with Rhea Sunshine. Nance presents a Themed Slam held every second Friday at the Emporium on Gay Street, and will have a two-day show at the Knox Word Spoken Word Showcase to be held at the Black Box on April 8-9. Her work has been published in Breathing the Same Air, Number One, Savoy as well as a self-published chapbook, syntaxxx.

The Writers in the Library series is sponsored by the University of Tennessee Libraries and the Creative Writing Program of the UT English Department. For further information, please contact Jo Anne Deeken, Head of Technical Services, UT Libraries, at 974-6905 or R.B. Morris, Writer in Residence, UT Libraries, at 974-3004.




Writers in the Library: Elizabeth Gilbert to read

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Noted author Elizabeth Gilbert will read at Writers in the Library on Monday, January 31 at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of Hodges Library on the UT Campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Gilbert has written creative nonfiction for Spin, Esquire and Harper’s, as well as short stories and novels. One piece she wrote for GQ about her time working in a Manhattan bar became the basis for the 2000 film Coyote Ugly.

Gilbert majored in political science at NYU and then headed west to Wyoming to work as a ranch hand after graduation, although she always knew she wanted to be a writer. “Everything I did in my twenties was with an eye toward creating experiences to write about, gathering landscapes and voices,” Gilbert said in an interview in Poets & Writers. “I went West for the same reason I worked at a diner and in bars, the same reason I talked to every single person I ever met: just to learn.”




UT Libraries Seek Applicants for Minority Librarian Residency Program

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Successful program seeks new residents

Building on the success of its first program, which was launched in 2003, the UT Libraries is looking for three new candidates for the two-year residency program. The new residency candidates will begin employment in the fall of 2005. The purpose of the program is to attract recent library school graduates from underrepresented groups to a challenging and rewarding career in academic librarianship.

Successful candidates will serve as residents for two years and may be eligible for permanent employment as faculty upon completion of the program. Residents will work closely with librarians to develop skills and career plans, develop collegial relationships with faculty outside the library, participate in library committees, and become involved with professional associations.

Residents will work in several areas of the library and will take part in a variety of initiatives and projects.




“Love Your Libraries” 5K Run and Fun Walk to benefit UT Libraries

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UT Athletics shows its love by matching funds

FunRun-blog.jpgThirteen is a lucky number for the libraries at the University of Tennessee this year, as it marks the 13th anniversary of the annual Love Your Libraries 5K Run and Fun Walk co-sponsored by the Graduate Student Senate and the Knoxville Track Club. The race will be held Saturday, February 19, 2005.

“Experts suggest that walking 10,000 steps per day is the best way to lose weight and stay healthy. What better way to get in your 10,000 steps than by stepping out for the Libraries? The Fun Run allows you to get some extra exercise while contributing to a great cause,” Barbara Dewey, Dean of Libraries, said.

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“Love Your Libraries” 5K Run and Fun Walk to benefit UT Libraries

Posted on


UT Athletics shows its love by matching funds

Thirteen is a lucky number for the libraries at the University of Tennessee this year, as it marks the 13th anniversary of the annual Love Your Libraries 5K Run and Fun Walk co-sponsored by the Graduate Student Senate and the Knoxville Track Club. The race will be held Saturday, February 19, 2005.

“Experts suggest that walking 10,000 steps per day is the best way to lose weight and stay healthy. What better way to get in your 10,000 steps than by stepping out for the Libraries? The Fun Run allows you to get some extra exercise while contributing to a great cause,” Barbara Dewey, Dean of Libraries, said.

The race will begin at 9 a.m. at Circle Park Drive, and the course will wind through the heart of UT campus. The one-mile Fun Walk will begin right after the 5K run. An awards ceremony will follow the race; awards will be given to the top three runners overall, 1st Masters (40+), 1st Grand Masters (50+) as well as awards given by age and gender.

Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. in Circle Park, or interested participants can pre-register before Feb. 11. Pre-registration is $12 and late registration, including race day sign up, is $15. Every year, UT Athletics supports the University Libraries by matching Fun Run proceeds dollar-for-dollar.

In the past, Fun Run proceeds have been used to purchase electronic journals, which graduate students rely upon for research. This year, in honor of UT’s Environmental Semester, proceeds will be put toward materials with an environmental focus.

For more information, call the Graduate Student Senate office at 865-974-2377 or visit the GSS Web site. Registration forms are available at the Knoxville Track Club’s Web site.




University of Tennessee Libraries to host Environmental Semester Film and Discussion Series

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The University of Tennessee Libraries will host a FREE six-part viewing and discussion series as part of UT’s Environmental Semester. As part of its Documentaries in the Library series, this spring’s showings will focus on independently produced documentary films that offer a wide range of approaches and contributions to our understanding of nature, environmentalism, media literacy, and activism.

As part of UT’s Environmental Semester, Documentaries in the Library invites the university and Knoxville community to discuss and discover how filmmakers have contributed to the diversity of environmental discourses through the documentary form. The first film, CultureJam: Hijacking Commercial Culture, will be screened on Wednesday, February 23, 2005, at 7:00 p.m. in Hodges Library’s Lindsay Young Auditorium. This film looks at “culture jamming,” the practices and semiotic tactics aimed at disrupting the coherence and rhetoric of media messages.

Other showings will include Proteus: A Nineteenth Century Vision (3/2), a visually-rich meditation whose central figure, Ernst Haeckel, epitomized the troubled intersection of scientific and artistic vision; The Corporation (3/16) is a critical look at the modern corporation that reveals its inner workings, curious history, controversial impacts and possible futures; Amazon Journal (3/30) looks at the destruction of the Brazilian rainforest, but argues that the real tragedies are to be found in our misunderstanding of the region’s indigenous peoples; Fed Up! Genetic Engineering, Industrial Agriculture and Sustainable Alternatives (4/6) presents an overview of our current food production system and looks at sustainable alternatives. The final session (4/27) will be devoted to the screenings of the winners and selected entries of UT Libraries’ Recycled Video Contest. This festival will showcase the creativity of the UT community in “recycling” pubic domain video footage, much of the same footage presented in the series’ other documentaries. All films will be screened at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of Hodges Library on the UT Knoxville campus. Free and open to the public. For more information please visit http://www.lib.utk.edu or contact Troy Davis at 865-974-4726, and/or troydavis@utk.edu.

Leading the discussions for this semester’s series are: Dr. Chris Holmlund, Professor of French, Cinema Studies and Women’s Studies (2/23); Dr. Neil Greenberg, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (3/2); Dr. John Nolt, Professor of Philosophy (3/16); Dr. Dawn Duke, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese (3/30); Dr. Donald Huisingh, Senior Scientist in Sustainable Development at UT’s Energy, Environment and Resources Center (4/6).

“Documentaries in the Library continues to build awareness of how independently-produced documentaries can comment on and contribute to the most important historical, artistic, social and scientific conversations of our time,” said Troy Davis, Media Services Librarian. “On the whole, these films challenge us to see the environment as something beyond ourselves, as something that’s worthy of explanation, but also admiration. Each of these compelling films also enriches our appreciation of the diversity of approaches documentary filmmakers take in their creative attempts to present and represent reality.”