The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

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Library Hours Thanksgiving Week

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During the week of Thanksgiving, Pendergrass Library will be open the following hours:

  • Monday, November 24: Open 7:30 AM to Midnight
  • Tuesday, November 25: Open 7:30 AM to Midnight
  • Wednesday, November 26: Open 7:30 AM to 6:00 PM
  • Thursday, November 27: Closed
  • Friday, November 28: Closed
  • Saturday, November 29: Open 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM
  • Sunday, November 30: Open 1:00 PM to Midnight

Happy Thanksgiving!






Impactstory Helps Researchers Make an Impact

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Impactstory

ImpactStory has created a list of 30 effective steps for researchers to ensure their hard work makes a difference in their field and with the public.  They are sharing one step a day on the Impactstory blog during the month of November and encourage followers of the blog to give each one a try. Impactstory is an open-source, web-based tool that helps researchers explore and share the diverse impact on all their research products.

You can view the blog using the link above or follow along via email.




Writers in the Library: David James Poissant, Nov. 17

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poissantDavid James Poissant will read from his highly acclaimed short story collection, The Heaven of Animals, at UT’s Writers in the Library on Monday, November 17, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public. Prior to the reading, at 3 p.m., he will be available for a Q&A session for UT students and faculty in the Practice Presentation Room, 220 E in Hodges Library Commons North.

The Heaven of Animals was named one of the most anticipated books of 2014 by The Millions. In a starred review, Kirkus describes Poissant’s stories as “Rueful and kind, akin to both Anton Chekhov and Raymond Carver in humane spirit and technical mastery.” Rebecca Lee of The New York Times Book Review touts the collection as “A wise debut . . . Beautiful, with a rogue touch,” and Karen Russell says of his writing, “Like Flannery O’Connor, Poissant’s stories are marked by violence, humor, and grace; like Saunders, he can spoon-bend reality; like Carver and Diaz, he writes scenes soaked in kerosene and seconds from combustion.”

David James Poissant’s stories and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The Chicago Tribune, Glimmer Train, The New York Times, One Story, Playboy, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, and in the New Stories from the South and Best New American Voices anthologies. His writing has been awarded the Matt Clark Prize, the George Garrett Fiction Award, the RopeWalk Fiction Chapbook Prize, and the Alice White Reeves Memorial Award from the National Society of Arts & Letters, as well as awards from The Chicago Tribune and The Atlantic and Playboy magazines.

David James Poissant teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida and lives in Orlando with his wife and daughters.

Read an excellent review of The Heaven of Animals at Chapter 16: a community of Tennessee writers, readers and passersby (brought to you by Humanities Tennessee).
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Free Tutoring in Pendergrass Library!

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The Office of Multicultural Student Life is joining the tutoring community available at Pendergrass Library.  This free service offers tutoring to those students enrolled in any section of the following courses:

  • Animal Sciences 220
  • Biology 150
  • Biology 160
  • Chemistry 120
  • Chemistry 130

The tutoring service is open to all students and no appointments are required.  Tutors will be available every Wednesday (5:00 – 8:00 p.m.) and Sunday (3:00 – 6:00 p.m.) during the fall semester.

For more information, please contact the Office of Multicultural Student Life.




Publish in PeerJ for Free Until Nov 30th (and beyond)

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PeerJ has announced that from now until November 30th 2014 they publish your article for free.

If you are a Faculty member, you can already receive a PeerJ membership using our prepaid PeerJ fund, but this opportunity allows everyone else to have the opportunity to use PeerJ’s innovative publishing platform. (Two of PeerJ’s most notable innovations are a preprint service and digital object identifiers (DOIs) for peer reviews.  Find out more by reading the PeerJ Blog.)

More information about PeerJ can also be found on the guide to PeerJ.
Want to publish in another Open Access Journal? Check out the Open Access Publishing Support Fund.
Want to help figure out where else you can publish? Check out these Indicators of Journal Quality and the Assessing the Impact of Research guides.
Want to make your already published research more accessible? Consider depositing a copy in TRACE.

For more information, visit this libguide.

 




Brown Bag, Oct. 29: Digitizing Tennessee’s historic newspapers

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Historical newspaper records once available only through long hours of research can now be accessed within seconds. Learn about a program that is digitizing Tennessee’s historic newspapers and making them available online.

The public is invited to a Brown Bag Lunch on Wednesday, October 29, at noon in the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street. The speaker will be Louisa Trott, project coordinator for the Tennessee Newspaper Digitization Project, a joint project of the University of Tennessee Libraries and the Tennessee State Library and Archives. Trott will talk about the scope of the project, its value to researchers, how it can be accessed, and will give examples of the many types of information to be found in newspapers from the period.

For the past three years, the UT Libraries has been scanning historic Tennessee newspapers as part of a nationwide project, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, that aims to preserve this “first draft of history.” The first phase of the project concentrated on the Civil War and Reconstruction era, the second on the period of 1870-1900. The digitized newspapers are available to the public at the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America website and are fully searchable.

The program is sponsored by 21st Mortgage. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information call the East Tennessee History Center at 865-215-8824.




OA Week: The Open Standard – News About Open Systems

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Has Open Access (OA) Week made you excited to learn more about the power of open principles? The Mozilla foundation (the non-profit responsible for the open-source Firefox browser) has launched a news site The Open Standard.

mozilla

The Open Standard provides online news coverage of open, transparent, and collaborative systems at work in technology and our daily lives. Our purpose is to showcase the positive global impact of these systems  and inspire more people to seek out, support and adopt open principles of accessibility, participation and experimentation.

 

The Open Standard is published by Mozilla, a global community of technologists, thinkers and builders working together to promote openness, innovation and opportunity online.  We will disclose and be transparent if we take a position on or promote the products and services of Mozilla or a partner company.

 

 

 

For more information visit the site here.
To learn more about Open Access visit this guide, or this page.




Public Invited to Hear Anthropologist Bill Bass, Oct. 30

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BillBass2Over his fifty-year career as an anthropologist, University of Tennessee Professor Emeritus William M. Bass excavated ancient skeletons and recovered the remains of murder victims. He also headed UT’s anthropology department for more than 20 years and trained many of the nation’s current leading forensic anthropologists.

The University of Tennessee Libraries, which holds the research and teaching materials documenting his illustrious career, will honor Bass and celebrate the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection at an upcoming event. The public is invited to a lecture by Bass and a reception in his honor on Thursday, October 30, at UT’s John C. Hodges Library.

A reception in the Jack E. Reese Galleria begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by the lecture in the Lindsay Young Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Guests also may visit Special Collections to view items from the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.

PrintBass is perhaps best known to the general public as the creator of the “Body Farm” — officially the Anthropology Research Center. The Body Farm was the world’s first laboratory for researching the processes and timetable of decomposition of human remains.

Bass has recounted the story of the Body Farm to many audiences. His talk at the UT library will be something different. He will focus on his more traditional pursuits in the field of anthropology, including excavating human skeletal remains in the Great Plains in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution. His field study notebooks from these excavations are among the materials Bass donated to the UT Libraries to create the Dr. William M. Bass III Collection.





Keith Flynn and Joyce Jenkins at “Writers in the Library,” Oct. 27

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FlynnJenkinsPoets Keith Flynn and Joyce Jenkins will read from their works at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Monday, October 27, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Keith Flynn is the founder and editor of The Asheville Poetry Review, as well as the author of seven books, including five collections of poetry, most recently Colony Collapse Disorder (Wings Press, 2013). His essays on poetry are collected in The Rhythm Method, Razzmatazz and Memory: How To Make Your Poetry Swing (Writer’s Digest Books, 2007). From 1984 to 1999, he was lyricist and lead singer for The Crystal Zoo; currently he tours with a combo, The Holy Men. He has been awarded the Sandburg Prize for poetry, the ASCAP Emerging Songwriter Prize, the Paumanok Poetry Award, and the 2013 NC Literary Fellowship, and was twice named the Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for North Carolina.

Joyce Jenkins is editor and Executive Director of Poetry Flash, California’s iconic online Literary Review and Calendar for the West (poetryflash.org), founded in 1972. Joyce began working with the magazine in 1978. Poetry Flash presents the Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival, Northern California Book Awards, and Poetry Flash Reading Series. She is the author of Portal, a chapbook with an introduction by Carolyn Kizer, and Joy Road, and has read her poetry in the Bay Area and across the country. She received the AAUW Ruth Murray Jones Publishing Award in 1991, American Book Award in 1994, National Poetry Association’s 1995 Award for Distinguished Service, and the 2006 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award for Lifetime Achievement. On behalf of Poetry Flash, she received Litquake’s 2012 Barbary Coast Award. June 6, 2009 was named “Joyce Jenkins Day” by the City of Berkeley in honor of the Berkeley Poetry Festival lifetime achievement award.

At noon, the same day, Katherine Ann Davis, editor of UT’s Grist: The Journal for Writers, will join Flynn and Jenkins for an Editors’ Roundtable at 1210-1211 McClung Tower. They will discuss what editors are looking for when they read submissions — a great networking opportunity for writers who are trying to get published. Refreshments will be served.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a schedule of readings for the 2014-2015 academic year.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters





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