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Workshop: an online tool for data management planning

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Many grant funding agencies require researchers to plan ahead for data preservation and sharing as part of their research projects. To aid with these requirements, the UT Libraries subscribes to an online tool that makes the process a little easier – the DMPTool.

Join Chris Eaker, Data Curation Librarian, for “Getting Started with the DMPTool,” an overview of how to use the tool and its functionality.

When: 2:00-3:00 p.m., Thursday, October 2
Where: Hodges Library, Room 211

Contact Chris Eaker for more information at (865) 974-4404 or ceaker@utk.edu.




Amy Billone at WRITERS IN THE LIBRARY, Sept. 29

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Billone_smallAmy Billone will read from her new poetry collection at UT’s Writers in the Library on Monday, September 29, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Billone’s poetry collection, The Light Changes — named one of Kirkus Review‘s best books of 2013 — invokes the biographical and creative worlds of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Sylvia Plath, and Virginia Woolf. Kirkus has called the book “thrilling in its courageousness, breathtaking in its vividness.” The Light Changes also won the IndieReader Discovery Award in Poetry in 2014.

Amy Billone is currently an associate professor of English at the University of Tennessee, where she teaches courses on 19th century literature, children’s and young adult literature, and world literature. Her areas of expertise include romanticism, children’s and young adult literature, Victorian poetry, gothic studies, creative writing, women writers, and continental poetry. Her scholarly book Little Songs: Women, Silence, and the Nineteenth-Century Sonnet (2007) is informed by her unique perspective as a woman poet. As the only extended study of 19th century female sonneteers, Little Songs sheds light on the overwhelming impact that silence makes, not only on British women’s poetry, but also on the development of modern poetry and thought. Amy Billone also wrote the introduction and notes for the Barnes and Noble Classics edition of Peter Pan (2005).
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Writers in the Library is sponsored by the University of Tennessee Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@utk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@utk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




Banned Books Week, Sept. 21-27

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BBW14_300x250Literature is a powerful force! Every September, libraries and bookstores across the country celebrate Banned Books Week to honor the freedom to read and to draw attention to banned and challenged books.

Join the UT Libraries to celebrate your First Amendment rights during Banned Books Week. We are fortunate to live in a nation that protects the expression of even unpopular or unorthodox points of view. But intellectual freedom is in danger when restraints are imposed on the availability of information in a free society.

Let’s take this opportunity to state our support for ensuring that all viewpoints are available to those who wish to read them.

Read a banned or challenged book. Follow our chalkboard in Hodges Library (next to Starbucks) for a countdown of the Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2013.

You’d be surprised: even classics like To Kill a Mockingbird and The Color Purple have been challenged. See the lists compiled by the American Library Association at ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks.

Follow along on Twitter at #volsread and #readbannedbooks and post a shout-out or a quote from your favorite banned book.






New Streaming Movie Option!

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In addition to our popular Residence Life Cinema, we have added Criterion-On-Demand USA to our suite of streaming services. Criterion-On-Demand USA has a collection of over 600 films Alien Movie Posteravailable at all times.

Films from this service are available off campus, and can even be downloaded to a computer for 48 hours.  Off campus users will be asked for their Net ID and password (just like some of the databases do when accessing off campus). This service requires a download of “Criterion Silverlight Player”, which most of you have already downloaded. Films can be streamed with or without subtitles, and they can be watched individually but cannot be shown at group events.

Criterion-On-Demand USA offers films from 20th Century Fox, Paramount Pictures, Dreamworks SKG, MTV Films, Open Road Films, Fox Searchlight, and some additional smaller studios. New films are added quarterly. Please note that this is not the Criterion Collection of remade classic films and art films. You can begin watching anytime at the following URL:  http://tiny.utk.edu/criterion




Andrew Jackson’s Family Bible: Join us to celebrate

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BibleFrontThe Bible in which President Andrew Jackson’s family recorded household births, marriages, and deaths for more than half a century now belongs to the University of Tennessee Libraries. Jackson’s family Bible was purchased with monies from University Libraries endowments and donations from members of the Library Society of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

We invite all members of the Library Society to join the University Libraries in celebrating this important acquisition. Please join us for a reception and viewing of the Jackson family Bible on Tuesday, September 16, at 5:00 p.m. at UT’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.* Brief remarks will be offered at 5:30. Please RSVP to Megan Venable (mvenable@tennessee.edu or 865-974-6903).

The existence of the Jackson family Bible was known from contemporary newspaper accounts. In the summer of 1833, President Jackson took a formal tour of New England. On June 17, in Hartford, Connecticut, several visitors brought presents to Jackson in his hotel room. Among them were Silas Andrus and James Walker Judd, publishers whose prominent Hartford firm specialized in Bibles and religious books. As reported in the press, they presented Jackson with “an elegant copy of their Stereotype Edition of the quarto Bible, elegantly bound in red morocco, and gilt.” Jackson’s name was embossed on the front cover, and “Righteousness Exalteth a Nation” was emblazoned on the back. This Bible now resides in UT’s Special Collections.

Newspapers also recorded the encomiums exchanged upon presentation of the Bible. Andrus and Judd briefly addressed Jackson, invoking a divine blessing on the country and on him, and Jackson replied in kind, hoping that Americans would become “distinguished for genuine piety among the nations of the earth.” Newspapers throughout the country printed the exchange. But after this moment, the Andrus & Judd Bible vanishes from the public record. For a century and a half, no one outside the Jackson family knew what had happened to it.

“At The Papers of Andrew Jackson project here at UT, we make it our business to track down every surviving Jackson document we can,” said Dan Feller, professor of history and the editor and director of The Papers of Andrew Jackson at UT. “In our files is a thick folder labeled ‘Jackson family Bible.’ The correspondence in that folder chronicles our efforts over a span of decades to locate several Bibles that purportedly belonged to Jackson, but it makes no mention of this one.”

In recent decades, the survival of the Andrus & Judd Bible was rumored. Just a few years ago, the Bible’s owner surfaced briefly. Without ever meeting or knowing the identity of the Bible’s owner, Feller was able to verify from photographs that it was indeed the Bible presented to President Jackson at Hartford. Eventually, Feller’s contacts among antiquarian book lovers turned up the treasure. The Bible was offered for sale earlier this year, and the University Libraries secured a remarkable historical artifact.

Steven Smith, dean of libraries at UT, noted the importance of acquiring the Bible: “More than a cherished family relic…the Jackson family Bible is a treasure of national significance. It is precisely the sort of rare and unique document of our State’s history and politics that Special Collections is meant to preserve. We are thrilled to be able to return President Jackson’s family Bible to Tennessee.”

The Bible will be preserved and housed in Special Collections within the John C. Hodges Library.

Purchase of President Andrew Jackson’s family Bible was made possible by donations from the following:

Endowments:
Angelyn Donaldson and Richard Adolf Koella Historical Documents Endowment
McGregor Smith Library Endowment
Anonymous Library Endowment Fund
United Foods Humanities Library Endowment

Library Society Members:
Samuel Elliott
Jeff Johnson
Charles B. Jones, Jr.
Steven and Natalie Smith
Chuck West

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*Parking is available on Circle Park Drive.

Our thanks to Professor Dan Feller for providing background on the Jackson family Bible.




Library Society Welcomes Graduate Student Members

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Welcome to our twenty-eight new graduate student members of the Library Society of UT Knoxville! These students joined the Library Society at the membership table at the Libraries’ Graduate Student Open House on August 22 in the John C. Hodges Library.

The Libraries sponsor an open house for graduate students each fall. The event is an opportunity for students to learn how the library supports their research and teaching, to meet their department’s subject librarian, and to learn more about resources in their field, learn about citation management tools like Zotero and Endnote, and register for library services such as interlibrary loan and Library Express delivery.

Membership in the Library Society starts at only $5 for current students. Student members enjoy the benefits of membership in the Library Society including receiving a copy of the UT Libraries’ acclaimed Library Development Review and a subscription to the Library Society’s e-newsletter. This year our student members were sponsored by Library Society board members Jeff Johnson, Charles Jones and Pat Jobe.




Library Hires Student Success Librarians

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Ingrid Ruffin and Anna Sandelli are pictured in the Hodges Library's new research assistance area.

Ingrid Ruffin and Anna Sandelli are pictured in the Hodges Library’s new research assistance area.

The University of Tennessee Libraries is pleased to announce the appointment of two new faculty members. Ingrid Ruffin (pictured, left) is Student Success Librarian for First-Year Programs. Anna Sandelli (right) is Student Success Librarian for Undergraduate User Experience.

What do Student Success Librarians do? Basically, they help students learn the tools of scholarship while adjusting to college life. Two keys to undergraduate success are finding a sense of place at the university and gaining the information literacy skills students will need in every class they take. Success at those vital steps boosts first-to-second-year retention rates and six-year graduation rates—both top priorities for the university. Our Student Success Librarians will implement and expand instruction and academic engagement programs to improve the user experience for undergraduates at UT.

Ingrid Ruffin has experience developing pre-college and first-year programs at UT; for the past two years she served as a diversity librarian resident in the UT Libraries. She is an Air Force veteran and currently serves on the Department of Veterans Affairs Advisory Committee on the Readjustment of Veterans.

Anna Sandelli comes to UT from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she worked with the User Experience team to deliver information literacy and technology instruction to undergraduates. She has a background in corporate communications with an international company for which she provided outreach and marketing services.




“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms” Natural History Illustration Exhibit at McClung Museum

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BBB_Banner_p815A new exhibit exploring natural history illustration from the 1500s to the 1800s opens Friday, September 12, at UT’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture. Some of the rare books on display are on loan from the University Libraries’ Special Collections. Special Collections items include works of zoological and botanical illustration, notably a 1665 imprint of the historic Micrographia, by Robert Hooke.

“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms: Natural History Illustration from the 1500s–1800s” will run through January 4, 2015, and explores over 300 years of the intersection of science and art in natural history illustration.

More than fifty rare books, prints, and objects are on view, highlighting how increasing access to books, travel, and technology, as well as the evolution of knowledge, changed the way in which illustrations were created and interpreted. From fantastical images of beasts in the 1500s, to extremely accurate depictions of plants and animals in the 1800s, the illustrations in the exhibit demonstrate the rapid advances of natural history during the print age.

Several exhibit-related programs are planned. Free family programming includes exhibit-related Family Fun Days on September 27 and November 1, and a Stroller Tour for parents, caregivers and young children on October 6.

Other programming includes a natural history illustration workshop, “Using Scratchboard to Create Lifelike Illustrations” on October 5, and lectures on natural history and illustration by Barney Lipscomb, Leonhardt Chair of Botany at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas, on October 22, and UT Professor of History Denise Phillips on November 6.

See the exhibit page for more programming details: http://tiny.utk.edu/birdsbugsblooms.

“Birds, Bugs, & Blooms” is curated by Catherine Shteynberg and Christine Dano Johnson. Lenders include Arader Galleries, Dr. Gordon Burghardt, the National Museum of Health and Medicine, and UT Special Collections. The exhibit is presented by Arader Galleries, W. Graham Arader III, UT Federal Credit Union, the Ready for the World Initiative, ARAMARK, Bennett Galleries, and the Ardath & Joel E. Rynning Museum Fund. Additional support is provided by Knox County, the City of Knoxville, and the Arts & Heritage Fund.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on the weekdays. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.

Additional parking information is available at http://mcclungmuseum.utk.edu/visit/parking.

For more information about the McClung Museum and its collections and exhibits, visit http://mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.




B.J. (Bob) Leggett leads off “Writers in the Library”

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BJLeggett_smallAuthor B.J. Leggett will give the first “Writers in the Library” reading of the 2014-15 academic year. Leggett will read from his latest novel, Prosperity, on Monday, September 15, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Prosperity tells the story of police lieutenant Robert O’Brian, who takes early retirement after being shot in a drug raid and returns to his hometown of Prosperity in the mountains of Eastern Tennessee to work on a second novel. But O’Brian’s plans are unexpectedly disrupted when he becomes involved in the investigation of the death of a high school friend.

B.J. (Bob) Leggett is professor emeritus at UT Knoxville, where he held the title of Distinguished Professor of Humanities. He is the author of numerous studies of modern poetry and criticism, including books on A. E. Housman, Philip Larkin, and Wallace Stevens. Prosperity is his second novel. The first, Playing Out the String, was published by Livingston Press in 2004.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Other authors scheduled to read this semester are, in order of appearance, Amy Billone, Elizabeth McCracken, Keith Flynn, Joyce Jenkins, and David James Poissant. For a schedule of upcoming readings and videos of past events, visit lib.utk.edu/writers.

The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. Writers in the Library events are emceed by the Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, Christopher Hebert.





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