The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

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Vol Walk of Life: engage, explore, pick a major

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Get on the path to success. Explore the Vol Walk of Life on Wednesday, March 4, 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Hodges Library, 2nd floor. The Student Government Association has convened representatives from Advising, Career Services, the Student Success Center, the Multicultural Mentoring Program, the Libraries, academic departments, and others. Discuss your career path. Pick a major. (Did you know that UT offers more than 170 undergraduate majors, concentrations, and specializations?)

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Pendergrass Library Open Today, Feb. 26

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Pendergrass Library is open today, Thursday, February 26th.   We intend to be open normal hours (until midnight), but should we close early due to inclement weather, visit the Pendergrass website to see updates to our hours: www.lib.utk.edu/agvet/

Use caution when driving in inclement weather, and check the campus status for any future University closings: http://www.utk.edu/status/  If the University is open, Pendergrass will make every attempt to be open.




Upcoming Events: Old-Time Musician Dom Flemons, Author David Madden

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FlemonsYou’re invited to join the Library Society of the University of Tennessee and the Friends of the Knox County Public Library for an evening with Dom Flemons, the American Songster, on Thursday, March 12, at 7:00 p.m. at the Bijou Theatre. The event is free and open to the public. But, due to high demand, registration is required — at http://www.knoxfriends.org.

Flemons will present this year’s Wilma Dykeman Stokely Memorial Lecture. His performance will be a lecture/demonstration of the history of old-time folk music and its relevance in today’s diverse musical world, with commentary and musical examples as appropriate.

Flemons is widely known for his role in reintroducing the old-time African-American string band music, made famous by groups such as the Tennessee Chocolate Drops, to a new generation. Flemons left the Carolina Chocolate Drops in July 2013 to pursue a solo career. His solo album Prospect Hill was released in July 2014. He was featured on Fresh Air with Terry Gross in July and on Folk Alley Presents in September. His album was one of Folk Alley’s Top 10 Folk and Americana Albums of 2014.

Flemons also will be the featured performer at the Annual Conference of the Society for Ethnomusicology hosted by the UT School of Music. His performance at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, March 13, at the Natalie L. Haslam Music Center will be free and open to the public, although seating is limited.

MaddenNovelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and critic, David Madden will be honored at a reception and lecture hosted by Libraries on Tuesday, April 7, at 5:30 p.m. at UT’s McClung Museum.

Madden’s novels include Cassandra Singing, Bijou, The Suicide’s Wife, Abducted by Circumstance, and London Bridge in Plague and Fire. His most recent work, The Last Bizarre Tale, consists of stories that have appeared in journals but have not appeared together as a collection. The title story, “The Last Bizarre Tale,” involving a corpse that has hung on a hook in a funeral home garage for decades, is evocative of Poe and, in its dark, grotesque humor, Flannery O’Connor and Carson McCullers. “Process is as important as product to David Madden,” writes editor James Perkins, “and one can learn as much about the process of writing as about the human condition by a careful reading of these stories.”

David Madden is a Knoxville native and a graduate of the University of Tennessee. He earned an M.A. at San Francisco State and attended Yale Drama School on a John Golden Fellowship. Writer-in-residence at Louisiana State University from 1968 to 1992, Director of the Creative Writing Program 1992-1994, and Founding Director of the United States Civil War Center 1992-1999, he is now LSU Robert Penn Warren Professor of Creative Writing, Emeritus.




The latest from the Smokies Project: The Photographs and Films of William Derris

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WalkerSisters2From the 1940s through the 1960s, William Derris, owner of the Derris Motel in Townsend, traveled by automobile around the accessible parts of the Smokies recording the people and scenery in both slides and silent film. He used the images and films to entertain and inform the guests at his hotel. His collection was donated to the UT Special Collections and is now the newest digital project from the Great Smoky Mountains Regional Project and the UT Digital Library: digital.lib.utk.edu/derris.

As part of a student practicum project, approximately 340 of the 4400 slides were digitized to create the online presentation. These images document seasonal landscapes in Townsend, Tuckaleechee, Cades Cove, Newfound Gap and Fontana. Derris photographed the Walker Sisters, the most famous residents of Little Greenbrier, and many of the wildflowers he encountered on his travels.

CadesCoveThe films presented a unique opportunity for the team who worked on the collection. The original footage is on 8mm film spools. It includes not only films of the Smokies but many other locales as well. To create the digital collection, the films were first digitized and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips. Since the films were silent, the team decided to add folk music. Local musicians Chris Durman (also our Music Librarian), Steve White, and Leslie Gengozian recorded live music to accompany the films. The musical tunes were selected because there is evidence from folksong collectors that they were played in the Smokies. The result is a wonderful hybrid of new and old technology.




Letters from a Founding Father

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WashingtonLetterWilliam Blount and John Sevier are early American politicians that you would expect to be represented in the University of Tennessee Special Collections manuscript collection. But other members of our founding generation represented in UT’s Special Collections might surprise you. For example we have three items from George Washington, the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army and the new nation’s first President.

The first Washington letter that the library received was donated in 1945 by an alumnus, W. C. Taylor, who had bought the letter from the family of Major James Grant. Grant was an early Tennessee figure, who was involved in his friend William Blount’s conspiracy to seize Louisiana for Britain, and Florida for the United States. The letter was an introductory fragment of a message to William Blount from Washington; it expressed regret that the press of business at the end of the recent congressional session caused him to fall behind in his correspondence. Also part of the donation was a masonic medal, possibly of the Order of Cincinnatus, which Washington and Hamilton had established for former officers of the Continental Army. Grant family tradition held that the medal had been sent to Grant by Washington himself.

The second Washington letter came through another donation, the “Greer and Vinsinger Family Collection,” which consists mostly of material from their ancestor Col. Anthony Walton White. During the American Revolution, White fielded two cavalry regiments at his own expense. Also within this collection are letters from the Marquis de Lafayette, Alexander Hamilton, Horatio Gates, Henry Knox, Banastre Tarleton of the British army, and “Mad” Anthony Wayne. Washington’s letter orders White to send twelve horses to be used by Washington’s staff until their own horses can arrive, and to send an officer to convey instructions to Lafayette.

The third Washington item is contained in an autograph collection assembled by the university’s McClung Museum. Some of the material was donated by Judge and Mrs. John W. Greene when they donated their collection of McClung family papers. Other items came to the museum from various donors. Within the collection are not only letters from George Patton and Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Lee McClung’s correspondence with the actor William Gillette and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, but also letters from the founding generation such as John Marshall, Thomas Jefferson, the Marquis de Lafayette, “Light-Horse Harry” Lee, James Madison, as well as George Washington. The Washington item in the collection is his note written on a letter that had been sent his brother John Augustine Washington. The letter deals with the administration of justice in Pennsylvania over a land dispute. Washington’s note urges mediation as the best solution to the problem.

Thanks to the generosity of donors, students of the University of Tennessee can have the rare privilege of seeing and using letters of the “Father of our Country” George Washington and others of that great generation.




It’s all about student success.

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Four-Hour Film Festival

For the past two years, Media Literacy Librarian Michelle Brannen and Student Success Librarian Ingrid Ruffin have teamed up with UT’s Division of Student Life and resident assistants in the dorms to host a four-hour video contest. The most recent Four-Hour Film Festival took place on February 21. Students were given the necessary equipment, a short instruction session, and space to edit a brief film. In the span of a mere four hours, teams of students created and screened films. Prizes went to the best entries. James Agan, resident assistant in Hess Hall, said, “My residents had the most fun that they have had all year participating in a program.” The program garners support from the Libraries, Residence Halls, UT’s Cinema Studies Department, and the Knoxville Film Festival. Participants learn about valuable resources in the libraries, how to shoot and edit film, and, most importantly, that the Libraries, University, and community care about students and their success.

De-Stress for Success

“De-Stress for Success” highlights the libraries as a place to support the whole student. Each year as final exams loom over anxious students, the UT Libraries and its partners provide de-stressing activities to support relaxation and wellness. Activities such as 15-minute massages, play time with H.A.B.I.T. therapy dogs, and playing games in the living room (Mary E. Greer Room) give students a healthy diversion during a very stressful time. The events change from year to year, but the goal remains the same — to support students and to provide a little stress relief during some of the more intense times of the semester. Even as we strive to provide access to the best resources possible to encourage the creation of big ideas, we work diligently to ensure that students feel that they are part of the larger campus community.

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Digital Humanities Talk, March 9

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The campus is invited to a presentation on “The Out-of-Control Zone: Digital Humanities, Data Curation and Other New Endeavors in Librarianship” on Monday, March 9, at 7:00 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library.

What do digital humanists need from libraries? Join visionary Trevor Muñoz in re-imagining how libraries can become more actively engaged in supporting data-intensive research in the humanities.

Trevor Muñoz is Assistant Dean for Digital Humanities Research at the University of Maryland Libraries and an Associate Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH). He works on developing digital research projects and services at the intersection of digital humanities centers and libraries. He is also responsible for curating the active research data of MITH and for helping the University of Maryland Libraries plan and create a broad complement of data curation and e-research services.

Faculty also are invited to a coffee hour with Muñoz from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m., March 9, in the Mary Greer Room, 258 Hodges Library.




Poet and Activist Cameron Conaway at “Writers in the Library” March 2

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ConawayDillonCameron Conaway, whose activism is as well known as his writing, will read at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Monday, March 2, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

Conaway is the author of five books, including Malaria Poems (Michigan State University Press) and Chittagong: Poems & Essays (Iris Press). He recently received a grant from the Pulitzer Center for Conflict Reporting to do more malaria research in India. His international investigations into the horrors of child slavery have shaped current language on the issue.

In addition to poetry and activism, Conaway has also had a career in MMA cage-fighting, and he also teaches creative writing at Penn State Brandywine. He currently serves on the editorial board at Slavery Today: A Multidisciplinary Journal of Human Trafficking Solutions.

Conaway will also co-host a Nosh ‘n Chat titled Poetry & Modern Masculinity: Collisions with UT alum Andrew P. Dillon at 2 p.m. in 1210-1211 McClung Tower. Dillon is a graduate of the University of Tennessee’s MFA class. His poetry has appeared recently in One Trick Pony Review, The Burlesque Press Variety Show and Connotation Press.

Writers in the Library hosts readings by noted authors of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the UT Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

Christopher Hebert, the UT Libraries’ Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence, emcees Writers in the Library events. Hebert and Marilyn Kallet, director of the UT Creative Writing Program, have lined up an exceptional group of authors to read in the 2014–2015 academic year. Visit lib.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters




African-American Read-In Feb. 27

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Join the African-American Read-In on Friday, February 27, 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. in the Hodges Library auditorium. Students, faculty, staff, administrators . . . all are invited to read an excerpt from a favorite book by an African-American author.

Readers can bring a book to the reading or select a text from African-American authored books that will be on display outside the auditorium. Contemporary, award-winning children’s books by African-American authors are already on display for browsing in the Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature (3rd floor, Hodges Library).

Readers are encouraged to find texts to read prior to the event. Search the Libraries’ catalog (e.g., American literature – African American authors), browse the display in the Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature, or examine the bibliography of recommended books at the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) website: www.ncte.org/aari.

If you want to participate as a reader, email Dr. Susan Groenke, director of the Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature, at sgroenke@nullutk.edu) to reserve a 10-minute time slot between 1:00 and 5:00 p.m.

Sponsored nationally by the Black Caucus of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the Read-In makes literacy and the literary works of African-American authors a central part of Black History Month. UT’s Read-In is sponsored by the Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature, in conjunction with the Commission for Blacks; Black Educators of Tomorrow; the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences; the College of Communications and Information Sciences; the Department of English; and the Office of Multicultural Student Life.




Adam Ross reading rescheduled for Mon., Feb. 23

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AdamRossAdam Ross, celebrated novelist and short story writer, will read from his work on February 23 at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, as part of the Writers in the Library series.

The reading will be in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library at 7 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

Adam Ross’s debut novel, Mr. Peanut, a 2010 New York Times Notable Book, was also named one of the best books of the year by The New Yorker, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New Republic, and The Economist. It has been published in sixteen countries. Ladies and Gentlemen, his short story collection, was included in Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2011 and included “In the Basement,” a finalist for the 2012 BBC International Story Award.

Ross was a 2013–2014 Hodder Fellow at Princeton University and the Mary Ellen von der Heyden Fellow in Fiction at The American Academy in Berlin for the fall of 2014. He is currently serving as the English Department’s Visiting Writer at the University of Tennessee.

Read about Adam Ross’s forthcoming novel at Chapter 16: a community of Tennessee writers, readers and passersby (brought to you by Humanities Tennessee).

For more information about Adam Ross, visit adam-ross.com.
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For further information contact Marilyn Kallet, Director, UT Creative Writing Program (mkallet@nullutk.edu), or Christopher Hebert, Writer-in-Residence, UT Libraries (chebert3@nullutk.edu).

Follow us at:
www.facebook.com/Writers.in.the.Library
twitter.com/utklibwriters





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The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System